Video Transcript

(theme music plays)
A lushly vegetated valley is shrouded in mist, with a volcanic hill
in the background. The view swings aroound to show red sandstone outcrops
and gray cliffs, a waterfall seen from above and a forest fire. A monkey
on a clifftop cracks a nut using a stone. A jaguar turns its head toward
the camera. A hummingbird sips nectar from a red and yellow flower. Alligators
and otters sport in the water. The B.B.C. Earth logo briefly appears. A
coati scrambles up a tree and another calls from the ground. Other animals
appear. A lightning bolt flashes from a gray thundercloud.

The Narrator says BRAZIL... THE
BEATING HEART OF SOUTH AMERICA.
VAST LANDSCAPES CARVED BY THE
IRRESISTIBLE FORCES OF NATURE.
(dramatic music plays)
MORE ANIMALS LIVE HERE THAN IN
ANY OTHER NATION ON EARTH.
(squeaking animal call)
THIS IS THEIR STORY.
AS THE SEASONS CHANGE, ANIMAL
FAMILIES FACE EXTREME CHALLENGES...
[thunderclap]
(epic music plays)

The Narrator continues IMMENSE FLOODS...
(water splashing as animal dives in)
BRUTAL DROUGHT.

A red sun shines through heat haze.

The Narrator continues SURVIVING AND RAISING YOUNG.

An anteater forages. Baby otters play and squeal beside their mother.
[squeaking]

The Narrator continues THROUGH THE GOOD TIMES AND THE BAD.

Two animals face off. A monkey shrieks. An alligator blinks.
[menacing yips, shrieking]

The Narrator continues THIS IS AN INTIMATE JOURNEY TO
THE HEART OF A SPECTACULAR COUNTRY.
(music climaxes)

Over a view of coatis foraging in tall grass with their tails up, a full-screen
title reads "Wild Brazil."
(gentle music plays)

A green floodplain dotted with lakes and rivers appears. A baby capuchin
monkey scrambles along a branch.

The Narrator continues THE MONSOON FLOODS ARE OVER AND
THE LAND IS DRYING OUT FAST.
THE BABY TUFTED CAPUCHIN HAS
FOUND HIS PLACE IN HIS GROUP'S
COMPLEX SOCIETY.

coati pups play together and attack a marauding bird.

The Narrator continues THE YOUNG COATIS HAVE WORKED
OUT WHO'S FRIEND AND WHO'S FOE.

Baby otters swim near their parents by a river bank.

The Narrator continues AND THE OTTER KITS HAVE LEARNED
TO SWIM IN BRAZIL'S MOST
DANGEROUS WATERS.
WITH THE YOUNGSTERS BECOMING
INDEPENDENT, THEIR PARENTS ARE
THINKING ABOUT THE NEXT GENERATION.
BUT FINDING A MATE WON'T BE EASY.
THEY'RE ABOUT TO BE FACED WITH
BRAZIL'S HARSHEST SEASON...
DROUGHT AND FIRE.

A forest fire rages in a red haze of smoke. An episode title reads "Enduring
the Drought."
[roaring, crackling flames]
(dramatic music plays)

Over a parched canyon wall, an opening credit reads "Narrated by Stephen
Mangan."

The Narrator continues THIS IS THE HOTTEST, DRIEST
PART OF BRAZIL, NORTHEAST PIAUI.
THE TEMPERATURE HERE EXCEEDS 40
DEGREES CENTIGRADE.
IT HASN'T RAINED FOR MONTHS.
[banging echoes]

A pair of monkey hands slams a giant seed pod on a rock. Another monkey
digs a hole with a stick.

The Narrator continues THESE CANYONS ARE HOME TO A
GROUP OF TUFTED CAPUCHIN MONKEYS.
THE YOUNG ONES ARE GROWING UP FAST.
THIS FEMALE NO LONGER HAS A
BABY TO LOOK AFTER, AND HER
BIOLOGICAL CLOCK HAS STARTED TICKING AGAIN.
IN HER EYES, HER PERFECT
PARTNER IS THE DOMINANT MALE.
HE'S STRONG AND HEALTHY, AND
HE'S BEEN HEAD OF THIS TROOP
FOR FIVE YEARS.

The female monkey approaches the male, who shows little interest.

