Transcript: Ep. 3 - Mont Saint-Hilaire | Oct 18, 2016

A Male Narrator says ANNEMARIE ROTH
OPERATES A CENTER
FOR INJURED BIRDS
NEAR MONT SAINT-HILAIRE, ABOUT
30 KILOMETRES EAST OF MONTREAL.

[bird calls]
Annemarie Roth walks towards an aviary in the woods. She is in her sixties with gray hair in a short ponytail. She wears glasses, black trousers and a blue jacket.

Annemarie says YEAH - YOU'RE A GOOD MOM!

[dogs bark]

The Narrator says OVER THE PAST 50 YEARS,
ANNEMARIE HAS WATCHED
AS THE CITY
HAS ENVELOPED
THE LAND AROUND HER -
CUTTING HER OFF FROM
THE MOUNTAIN SHE LOVES,
TURNING ORCHARDS AND FORESTS
INTO SUBDIVISIONS,
AND JEOPARDIZING
THE REHABILITATION CENTRE.

The caption changes to "Annemarie Roth. Wildlife Rehabilitator, Care and Rehabilitation of Injured Birds."

Annemarie says THE CAGES WERE
RIGHT NEXT TO THE DEVELOPMENT,
AND I REMEMBER AT THE TIME
WE HAD SIX GREAT GREY
OWLS IN THAT CAGE.
I HAD TO REMOVE THEM,
THEY WERE JUST
SO FRIGHTENED AND STRESSED
FROM LAWN MOWERS,
AND CHILDREN PLAYING,
SWIMMING POOLS, MUSIC.
I MEAN, PEOPLE OF COURSE
WANT TO DO THAT
AND THEY SHOULD BE DOING THAT,
BUT IT WAS NOT GOOD
FOR US HERE.

An owl sits on a branch inside a cage.

The Narrator says UNFORTUNATELY
FOR THE REHABILITATION CENTRE,
THE HOUSES ARE HERE TO STAY.
BUT IF THERE'S
ANYWHERE IN CANADA
WITH A SHOT AT FIGURING OUT
HOW TO STRIKE A BALANCE
BETWEEN PEOPLE AND NATURE,
IT'S HERE
AT MONT SAINT-HILAIRE -
CANADA'S VERY FIRST
UNESCO BIOSPHERE RESERVE.

(theme music plays)

The Narrator says BIOSPHERE RESERVES
ARE REGIONS
OF GLOBAL ECOLOGICAL
SIGNIFICANCE,
THAT MAKE
AN ON-GOING COMMITMENT
TO THE UNITED NATIONS
TO STRIVE FOR SUSTAINABILITY.
THEY ARE NOT PARKS,
AND THEY HAVE
NO LEGAL AUTHORITY.
THEY ARE PLACES WHERE PEOPLE
ARE INSPIRED TO FIND WAYS
TO LIVE AND WORK
IN HARMONY WITH NATURE.
THIS SERIES EXPLORES
WHAT'S HAPPENING
IN CANADA'S
BIOSPHERE RESERVES -
THE SUCCESSES
AND THE CHALLENGES
OF PEOPLE DETERMINED
TO CREATE A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
FOR THEIR COMMUNITIES.
COME WITH US
ON A COAST-TO-COAST ADVENTURE
SPANNING THOUSANDS OF YEARS,
AND IT JUST MIGHT CHANGE
THE WAY YOU THINK
ABOUT THE ENVIRONMENT
AND OUR PLACE IN IT.

A fast-motion clip shows northern lights, flock of white birds, woods, mountains, a port, people trekking, sailing and working with various animals.

Against a beach, the title of the show reads "Striking Balance. Mont Saint-Hilaire Biosphere Reserve. Narrated by Jim Cuddy."

The Narrator says THERE'S NO PLACE
MORE SYMBOLIC
OF THE TENSION BETWEEN
PEOPLE AND NATURE
IN MONT SAINT-HILAIRE
THAN AN URBAN PARK
ON THE EDGE OF THE MOUNTAIN
KNOWN AS THE FOYER SAVOY.

A plate on a rock appears.

The Narrator continues THE NEARBY CLIFFS
ARE ONE OF THE BEST
BREEDING HABITATS IN QUEBEC
FOR THE PEREGRINE FALCON.
ALMOST WIPED OUT BY DDT,
ONE OF THE FIRST BREEDING
PAIRS TO RE-ESTABLISH IN QUEBEC
WAS FOUND HERE
BY ANNEMARIE ROTH IN 1987,
AT THE SAME TIME
THAT DEVELOPMENT WAS RAMPING UP
AROUND THE MOUNTAIN.
ANNEMARIE ALSO FOUND
THAT CLIMBERS AND HIKERS
WERE DISTURBING
THE NESTING BIRDS,
PUTTING THEIR YOUNG IN PERIL.

Annemarie uses binoculars to watch a falcon flying.

Annemarie says IT JUST KILLED ME TO WATCH THAT
SO I WENT UP
AND I TOLD THEM NICELY
TO JUST COME OFF THE CLIFFS.
SOME OF THEM DID,
WERE NICE ENOUGH,
AND OTHERS JUST IGNORED IT.
I HAD UM, NASTY ENCOUNTERS,
I HAVE TO SAY,
TO MAKE IT - TO PUT IT MILDLY.