The Narrator continues SOON SHE'LL BE READY TO MATE,
BUT SHE'S CHOSEN JUST ABOUT THE
TOUGHEST TIME OF YEAR TO START
COURTING HIM.
IT'S NOT EASY LIVING HERE AT
ANY TIME OF YEAR, BUT IN THE
DRY SEASON, FINDING FOOD IS
INCREDIBLY HARD.
THE ONLY REASON THESE MONKEYS
CAN SURVIVE HERE AT ALL IS
BECAUSE THEY'VE WORKED OUT HOW
TO USE TOOLS.
EVEN SO, THEY MUST SPEND MUCH
OF THEIR TIME FORAGING.
IT TAKES A LOT OF PRACTICE!
CAPUCHIN FEMALES NEED TO GIVE
BIRTH WHEN THERE'S MORE FOOD
AROUND... IN THE WET SEASON.
TO DO THAT, SHE NEEDS TO MATE NOW.
TIMING IS EVERYTHING.
UNFORTUNATELY, HE DOESN'T SHARE
HER ENTHUSIASM.
FEMALE CAPUCHINS HAVE TO BE PERSISTENT.
SHE TRIES TO SEDUCE HIM.
[soft chirping sounds]
BUT HE'S PLAYING HARD-TO-GET.

She sits below the male, looking up at him and cooing.
[soft chirping sounds]

The Narrator continues HE'S GOT ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD...
SHE DOESN'T.
SHE'LL HAVE TO DO MORE TO
IMPRESS HIM, AND SOON.
(dramatic music plays)
MEANWHILE, HER WORLD GROWS
HOTTER AND DRIER.

A satellite clip homes in on Brazil. An aerial clip shows kidney-shape
lakes on a floodplain. Another clip shows the same area, now dried up.

The Narrator continues HUNDREDS OF MILES TO THE
SOUTHWEST, WHOLE LANDSCAPES ARE
CHANGING DRAMATICALLY.
A FEW MONTHS AGO, VAST FLOODS
COVERED BRAZIL'S VAZANTES.
NOW, THE LAND IS TURNING TO DUST.

(dramatic music plays)
[loud squawking]
A pair of large, black-headed storks lands on a grassy field. Curly-tailed
coatis surround a waterhole.

The Narrator continues POOLS ARE BECOMING DESPERATELY SCARCE.
THIS TINY WATERHOLE IS NOW THE
ONLY ONE FOR MILES AROUND.
IT'S A LIFELINE FOR MANY
CREATURES, INCLUDING THIS
FAMILY OF COATIS.
THEY SURVIVED THE FLOOD BY
TAKING REFUGE IN THE TREES.
NOW, THEY FACE A LONG TREK
EVERY DAY JUST TO GET A DRINK.
THIS GROUP'S LARGEST COATI IS
A DARK MALE.
BUT HE'S JUST A GUEST IN THIS
ALL-FEMALE GROUP.
HE'S COME HERE TO FIND A MATE.
THEIR YOUNGSTERS ARE ALMOST
FULLY-GROWN, SO THIS MALE KNOWS
THAT THE FEMALES WILL SOON BE
READY TO BREED.
JUST LIKE THE CAPUCHINS, FOR
THE COATIS, THE DRY SEASON IS
ALL ABOUT COURTSHIP.
THE FEMALES MUST CONCEIVE NOW
SO THEIR BABIES ARE BORN WITH
THE RAINS.
BUT RIGHT NOW, THEY DON'T SEEM
TO BE IN ANY HURRY.
AND EVEN THE MALE SEEMS HAPPY
ENOUGH TO WAIT.
BUT THERE'S TROUBLE AHEAD... A RIVAL MALE.

Another large coati approaches through the grass.

The Narrator continues HE'S NOT ATTACHED TO ANY GROUP
AT THE MOMENT, BUT HE'D LIKE TO BE.
IF THE DARK MALE WANTS TO STAY
HERE, HE MAY HAVE TO FIGHT FOR IT.

The darker and lighter males face off. The lighter one advances, showing
his teeth and raising hackles. He charges, and scares off the dark one.
[males grunting]

The Narrator continues HE SIZES UP HIS RIVAL.
[males grunting]
MALE COATIS PACK A SERIOUS SET OF TEETH.
AND THE INTRUDER MAKES HIMSELF
BIGGER BY BRISTLING UP HIS FUR.
[males grunting]
HE MEANS BUSINESS.
[raspy grunts]
HE HAS NOTHING TO LOSE.
THE DARK MALE HAS A SIMPLE
CHOICE... STAY AND FIGHT OR WALK AWAY.
[raspy grunts]
-- HE'S LOST HIS FEMALES.
IF HE WANTS TO BE A FATHER THIS
YEAR, HE'LL HAVE TO WIN THEM BACK.
AND SOON, HE'LL BE OUT OF TIME.
THE DRY SEASON IS ALMOST AT ITS PEAK.
THE TROPICAL SUN BAKES THE LAND.
WHAT FEW CLOUDS REMAIN OFFER NO
CHANCE OF RAIN.
AND WITH NO RAIN TO FEED THE
RIVERS, THE PANTANAL, THE
LARGEST FRESHWATER WETLAND ON
THE PLANET, IS STARTING TO DRY OUT.

An aerial view shows dry river beds. Clips show the rivers swollen at the
height of the flood season. A jaguar lies in the shade of a tree, breathing
heavily.

The Narrator continues THE FLOOD SEASON SEEMS LIKE A
DISTANT MEMORY.
[insects chirping]
AT THIS TIME OF YEAR, KEEPING
COOL IS A REAL PROBLEM.
AT OVER 100 KILOS - ALMOST AS
BIG AS A LION - THIS MALE
JAGUAR FEELS THE HEAT MORE THAN MOST.
[heavy panting]
IN THE COMING WEEKS, HE, TOO,
MUST FIND A MATE.
BUT FOR NOW, HE CAN'T EVEN FIND
A BIT OF PEACE IN THE SHADE.

Giant otters swim by making noises. They gather, facing the jaguar and leap
in the water to scare him off.
[squealing and growling]

The Narrator continues THIS GIANT OTTER FAMILY ARE
NOISY NEIGHBOURS AND FIERCELY
PROTECTIVE OF THEIR FAVOURITE SANDBANKS.
[squealing]
UNLIKE JAGUARS, THE PARENTS OF
THIS YOUNG OTTER AREN'T
THINKING ABOUT MATING... THEY'VE
STILL GOT SOME MORE PARENTING TO DO.
SOON, IT'LL BE TIME FOR THIS
ONE TO LEARN HOW TO CATCH HER OWN FISH.
[loud squeaking]
HER MOTHER'S MILK IS RUNNING DRY.
SO NOW, WHEN THE REST OF THE
FAMILY BRING FISH BACK TO THE
HOLT, SHE'S DETERMINED TO GRAB
A PIECE FOR HERSELF.
GETTING FISH FROM THE ADULTS IS EASY.
KEEPING IT FROM HER SIBLINGS IS
MUCH TRICKIER.

The young otters squabble over a piece of fish.
[menacing squeals]
[growling]

The Narrator continues
FIGHTS LIKE THIS AREN'T JUST ABOUT FOOD.
[growling]
GIANT OTTERS LIVE IN LARGE FAMILIES.
THIS WILL HELP ESTABLISH THEIR
POSITION IN THE GROUP'S PECKING ORDER.
[growling]
OH, DEAR.

The larger kit finally snatches the piece of fish from the smaller one.
[high-pitched squeals]

The Narrator continues MOTHER'S MILK WON'T BE ENOUGH
FOR MUCH LONGER.
THE SOONER SHE CAN CATCH HER
OWN FISH, THE BETTER.
THE DROPPING WATER LEVELS MEAN
FISHING SHOULD BECOME EASIER
FOR THE OTTERS.

A male jaguar plods forward, grunting. He sniffs at the base of a tree.
[loud snorting]
The Narrator continues BUT FOR THE JAGUARS, IT MAKES LIFE HARDER.
THIS MALE IS NOW SEARCHING FOR A MATE.
SCENT MARKS TELL HIM IF ANY
RECEPTIVE FEMALES HAVE BEEN HERE.
WHAT HE CAN'T TELL IS WHERE TO FIND THEM.
A FEMALE'S TERRITORY CAN
STRETCH FOR 50 SQUARE KILOMETRES.
AND THE FALLING WATER LEVELS
MEAN THAT WITH EVERY PASSING
DAY, HE HAS TO COVER MORE AND
MORE GROUND TO TRY AND FIND HER.