(soft music plays)

The Narrator says IN MONT SAINT-HILAIRE,
THIS DEDICATION TO NATURE
IS HARDLY UNIQUE TO ANNEMARIE.
IT'S EASY TO BE INSPIRED
BY THIS MOUNTAIN,
WHICH TOWERS AN
IMPRESSIVE 400 METERS ABOVE
THE ST. LAWRENCE LOWLANDS.
THE PEAKS FEED
A PRISTINE GLACIAL LAKE
WHICH IS SURROUNDED
BY THE LARGEST REMNANT
OF OLD GROWTH FOREST
IN THE MONTREAL REGION.
IN 1978 THE MOUNTAIN BECAME
THE CORE PROTECTED AREA
OF THE FIRST BIOSPHERE
RESERVE IN CANADA;
WHICH ALSO INCLUDES
THE SURROUNDING FARMLANDS,
FORESTS, ORCHARDS, TOWNS
AND EVEN SUBDIVISIONS.

An animated map of the zone appears. A dialog box pointing to a yellow area reads "Mont Saint-Hilaire Biosphere Reserve."

The Narrator continues PEOPLE HERE HAVE
LONG BEEN WILLING TO DREAM BIG
AND TAKE CHANCES
TO PRESERVE THEIR MOUNTAIN
FOR ALL TIME TO COME.
BUT HOW PEOPLE HAVE BEEN
PROTECTING THE MOUNTAIN
HAS SHIFTED OVER TIME,
IN SURPRISING WAYS.
TO EXPLORE THE STORY
OF MONT SAINT-HILAIRE,
IS TO EXPLORE THE EVOLUTION
OF CONSERVATION IN CANADA,
AND TO CHALLENGE
THE CONVENTIONS OF NATURE
AND WILDLIFE PROTECTION.

A stream runs among trees. Snow covers the land.

The Narrator continues THIS IS IN SOME WAYS
A SMALL STORY,
BUT IT HAS BIG IMPLICATIONS
FOR PEOPLE EVERYWHERE
TRYING TO PRESERVE NATURE
IN THE FACE OF INCREASING
HUMAN POPULATIONS.
THE STORY OF PEOPLE'S
RELATIONSHIP
TO MONT SAINT-HILAIRE
BEGINS WITH THE ABENAKI
FIRST NATIONS PEOPLE,
WHO CALL THE MOUNTAIN
"WIGWAMODENSIS."
OR "THE BIG HOUSE."

A colourful drawing of two local tribe men appears.

The Narrator says ORAL HISTORY
INDICATES THE MOUNTAIN
WAS A PLACE
OF SPIRITUAL IMPORTANCE,
AS WELL AS SERVING
AS A LOOKOUT SPOT;
AND SOME EVIDENCE EXISTS
OF ANCIENT MAPLE SUGAR CAMPS
AT THE MOUNTAIN'S BASE.
MONT SAINT-HILAIRE EXPERIENCED
ITS FIRST POPULATION BOOM
BACK IN THE LATE 1600S,
WHEN THE REGION WAS PURCHASED
FOR FRENCH SETTLEMENT
BY A SEIGNEUR,
AS PART OF
A SEMI-FEUDAL SYSTEM
PREVALENT THROUGHOUT QUEBEC.
SETTLERS RECEIVED
LONG STRIPS OF LAND
EXTENDING OUT FROM
BUT WHILE MUCH OF THE LAND
ALONG THE RIVER
WAS QUICKLY CLEARED
FOR AGRICULTURE,
THE MOUNTAIN ITSELF
HAD A DIFFERENT FATE.

Several paintings show first settlers and their cabins.

The caption changes to "Kees Vanderheyden. Former Director, Mont Saint-Hilaire Nature Centre." Kees sits in a living room. He is in his sixties, clean-shaven with receding wavy gray hair. He wears glasses, blue pullover and a shirt.

Kees says THEY DISCOVERED
THAT ON THE MOUNTAIN,
AT LEAST HALF OF ALL THE TREES
WERE MAPLE TREES.
AH!
SO IT WAS A PLACE
NOT ONLY FOR MAPLE SYRUP,
BUT MAPLE SUGAR.
AND MAPLE SUGAR
WAS EXTREMELY IMPORTANT
BECAUSE THE ONLY
SUGAR THEY HAD
CAME FROM
THE CARIBBEAN ISLANDS.
SO, THE SEIGNEURS,
THEY ALLOWED THE PEOPLE
TO HAVE LITTLE LOTS
AROUND THE LAKE
AND ON THE FOOT
OF THE MOUNTAIN ALSO
TO BUILD LITTLE CABINS
AND THEY WOULD MAKE SUGAR.
BUT THEN THEY DISCOVERED
ON THE FLANKS OF THE MOUNTAIN,
APPLE TREES.
AH!
THEY WERE WILD TREES
BUT THEY STARTED IMPORTING
BITS OF TREES
TO PRODUCE OTHER TREES.
SO THE APPLE INDUSTRY
BECAME EXTREMELY IMPORTANT.
IN BEGINNING THEY PLANTED
ABOUT SIX THOUSAND TREES,
IT WENT UP TO
SIXTY THOUSAND TREES.
SO FOR THEM BASICALLY
IT WAS AN ECONOMIC ASSET.
OF COURSE
THEY LIKED NATURE ALSO.

Old footage shows two men boiling a substance and pouring it into several square molds, and a girl collecting apples from a tree.

The Narrator says THE SEIGNEURS
ALLOWED PEOPLE TO USE
THE MOUNTAIN
FOR INCOME AND PLEASURE,
BUT THEY CLEARLY
THOUGHT OF THE MOUNTAIN
AS A SPECIAL PLACE
THAT NEEDED PROTECTION.

The caption changes to "Pierre Lambert. Historian." Pierre is in his mid-sixties, with a white beard and receding white hair. He wears glasses and a brown zip sweater.

Pierre speaks French. Subtitles read "When the Hertel seigneurs arrived on the great territory that lies here the Hertel seigneurs saw the great beauty of this mountain and they absolutely wanted to protect it."

The Narrator says HUNTING AND FIRES
WERE FORBIDDEN ON THE MOUNTAIN,
AND LOGGING WAS ONLY ALLOWED
IN VERY LIMITED AMOUNTS.
TO ENFORCE THE RULES,
THE SEIGNEURS HAD GATE KEEPERS,
OR GUARDIANS,
WHO PATROLLED THE MOUNTAIN.

Pierre says ABOVE ALL, WHAT CONCERNED
THEM VERY MUCH AS THE PROTECTION
AGAINST FIRES.
THE SEIGNEURS WERE TREMENDOUSLY
SCARED THAT THERE
WOULD BE FIRES ON THE MOUNTAIN.

The Narrator says WAS ALSO ECONOMIC -
KEEPING THE HIGH VALUE,
OLD GROWTH TREES STANDING
WAS LIKE KEEPING
MONEY IN THE BANK -
THEIR VALUE ONLY INCREASED
AS THE FORESTS
AROUND THE MOUNTAIN
WERE CONVERTED INTO FIELDS.

Pierre says YES, IT’S TRUE.
THE SEIGNEURS, HERTEL AND
CAMPBELL, WERE MAYBE
THE FIRST ENVIRONMENTALISTS
BECAUSE THEY QUICKLY REALIZED
THE VALUE OF THE NATURE
ALL AROUND THEM.

A drawing of a man with long curly wig and a portrait of a man wearing sideburns appear on split screens against a background of mountains.

The Narrator says THE SECOND SEIGNEURS
TO OWN THE MOUNTAIN
WERE THE CAMPBELLS,
WHO WERE FRIENDS
WITH A WEALTHY FAMILY
FROM MONTREAL, THE GAULTS.
THE GAULTS WOULD OFTEN
VISIT THE CAMPBELLS
AT MONT SAINT-HILAIRE,
WHICH IS HOW A YOUNG
ANDREW HAMILTON-GAULT
WAS INTRODUCED
TO THE MOUNTAIN.

A black and white picture of a couple appears.

Kees says WHAT HE FOUND
IS A BEAUTIFUL PLACE.
A FOREST WITH ANIMALS
AND GLORIOUS SUMMERS -
IT WAS SO NICE.
HE HAD THE DREAM.
HIS DREAM WAS TO
SOMEDAY PERHAPS
TO LIVE ON THIS MOUNTAIN.
WELL, TO LIVE ON A MOUNTAIN
HE HAD TO BUY IT.
IN THE BEGINNING
HE DIDN'T HAVE THE MONEY.
AND HIS DAD WAS WISE ENOUGH,
HE DIDN'T WANT HIS SON
TO HAVE ANY OF HIS HERITAGE
BEFORE HE HAD LEARNED
TO BECOME
AN ADMINISTRATOR.
SO, HE HAD TO PASS
THE TEST OF AN ADMINISTRATOR
WORKING IN AN OFFICE
WHICH HE DIDN'T LIKE.
BUT ANYWAY,
FINALLY HE PASSED THE TEST.
HE DID BUY THE PLACE
FROM THE CAMPBELLS IN 1913
FOR THIRTY THOUSAND DOLLARS.
WHICH APPARENTLY
WAS A FORTUNE AT THE TIME.
BUT, HE HIS REAL CAREER,
WAS NOT IN ADMINISTRATION,
IT WAS AS A SOLDIER.

The Narrator says GAULT BECAME
A DECORATED CAREER SOLDIER,
PERSONALLY RAISING
AND FINANCING
THE PRINCESS PATRICIA'S
LIGHT INFANTRY REGIMENT
TO FIGHT
IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR.

[machine gun fire, explosions]
A black and white clip shows soldiers marching and mines exploding.

The Narrator continues GAULT HELPED LEAD
HIS REGIMENT INTO BATTLE
AND EXPERIENCED FIRST-HAND
THE HORRORS OF WAR,
BY LOSING A LEG
AND WITNESSING THE DEATHS
OF NEARLY 90 PERCENT
OF HIS REGIMENT.
AFTER THE WAR
HE BECAME A MEMBER
OF THE BRITISH PARLIAMENT,
AND DURING
THE SECOND WORLD WAR
HE TRAINED CANADIAN SOLDIERS
FOR BATTLE IN EUROPE.
THROUGHOUT HIS LIFE,
THE MOUNTAIN WAS ALWAYS
GAULT'S REFUGE,
AND HE PROTECTED IT
WITH PROHIBITIONS
AGAINST FIRE AND HUNTING
IN A SIMILAR FASHION
TO THE SEIGNEURS
THAT HAD COME BEFORE HIM.
AFTER WORLD WAR TWO,
GAULT DECIDED TO RETIRE
AT MONT SAINT-HILAIRE,
HIS RETIREMENT MANSION,
WHEN HE WAS DIAGNOSED
WITH TERMINAL CANCER.
HE WAS ONLY ABLE TO LIVE
IN HIS NEW HOME FOR THREE WEEKS
BEFORE BEING ADMITTED
TO HOSPITAL.
GAULT HAD NO CHILDREN,
AND ONE OF HIS FINAL CONCERNS
WAS THE FATE OF HIS
"MOST VALUED POSSESSION."

Clips show the experiences lived by Gault.