A dry pool appears.

The Narrator continues AS THE DRY SEASON WEARS ON,
SOME OF THE RIVERS STOP FLOWING ALTOGETHER.
MOST OF THE FISH TRAPPED IN
THIS POOL WERE SNAPPED UP LONG AGO.
IT'S A CHALLENGING TIME FOR CAIMAN.

Two cayman lie beside the trickle of water remaining in the pool, with
jaws open. The face and mouth of one are covered with porcupine quills.

The Narrator continues THIS ONE MUST HAVE BEEN
DESPERATE TO TACKLE A PORCUPINE.
FOR THE ANIMALS THAT LIVE HERE,
THE PRESSURE IS INTENSE...
BUT FOR ONE CREATURE, THIS IS
THEIR MOMENT.

A bird swoops to the water's surface and scoops something up in its beak.

The Narrator continues DURING THE WET SEASON, MILLIONS
OF CATERPILLARS GREW FAT ON AN
ABUNDANCE OF LEAVES.
NOW, THEY'VE EMERGED AS HAWK MOTHS.
THEY'LL MATE AND LAY EGGS IN
JUST A FEW DAYS.
BUT FIRST THEY MUST DRINK, AND
THERE ARE VERY FEW PLACES LEFT
TO DO THAT SAFELY.
(dramatic music plays)

Fluttering moths concentrate on the remaining pools. Caiman and birds snap
them up.
(splashing)

The Narrator continues MORE AND MORE MOTHS EMERGE FROM
THE SURROUNDING TREES.
HATCHING ALL TOGETHER MEANS
THAT ENOUGH OF THEM WILL
SURVIVE TO FIND A MATE.
THE FEMALES WILL LAY EGGS READY
TO HATCH WHEN THERE'S PLENTY OF
GREENERY FOR A NEW GENERATION
OF CATERPILLARS.

The sun slowly sets over a scene of fluttering moths and lunging caiman.
The screen fades to black and then dawn breaks behind the rugged walls
of a canyon. As the sun rises, the canyon comes to life. The female monkey
keeps company with the dominant male. The young monkey smashes a nut.
(bird calls)

The Narrator continues IN THE DRY CANYONS OF SERRA DA
CAPIVARA, ALL THE CAPUCHINS ARE
FEELING THE HEAT.
FOR THIS FEMALE CAPUCHIN,
THINGS HAVE BECOME EVEN MORE URGENT.
SHE HAS COME INTO OESTRUS...
SHE MUST MATE IN THE NEXT
FOUR DAYS IF SHE WANTS TO HAVE A BABY.
(monkey twittering)
SHE'S NOW SO OBSESSED THAT
SHE'S BARELY EATING, OR EVEN DRINKING.
THAT'S GOT TO BE TOUGH IN THIS HEAT.
[soft chirping]
FOR THE TROOP'S YOUNGEST
MEMBER, JUST FINDING FOOD IS A STRUGGLE.
[banging]
EVEN THE ADULTS FIND IT HARD.
[banging]
BUT THESE MONKEYS AREN'T AFTER
FOOD... THEY'RE AFTER MINERALS.
[banging]
AND THEY GET THOSE BY LICKING
OR EVEN INHALING THIS DUST.
NO ONE KNOWS WHY THEY DO IT.
BUT THIS GROUP ARE PROBABLY THE
SMARTEST MONKEYS IN THE WORLD,
AND THEY MAY BE USING THIS FOR
MEDICINAL PURPOSES.
[banging]
QUITE HOW THEY LEARNED TO DO
THIS IS A MYSTERY, BUT
CAPUCHINS LEARN BY EXAMPLE.
ONE MONKEY STARTS, AND SOON
THEY'RE ALL DOING IT.
BUT DESPITE THEIR OBVIOUS
INTELLIGENCE, THIS MALE SEEMS
INCAPABLE OF TAKING A HINT.
MALES OF MOST SPECIES RARELY
NEED TO BE ASKED MORE THAN ONCE.
BUT NO MATTER WHAT SHE TRIES,
SHE JUST CAN'T GET HIS ATTENTION.

The female monkey desperately cavorts around the male.
[screeching]
The Narrator continues SHE HAS JUST DAYS TO CHANGE HIS MIND.
[squealing]

The scene changes to the Pantanal.

The Narrator continues DROUGHT TIGHTENS ITS GRIP
ACROSS THE COUNTRY.
THE PANTANAL'S RIVERS SHRINK
FURTHER IN THE BAKING SUN.
SILT FROM THE LAST FLOODS DRIES INTO DUST.
THE SAND IS ALMOST TOO HOT TO WALK ON.

Dust blows on the clifftops. A jaguar walks gingerly in the hot sand at
the edge of a pool. A caiman sits in the shade of a tree.

The Narrator continues
EVEN THE CAIMAN TAKE COVER IN THE SHADE.
THIS MALE JAGUAR CAN'T REST... HE
HAS TOO MUCH GROUND TO COVER IN
HIS SEARCH FOR A MATE.
WITH SO LITTLE WATER LEFT, THE
CHANCES ARE THAT ANY FEMALES
WILL BE SOMEWHERE ALONG THIS RIVER.
AND ALTHOUGH HE DOESN'T REALIZE
IT, THERE IS A FEMALE JUST A
FEW MILES AWAY.

The female jaguar walks along, head to the ground, looking for something
to eat.

The Narrator continues SHE, TOO, HAS A ONE-TRACK MIND,
BUT FOOD IS WHAT SHE'S AFTER.
LIKE MANY OF THE PANTANAL'S
JAGUARS, SHE SPECIALIZES IN
HUNTING CAIMAN, WHICH IS WHY
ADULTS WILL FLEE AT THE FIRST
SIGHT OF A JAGUAR.
[soft grunts]
BUT BABY CAIMAN HAVE YET TO LEARN THIS.
[soft grunts]
AT THIS TIME OF YEAR, THEY'RE
HIDING IN THE NOOKS AND
CRANNIES OF THE EXPOSED BANKS.
EASY PICKINGS IF SHE CAN DIG ONE OUT.
THEY MAY NOT BE MUCH OF A MEAL,
BUT THEY'RE EASIER TO CATCH,
AND SHE NEEDS ALL THE FOOD SHE CAN GET.

She digs busily in the river bank. She scoops the baby up in her jaws.

The Narrator continues THAT'S A LOT OF WORK FOR A
LITTLE CAIMAN.
SHE'LL NEED PLENTY MORE IF
SHE'S TO BREED SUCCESSFULLY.
THE LOWER WATER LEVEL SHOULD
MAKE OUR BABY OTTERS' LIVES EASIER.
AFTER ALL, LESS WATER SHOULD
MAKE FISH EASIER TO CATCH.
BUT LESS WATER MEANS MORE MUD.
AND THAT MAKES FISH HARD TO SEE.

A female otter waves her head in the water, feeling for fish with her
whiskers. A male pulls out a huge fish. the young otters fight over morsels.

The Narrator continues SHE MUST LEARN TO USE HER
WHISKERS INSTEAD.
[squealing and growling]
IT COULD TAKE A WHILE TO GET
THE HANG OF IT.
THE ADULTS MAKE IT LOOK EASY.
[loud squealing]
BUT THE DAYS OF FREE HANDOUTS
ARE OVER.
[loud squealing]
PERHAPS TEMPTATION WILL
ENCOURAGE HER TO HUNT.
[loud squealing]
THERE ARE OVER 200 SPECIES OF
FISH IN THESE RIVERS... SHE JUST
NEEDS TO CATCH ONE OF THEM.
[squealing]
HER MOTHER KEEPS A CLOSE EYE.
[grunts and yips]
SUCCESS! IT'S AN IMPORTANT MOMENT, ONE
OF HER FINAL STEPS TOWARDS ADULTHOOD.
HER PARENTS' DUTIES ARE ALMOST DONE.
SOON, HER MOTHER WILL TURN HER
ATTENTIONS BACK TO HER PARTNER
AND WILL LOOK TO EXPAND THE
FAMILY ONCE MORE.
FOR NOW, THE DROUGHT INTENSIFIES.
(dramatic music plays)

The scene changes to the Vazantes.

The Narrator continues IN THE VAZANTES, ALL THE WATER
HOLES HAVE DRIED UP.