Kees says HIS WORRY WAS
"WHAT IS GOING TO HAPPEN
TO MY MOUNTAIN?"
SO, HE DECIDED
TO FIND SOMEBODY
WHO WOULD TAKE CARE OF IT.
AND HE WAS REMINDED ALL
OF A SUDDEN HIS FATHER
WAS A GREAT FRIEND,
OF THE CHANCELLOR
OF MCGILL UNIVERSITY.
SO HE WENT TO SEE
THE CHANCELLOR.
HE SAID - LISTEN,
I HAVE A GORGEOUS MOUNTAIN.
I'D BE GLAD
TO BEQUEATH IT TO YOU.
BUT, DON'T TOUCH.
I'LL GIVE IT
IF YOU DON'T TOUCH IT,
IF YOU KEEP IT NATURAL.
BUT, USE IT ALSO
TO ALLOW THE YOUTH OF CANADA
TO DISCOVER NATURE.
SO, MCGILL AGREED
AND MCGILL
HAD A MOUNTAIN.

An aerial view shows pink, yellow and green vegetation ona range of mountains.

The Narrator says THE 1958 DONATION
OF MONT SAINT-HILAIRE TO MCGILL
WAS AN UNUSUAL GIFT,
AND THE UNIVERSITY DIDN'T
REALLY KNOW WHAT TO DO
WITH WHAT THEY CALLED
"THE GAULT ESTATE."
THE BOTANISTS AND ECOLOGISTS
WANTED TO PRESERVE IT
FOR ECOLOGICAL RESEARCH.
THE PSYCHOLOGISTS WANTED
THE RESERVE FOR RESEARCH
INTO THE HEALING
POWER OF NATURE.
THERE WAS A GROUP
THAT WANTED TO OPEN A SKI HILL.
AND THE DEPARTMENT
OF WOODLOT MANAGEMENT
WONDERED IF MAYBE IT
SHOULDN'T BE LOGGED?

The caption changes to "Doctor Martin J. Lechowicz. Professor, Department of Biology, McGill University, Former Director Gault Nature Reserve." Martin is in his early sixties, with a beard and wavy white hair. He wears glasses and an ivory polo-shirt.

Martin says TO A FORESTER,
THIS OLD GROWTH FOREST,
SO VALUABLE TO AN ECOLOGIST,
IS A KIND OF TRAVESTY,
THESE TREES
ARE OLD AND BEAT UP.
THEY SHOULD HAVE BEEN LOGGED
AND TURNED INTO TIMBER -
WE NEED TO REGENERATE
THIS FOREST.
SO YOU HAD REALLY CONFLICTING
VIEWS OF THE VALUE
AND THE NATURE,
OF THIS PLACE.

The Narrator says PRESERVATION
NEARLY SUCCUMBED TO PROGRESS
WHEN THE UNIVERSITY OPENED
A SAND AND GRAVEL PIT
ON THE EDGE OF THE MOUNTAIN
TO HELP PAY THE BILLS
OF THE ESTATE,
WITH THE AGGREGATE GOING
TO BUILD A NEW NEARBY HIGHWAY.

A clip shows heavy machinery working in a field and carrying dirt.

Martin says THE NEIGHBOURS SAID
WAIT A MINUTE.
YOU KNOW MR. GAULT
WAS A RESPECTFUL NEIGHBOUR
IT WAS A NICE PLACE
HE LET US PICK WILD FLOWERS
AND COME ON THE MOUNTAIN.
THERE WAS AN UNDERSTANDING
ABOUT THE MOUNTAIN.
WHAT ARE YOU DOING
DISHONORING HIS MEMORY?
WHAT ARE YOU DOING
WITH ALL THIS DUST AND NOISE?
AND SO THE UNIVERSITY
BACKED OFF
AND SAID THAT WASN'T
SUCH A GOOD IDEA.
SO, LITTLE THINGS
SOMETIMES TIP THE BALANCE
TOWARD THE PRESERVATION.

The Narrator says THE ECOLOGISTS
EVENTUALLY WON OUT
WHEN THE UNIVERSITY DECIDED
TO KEEP THE MOUNTAIN INTACT
FOR USE AS A BIOLOGICAL
FIELD STATION.

The caption changes to "David Maneli. Conservation and Academic Affairs Administrator, Gault Nature Reserve, McGill University." David is in his mid-thirties, clean-shaven with wavy brown hair. He wears a black jacket over a blue polo-shirt.

David stands by a white glass type of dome in the woods and says HERE THE STUDENTS CAN HAVE
A CHANCE TO PRACTICE
IDENTIFYING PLANTS
OR LEARNING ABOUT NATURE
AND EXPERIENCING NATURE
AND GETTING TO KNOW
AND ENJOYING SCIENCE.

Now, David stands in a room.

He says AND WHAT WE HAVE
HERE IS OUR HERBARIUM
AND IT IS REALLY
A TESTAMENT OF THE RICHNESS
OF ALL THE RESEARCH
AND SCIENCE
THAT HAS BEEN GOING ON HERE.
THIS ONE IS FROM 1963.
WE HAVE MORE THAN 600
SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
THROUGHOUT THE YEARS,
WHICH IS HUGE, INTENSE.
WE'RE IN THE 1,000S OR 10,000S
OR EVEN MORE PEOPLE
THAT HAVE COME HERE,
DID THEIR SCIENCE,
AND WERE TOUCHED
BY THE RESERVE.
AND IN QUEBEC THERE'S
NO OTHER PLACE LIKE THAT.

The Narrator says THE UNIVERSITY WAS
EXCELLENT AT MANAGING RESEARCH,
BUT IT WAS LESS ADEPT
AT MANAGING PUBLIC ACCESS,
AND BY THE LATE SIXTIES,
THE JOB OF PROTECTING
THE MOUNTAIN
WAS BECOMING MORE COMPLICATED.
A MAJOR ECONOMIC BOOM
CULMINATING IN "EXPO 67,"
CANADA'S MASSIVE 100TH
BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION.

(music plays)
A black and white clip shows people dancing atop large white letters that read "Expo 67," sport activities and fireworks.

Martin says SO AFTER EXPO,
YOU ALSO WERE ON A RUN
OF URBAN EXPANSION.
AND THE VILLAGE
OF MOUNT SAINT-HILAIRE,
A QUIET LITTLE VILLAGE,
WAS CLEARLY RIPE
FOR DEVELOPMENT.
THIS REALLY
BECAME AN ISSUE
LOOMING ON THE HORIZON.

The Narrator says TO HELP PRESERVE THE MOUNTAIN
AS THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE
LIVING AROUND IT INCREASED,
THE UNIVERSITY DECIDED
TO SPLIT IT INTO TWO PARTS -
ONE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC,
THE OTHER PROTECTED
FOR NATURE AND RESEARCH.

The animated map appears. A yellow area reads "Public use" and a green area next to it reads "Preservation area."

The Narrator continues TO HELP MANAGE THE PUBLIC'S
INTERACTION WITH MOUNTAIN,
THEY CREATED A NON-PROFIT,
THE MONT SAINT-HILAIRE
NATURE CENTRE,
AND RECRUITED ALICE JOHANNSEN
TO RUN IT.
ALICE WAS THE FORMER CURATOR
OF MCGILL'S REDPATH MUSEUM
IN MONTREAL,
BUT SHE HAD DEVELOPED
A PASSION FOR NATURE
THROUGH HER FATHER,
"JACKRABBIT JOHANNSEN,"
THE MAN CREDITED WITH BRINGING
CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING TO CANADA.

Several pictures show a woman in an office, the same woman standing next to an old man, and people skiing.

Martin says HE IMBUED IN HIS TWO DAUGHTERS,
IN ALICE VERY MUCH,
A LOVE OF NATURE
AND A DESIRE TO BRING NATURE
TO OTHER PEOPLE,
TO CITY PEOPLE.
AND SHE WAS VERY QUICKLY
IN THOSE EARLY EARTH DAY YEARS
ABLE TO RAISE THE MONEY
TO BUILD THE PAVILION,
AND TO ESTABLISH
THE PROGRAMS OF OUTREACH
THAT CHARACTERIZED
THE NATURE CENTRE.

The Narrator says ALICE JOHANNSEN
QUICKLY BECAME FRIENDS
WITH ONE OF THE MOUNTAIN'S
DAILY HIKERS - ANNEMARIE ROTH.

Annemarie says WHENEVER SHE CAME HERE
SHE WOULD HOWL
SHE WOULD ALWAYS GO "HOW!"
THAT WAS HER,
[LAUGHS] HER TRADEMARK,
TO ANNOUNCE HERSELF
WAS TO HOWL.
SO SHE WAS ALWAYS
FULL OF SPUNK,
BUT SHE WAS ALWAYS SO BUSY,
HAD SO VERY LITTLE TIME
AND THAT, I REGRET IT.
BUT WE HAD AT TIMES -
WALKS TOGETHER,
HIKES TOGETHER.
SHE WANTED THE PEOPLE
TO LEARN ABOUT
THE MOUNTAIN -
ITS HISTORY,
ABOUT THE NATURAL HISTORY.
HER WHOLE LIFE
WAS CONSERVATION.

The Narrator says ALWAYS ON
THE LOOKOUT FOR NEW WAYS
TO PROMOTE AND PROTECT
MONT SAINT-HILAIRE,
ALICE WAS INTRIGUED BY
A NEW CONCEPT IN CONSERVATION
COMING OUT
OF THE UNITED NATIONS -
THE BIOSPHERE RESERVE.

A green document reads "Unesco. MAB. Programme on Man and the Biosphere."

Martin says BY THE 1960S,
WITH THE OBVIOUS IMPACTS
OF DDT ESPECIALLY,
THE PUBLIC BEGAN TO REALIZE
THAT MAYBE LIVING WITH CHEMISTRY
HAD ITS LIMITS.

The caption changes to "Marc-André Guertin. Member, Canadian Man and the Biosphere Committee, Canadian Commission for UNESCO." Marc is in his mid-forties with a beard and brown hair. He wears a gray scarf and a blue jacket.

Marc says IT WAS GETTING MORE OBVIOUS
THAT WE HAD AN AFFECT ON NATURE
BUT WE ALSO DEPENDED ON NATURE
FOR ALL OF THE SERVICES
IT PROVIDES
AND WE NEEDED
TO TRY TO DOCUMENT
OUR RELATIONSHIP TO NATURE,
OUR DEPENDENCY ON NATURE
AND HOW ACTUALLY
ECOSYSTEMS FUNCTIONED
AND HOW ECOSYSTEM FUNCTIONS
WERE ALTERED
BY THE HUMAN ACTIVITY.

A black and white clip shows a herd of deer and a man activating a controlled explosion.