A colourful parrot flies by, splaying out a huge tail and landing on a
tree stump. A female coati hunts for fruit at the top of a huge palm
tree. Parrots eat the fruit too. A dark brown male coati climbs down the palm.
[squawking]

The Narrator continues LIFE FOR MANY ANIMALS WOULD BE
IMPOSSIBLE WERE IT NOT FOR ONE SPECIAL TREE.
EVEN IN THE TOUGHEST DROUGHT,
ACURI PALMS PRODUCE AN
ABUNDANCE OF FRUIT.
AND IT'S NOT JUST COATIS
ENJOYING THE FEAST.
BUT THIS MALE COATI ISN'T
INTERESTED IN FOOD.
HE REALLY WANTS TO MATE.
(dramatic music plays)
[raspy grunts]
HAVING LOST A FIGHT TO A RIVAL,
HE'S NO LONGER ALLOWED ANYWHERE
NEAR THE FEMALES.
THE CHANCES OF HIM BREEDING AT
ALL THIS YEAR ARE GETTING SLIMMER.
FOR THE INTRUDER, THINGS LOOK
VERY DIFFERENT.
(mating noises)
HE NOW HAS ACCESS TO LOTS OF FEMALES.
BUT FOR THEM, MATING CAN BE A
PAINFUL AFFAIR.
AND IF THE MALE'S TOO ROUGH,
HE'S SWIFTLY PUNISHED.

The female attacks the male. All the females chase the male away.
[fierce squeaking and grunting]

The Narrator continues THE FEMALES HAVE PUSHED THE
INTRUDER AWAY.
THIS COULD BE THE CHANCE THE
DARK MALE HAS BEEN WAITING FOR.

The dark male approaches.
[grunting]

The Narrator continues NOW HE'S THE ONE WHO HAS NOTHING TO LOSE.

The two males face off against each other, circling. The lighter
coloured one pretends to run away, then wheels and attacks the other.
[menacing grunts]

The Narrator continues BUT IF HE THOUGHT HIS RIVAL
WOULD JUST GIVE UP, HE'S MISTAKEN.
A STANDOFF... AGAIN. WITH EVERYTHING TO PLAY FOR.
(dramatic music plays)
THE FIGHT HAS COST THE DARK
MALE A NASTY CUT ON HIS NOSE.
BUT HE'S WON BACK THE AFFECTION
OF HIS FEMALES AND THE CHANCE
TO FATHER A NEW GENERATION.

Seen through heat haze, a family of coatis forages, with tails up,
in the high grass.

The Narrator continues AS THE DAYS PASS, THE
TEMPERATURE RISES FURTHER.
IN SOME PLACES, THE LAND IS NOW
BECOMING DANGEROUSLY DRY.

The satellite view homes in on Brazil. In a ground-level view, dry
grassland features large anthills.

The Narrator continues ALMOST A QUARTER OF THIS VAST
COUNTRY IS COVERED IN SAVANNAH,
TWO MILLION SQUARE KILOMETRES
OF GRASSLAND... THE BRAZILIAN "CERRADO."
IT'S ONE OF THE OLDEST AND MOST
DIVERSE TROPICAL ECOSYSTEMS ON THE PLANET.
A THIRD OF ALL BRAZILIAN SPECIES LIVE HERE.

A fast clip shows many different hungry and exhausted species.

The Narrator continues DROUGHT HAS DRIED THESE GRASSES TO A CRISP.
NOW, THIS ENTIRE LANDSCAPE IS A TINDERBOX.
ALL OF THE ANIMALS HERE ARE
ADAPTED TO SURVIVE IN THESE HARSH CONDITIONS.
BUT THERE'S ONE FORCE OF NATURE
THAT NO CREATURE CAN SURVIVE.

An anteater raises its long nose, sniffing. Smoke covers the grassland. Fires
rage, consuming dry vegetation and trees.
[fire crackling]
[tense music]

The Narrator continues THUNDERSTORMS CAN CREATE
LIGHTNING WITHOUT RAIN. ONE STRIKE IS ALL IT TAKES.
[fire roaring, crackling]
AT THE HEIGHT OF THE DRY
SEASON, HUNDREDS OF FIRES A DAY
MAY BURN ACROSS BRAZIL.
(dramatic suspenseful music plays)
[fire roaring, crackling]
ONCE THEY'VE STARTED, THESE
FIRES CAN TAKE ON A MOMENTUM
ALL OF THEIR OWN.
[squawking)

Alarmed birds fly around in circles. Fires rage, then slowly subside. The
sun appears through the smoke. Animals wade through ashes.