The Narrator says BIOSPHERE RESERVES,
WHICH EMERGED AS PART
OF UNESCO'S "MAN AND THE
BIOSPHERE" PROGRAM,
WERE DESIGNED TO ACT
AS PERMANENT REFERENCE SITES,
WITH CORE AREAS
THAT REPRESENTED INTACT EXAMPLES
OF ALL OF THE EARTH'S
ECOSYSTEMS
THAT SCIENTISTS COULD USE
AS BLUEPRINTS FOR UNDERSTANDING,
AND ULTIMATELY REPAIRING
HUMAN DAMAGE TO THE EARTH.
THERE WERE ALSO TO BE AREAS
IN A BIOSPHERE RESERVE
THAT INCLUDED PEOPLE,
THAT SCIENTISTS COULD USE
TO UNDERSTAND THE EFFECTS
OF HUMAN ACTIVITY
ON THE EARTH'S ECOSYSTEMS.
ALICE THOUGHT THAT
WHAT UNESCO WAS PROPOSING
FOR A BIOSPHERE RESERVE
SOUNDED AN AWFUL LOT
LIKE MONT SAINT-HILAIRE -
A RARE OLD GROWTH FOREST
MANAGED BY A UNIVERSITY
BUFFERED BY A FARMING COMMUNITY
THAT WAS THREATENED
BY SUBURBAN EXPANSION.
SO ALICE CONTACTED
DR. PATRICIA ROBERTS-PICHETTE,
THE ENVIRONMENT
CANADA SCIENTIST
RESPONSIBLE FOR THE MAN
AND THE BIOSPHERE PROGRAM,
TO VOLUNTEER
MONT SAINT-HILAIRE
AS A GUINEA-PIG FOR THIS NEW
EXPERIMENT IN CONSERVATION.

The caption changes to "Doctor Patricia Roberts-Pichette. Former Executive Secretary, Canadian MAB Secretariat." Patricia is in her sixties with combed gay hair. She wears a blue blazer over a white sweater.

Patricia says I HAD SEVERAL TRIPS
TO MOUNT SAINT-HILAIRE
AND IT WAS VERY
CLEAR TO ME THAT YES,
MOUNT SAINT-HILAIRE
WOULD MAKE A VERY GOOD PART
OF A BIOSPHERE RESERVE.
IT HAD A PROTECTED AREA.
IT HAD AN EXCELLENT
ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION PROGRAM,
WHICH ALICE RAN.

A close-up shot shows a typed document.

The Narrator says WITH PATRICIA'S SUPPORT,
ALICE WROTE A SUBMISSION
TO UNESCO FOR APPROVAL,
AND IN AUGUST OF 1978,
THERE WAS A CEREMONY
BESIDE GAULT'S MEMORIAL PLAQUE
AT LAC HERTEL,
DESIGNATION
AS CANADA'S FIRST
BIOSPHERE RESERVE.

Kees says I THINK
THE GREATEST THING ALICE DID
WAS TO OBTAIN THE STATUS
OF A BIOSPHERE RESERVE.
BECAUSE SHE DISCOVERED THAT
THIS PLACE WAS THE ONLY PLACE
IN THE WHOLE VALLEY
THAT STILL HAD
THE SAME ORIGINAL FORESTS
WITH ALL ITS WEALTH THAT YOU
COULDN'T FIND ANYWHERE ELSE.
SO MONT SAINT-HILAIRE
BECAME THE HEART, THE CENTER,
OF THE FIRST
BIOSPHERE RESERVE IN CANADA.

The Narrator says UNFORTUNATELY,
WAS SHORT LIVED.
BY THE LATE EIGHTIES,
ALICE HAD RETIRED,
AND THE GOVERNMENT GRANTS
THAT HAD SUPPORTED THE CENTRE
DRIED UP -
LEAVING IT IN DEBT
AND FORCING THE CANCELLATION
OF ITS PUBLIC
EDUCATION PROGRAMS.
MCGILL, ITSELF
IN FINANCIAL DIFFICULTY,
WAS CONSIDERING SELLING
OR GIVING AWAY THE MOUNTAIN
FOR SOMEONE ELSE
TO LOOK AFTER.
THE BIOSPHERE RESERVE
DESIGNATION
BECAME AN HONORIFIC,
WITH LITTLE SIGNIFICANCE
ON THE MOUNTAIN
OR IN THE SURROUNDING
COMMUNITY.
BUT AROUND THE SAME TIME,
AT THE INTERNATIONAL LEVEL,
THERE WAS A CHANGE
IN DIRECTION
FOR BIOSPHERE RESERVES.
ONCE A CONCEPT
GEARED TOWARDS SCIENTISTS
WORKING TO PRESERVE
THE WORLD'S ECOSYSTEMS,
IN 1995 THE NEW IDEA
OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
WAS ADDED AS A KEY FUNCTION
OF BIOSPHERE RESERVES.
BIOSPHERE RESERVE MANAGERS
WERE NOW ENCOURAGED
TO HELP PEOPLE THRIVE
AS PART OF THEIR RESERVE'S
HEALTHY ECOSYSTEM.
TO THE NEW HEAD
OF THE GAULT ESTATE,
PROFESSOR MARTIN LECHOWICZ,
THE REVISED
BIOSPHERE RESERVE CONCEPT
OFFERED HOPE FOR THE FUTURE
OF THE MOUNTAIN.

Martin says THE OVER-ARCHING OPPORTUNITY
LAY IN THE BIOSPHERE RESERVES,
THAT WAS CLEAR,
BUT IT WAS EQUALLY CLEAR
THAT UNTIL WE STABILIZED
THE LOCAL SITUATION,
IT WOULDN'T BE ABLE
TO REALLY BUILD FORWARD.

The Narrator says DURING THIS PERIOD
OF TURMOIL AT THE GAULT ESTATE,
THERE WAS SOMETHING REMARKABLE
HAPPENING ON
THE MOUNTAIN'S CLIFFS,
THAT WOULD FUNDAMENTALLY CHANGE
THE WAY PEOPLE
PRACTICE CONSERVATION
IN MONT SAINT-HILAIRE.
ANNEMARIE ROTH HAD JUST STARTED
HELPING INJURED BIRDS,
WHEN, ON A HUNCH,
SHE VISITED THE CLIFFS
NEAR THE FOYER SAVOY,
A HOSPITAL FOR THOSE
WITH EPILEPSY,
WHERE SHE SPOTTED
TWO RARE PEREGRINE FALCONS.

Annemarie says SO, I SAW A PAIR COPULATING.
I COULDN'T BELIEVE MY EYES.
I WAS SO JUBILANT
AND I WAS SO HAPPY!
THEN I KNEW,
WHEN THEY'RE COPULATING
THERE IS A NEST HERE.
THE FEMALE,
I NAMED HER ALICE
AFTER ALICE JOHANNSEN.

A falcon grabs another bird as it flies.

The Narrator says THE PEREGRINE
FALCON HAD BECOME AN ICON
IN THE ENVIRONMENTAL MOVEMENT.
POPULATIONS OF
THE WORLD'S FASTEST BIRD
WERE DEVASTATED
BY THE EFFECTS OF DDT,
WHICH THINNED
THEIR EGGSHELLS.
THE RAPTOR WAS JUST
BEGINNING TO RECOVER
DUE TO A NORTH
AMERICAN DDT BAN,
AND A WIDELY PUBLICIZED
REHABILITATION EFFORT,
WHEN ANNEMARIE DISCOVERED
THE PEREGRINE NEST, OR EYRIE,
AT MONT SAINT-HILAIRE -
ONE OF ONLY A HANDFUL
OF KNOWN NESTING SITES
FOR THE ENDANGERED BIRD
IN QUEBEC.
BUT BEING SO CLOSE
TO MONTREAL
MEANT THAT THIS SITE
WAS ALSO POPULAR
WITH MOUNTAIN CLIMBERS.

Annemarie says THEY WERE TERRIBLY
DISTURBED BY THE CLIMBERS,
LEAVING THE NEST SITE
CONSTANTLY.
AND WHEN THE YOUNG WERE THERE,
NOT FEEDING THEM.
THE YOUNG WERE EXPOSED TO
THE HOT SUN OR RAIN
BECAUSE THE PEREGRINES
WERE TOO BUSY
TRYING TO DRIVE OFF
THE INTRUDERS.

The Narrator says CONCERNED BY WHAT SHE SAW,
ANNMARIE SAT AT
THE BASE OF THE CLIFF
WHILE THE PEREGRINES
WERE NESTING
AND TRIED TO CONVINCE PEOPLE,
LIKE MARC-ANDRÉ GUERTIN,
NOT TO DISTURB THE BIRDS.

Marc says I WAS A YOUNG TEENAGER
AT THE TIME
AND I WAS PLAYING
WITH MY FRIENDS
IN THE PEREGRINE FALCON EYRIE
AND SHE JUST INVITED US OVER
AND SAID DO YOU KNOW
WHAT'S HERE?
AND, YOU KNOW,
WE RARELY WANT TO HEAR
THAT WE'RE DOING SOMETHING
THAT COULD HAVE
AN IMPACT ON NATURE.
AND SHE REALLY CHANGED
THE COURSE OF MY LIFE
JUST BECAUSE
SHE BROUGHT ME OVER
AND EXPLAINED
THE WHOLE SITUATION TO ME.
AND I DID THE SAME
AFTERWARDS -
MANY, MANY
THOUSANDS OF TIMES.

Annemarie and March watch falcons.

Annemarie says THAT'S THE RAVEN-

Marc says YEAH.
OH OH, IT'S CHASING
THE PEREGRINE.

Annemarie says IT'S CHASING
THE PEREGRINE, YES IT IS.

Pictures show people climbing and a younger Mac holding a bird.

Marc says AND SHE LITERALLY CHANGED
THE TRAJECTORY OF MY CAREER
BECAUSE I WAS
GOING TO STUDY LAW
AND I ENDED UP STUDYING
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES.

The Narrator says ANNEMARIE APPROACHED MCGILL,
THE NATURE CENTRE,
AND ALL LEVELS OF GOVERNMENT
TO LET THEM KNOW
WHAT WAS GOING ON
WITH THE PEREGRINE FALCON
AT THE FOYER SAVOY.
MCGILL AND THE NATURE CENTRE
SENT UNIFORMED PATROLLERS
TO HELP PROTECT THE FALCON
DURING THE BREEDING SEASON.
THEY INSTALLED SIGNS,
BANNED CLIMBING,
AND REMOVED CLIMBING BOLTS
FROM THE CLIFF
TO STOP CLIMBERS
FROM DISTURBING THE SITE.
MARC-ANDRÉ WOULD
GO ON TO BECOME
THE NATURE CENTRE'S
CONSERVATION COORDINATOR.

Marc says WELL IT STARTED
WITH EDUCATION, RIGHT,
AND THAT WORKED FOR
A LITTLE WHILE
BUT RAPIDLY
IT BECAME CLEAR
THAT THERE WERE MORE
THAN JUST EDUCATION ISSUES.
BECAUSE OVER FROM THE LATE
SEVENTIES TO THE EIGHTIES
MONT SAINT-HILAIRE
REALLY BOOMED AS A SUBURBAN AREA
AND WE NEEDED
TO HAVE A BUFFER AREA
AROUND THE PEREGRINE
FALCON EYRIE
IF WE WANTED
THE PEREGRINES TO REMAIN.

The Narrator says THE ENVIRONMENTALISTS
AT MONT SAINT-HILAIRE
WOULD GET THEIR BUFFER AREA,
BUT IT WASN'T JUST BECAUSE
OF THE ENDANGERED FALCON.
IN THE MIDST OF THE FALCON'S
FRAGILE RECOVERY, THE
HOSPITAL CLOSED AND WAS
PURCHASED BY A DEVELOPER
WITH PLANS TO BUILD A 360-UNIT
CONDOMINIUM COMPLEX
RIGHT AGAINST THE CLIFF.
TO MONT SAINT-HILAIRE RESIDENT,
JACQUES MESSIER,
THIS WAS GOING TOO FAR.
THE GROUNDS
OF THE FOYER SAVOY HOSPITAL
HAD ALWAYS BEEN
LIKE A PUBLIC PARK
TO THOSE WHO LIVED
AROUND THE MOUNTAIN.