The Narrator continues SLOWLY, THE ANIMALS RETURN.
BUT THEIR HOME HAS BEEN TURNED TO ASH.
THEY'VE SURVIVED THE FIRE, BUT
HOW LONG CAN THEY SURVIVE NOW?
AT THE HEIGHT OF THE FIRE
SEASON, MUCH OF BRAZIL WAKES TO BLOOD-RED SKIES.
LANDSCAPES HUNDREDS OF
KILOMETRES AWAY ARE BATHED IN EERIE LIGHT.
(gentle tinkling guitar music plays)

The scene changes to the Pantanal. Butterflies and other insects mill around.

The Narrator continues THE PANTANAL HAS ESCAPED THE
FLAMES, BUT HERE, MOST OF THE
RIVERS ARE NOW BARELY RECOGNIZABLE.
(jaguar panting)
IT'S AT THIS TOUGHEST TIME OF
THE YEAR THAT THE FEMALE JAGUAR
IS READY FOR MATING.
FINALLY, THE MALE'S SEARCH IS OVER.
(mating sounds)
THEY'LL MATE REPEATEDLY OVER
THE NEXT FEW DAYS.

Once mating is accomplished, the female runs away, growling. The pair of
cats then stays together.
[ferocious growling]

The Narrator continues UNTIL RECENTLY, JAGUARS WERE
THOUGHT OF AS SOLITARY, ONLY
EVER GETTING TOGETHER BRIEFLY.
BUT THE JAGUARS IN THE PANTANAL
ARE NOW REVEALING A DIFFERENT
SIDE TO THESE CATS.
THIS PAIR MAY STAY TOGETHER FOR
WEEKS, OR EVEN MONTHS.

The scene changes to canyon land. The female monkey appears.

The Narrator continues IN THE CANYON LANDS, THE
DROUGHT HAS REACHED ITS HEIGHT.
IT'S BEEN FOUR DAYS SINCE THIS
FEMALE FIRST SET EYES ON THE
OBJECT OF HER DESIRE.
SHE'S BEEN PURSUING HIM
RELENTLESSLY, AND HE'S
STUBBORNLY IGNORED HER.
TODAY, HER WORLD HAS CHANGED.

She searches through his fur for parasites. Then he grooms her.
[soft chirps]

The Narrator continues AT LAST, HE'S ALLOWED HER TO GROOM HIM.
AND, FOR THE FIRST TIME, HER
AFFECTIONS ARE RETURNED.
THEY MOVE AWAY FROM THE REST
OF THE TROOP.
IT'S TIME FOR A LITTLE PRIVACY.
(mating sounds)
SHE IS EXHAUSTED.
AND HE IS A CHANGED MALE.
THIS LITTLE ONE WON'T BE THE
TROOP'S YOUNGEST FOR MUCH LONGER.
(epic music plays)

Clips show the different scenarios.

The Narrator continues ALL OF OUR ANIMAL FAMILIES HAVE
SURVIVED THIS SEASON OF DROUGHT
AND FIRE...
DRAWING ON THEIR RESILIENCE,
INGENUITY, AND TEAMWORK.
SOON, THE RAINS WILL RETURN.
AND WITH THE HARSH DAYS OF
DROUGHT OVER, BRAZIL WILL BURST
INTO LIFE ONCE MORE.

A speeded-motion clip shows rainclouds rolling over the landscape.
[thunder rumbles]
(epic music in crescendo)

The Narrator continues THIS LAND OF EXTREMES HAS SWUNG
FROM FLOOD TO FIRE, AND THESE
ANIMALS HAVE DONE MORE THAN JUST SURVIVE HERE.
THEY'VE FLOURISHED... THEY'VE NURTURED... THEY'VE GROWN.
AND NOW, A NEW GENERATION IS ON ITS WAY.
THEY, TOO, WILL HAVE TO FIND
THEIR WAY IN THIS EXTRAORDINARY COUNTRY.

The camera pans out from a jaguar couple sleeping at the foot of a tree.

(theme music plays)

The end credits roll.

Directed and Produced by Adam White.

Producer, Joe Stevens.

Edited by Andy Mort.

Production Manager, Kerry Laughton-McConnon.

B.B.C. Earth logo. 2014.