Jacque Messier speaks French. He stands by a rock with a plate. He is in his sixties, clean-shaven with short white hair. He wears a white shirt and gray trousers.

Subtitles read "For years we used the natural site here. I have memories of being here, at the top with Marie-Eve and Jean Philippe, with my young children. When we learned about what type of project was coming, people were completely surprised. We knew that medium density housing had just been established close to city hall. But people never thought that it would go so high up in the mountain. And so we founded, the association of citizens of Mont Saint-Hilaire."

The Narrator says THE CITIZENS ASSOCIATION
CREATED PETITIONS
AND LOBBIED CITY COUNCIL.
BUT IT WAS ONLY AFTER
THE LOCAL NEWSPAPER
STARTED FOLLOWING THE STORY
THAT JACQUES MET MARC-ANDRÉ,
WHO WAS TRYING TO PROTECT
THE FOYER SAVOY'S
RARE PEREGRINE FALCONS.

Jacque says HE CAME TO MEET US
AT THE HOUSE. HE RANG OUR
DOORBELL AND SAID ‘ARE YOU
THE GENTLEMAN FROM THE
NEWSPAPER?’
I SAID YES.
I MUST CONFESS, I WASN’T
PERSONALLY AWARE
THAT THERE WAS A PEREGRINE
FALCON NESTING SITE ON THE
CLIFSS OF THE MOUNTAIN
HERE. AND THEN MARC-ANDRÉ
TAUGHT ME ABOUT
THIS WHOLE OTHER DIMENSION.

(piano music plays)

The Narrator says IT TOOK EIGHT YEARS OF EFFORT
BY THE CITIZENS ASSOCIATION,
BUT FINALLY THE CITY
OF MONT SAINT-HILAIRE
AGREED TO BUY THE FOYER SAVOY
BACK FROM THE DEVELOPER,
FOR USE AS A PUBLIC PARK
AND A SANCTUARY
FOR THE PEREGRINE FALCON.
IT WAS THEN
THAT THE NATURE CENTRE
PARTNERED WITH THE CITY
TO NATURALIZE THE SITE.
WITH THE HELP OF VOLUNTEERS,
THE NATURE CENTRE REMOVED
THE RUINS OF THE OLD HOSPITAL,
AND PLANTED
MORE THAN 7000 TREES.

Kees says IT HAS BECOME SO NATURAL
YOU CAN'T EVEN IMAGINE
IT WAS SOMETHING ELSE.
THE ONLY THING THAT'S LEFT
IS AN OLD STAIRCASE.
WE LEFT IT THERE BECAUSE IT
HELPS YOU CLIMB A LITTLE EASIER
TO THE TOP OF THE FOYER SAVOY.

Marc says THE PEREGRINE FALCON ISSUE
BECAME A COMMUNITY ISSUE
OF HOW DO WE WANT
TO RELATE TO THE MOUNTAIN,
HOW DO WE WANT
TO RELATE TO NATURE
AND HOW MUCH NATURE
DO WE WANT IN OUR CITY.
AND BASICALLY IT SHIFTED
SO NOT JUST THINKING
OF LAND USE
PLANNING AROUND THIS
PEREGRINE FALCON EYRIE
BUT AROUND THE WHOLE MOUNTAIN.
AND REALLY THAT'S
WHEN THE NATURE CENTER
STARTED, YOU KNOW,
REACHING OUT TO PEOPLE
AND REACHING OUT TO THE CITY
AND PLAYING A MUCH MORE
ACTIVE ROLE.
WE WERE RETHINKING
THE WAY THE MOUNTAIN
WOULD DO ITS BUSINESS
AND THE WAY AND THE CITY
AND THE CITIZENS
WOULD GO ABOUT
THEIR BUSINESS
IN THEIR EVERYDAY LIFE.

Pictures of volunteers working in the area flash by.

The Narrator says WHETHER THEY KNEW IT OR NOT,
MONT SAINT-HILAIRE
WAS BEGINNING TO ACT
LIKE A BIOSPHERE RESERVE
FOCUSED ON SUSTAINABLE
DEVELOPMENT.
AND THE MAN TASKED
WITH MANAGING
THE BIOSPHERE RESERVE
DESIGNATION
AT THE NATURE CENTRE,
ERIC MALKA,
WAS CAREFULLY WATCHING
THE EVENTS UNFOLD.

The caption changes to "Éric Malka. Director, Mont Saint-Hilaire Nature Centre." Éric stands by a river. He is in his late thirties, clean-shaven with short hair. He wears a blue zip sweater.

Éric says THE BIOSPHERE RESERVE CONCEPT -
WE DIDN'T LEARN IT
THROUGH THE MAB STRATEGY
AND ALL
THE DIFFERENT DOCUMENTS
AT THE TIME WERE...
IN PLACE IN UNESCO
FOR BIOSPHERE RESERVE,
THAT THERE WAS THE NEW TYPE
OF BIOSPHERE RESERVE.
WE LEARNED IT
WITH THAT EXPERIENCE.
IT WAS, I WOULD SAY,
AN EYE OPENER FOR US.

The Narrator says NATURE CENTRE STAFF
BEGAN COMING OFF THE MOUNTAIN
TO COLLABORATE
WITH THE COMMUNITY.
BUILDING ON THE SUCCESS
OF THE FOYER SAVOY,
THEY STARTED ENGAGING PEOPLE
WHO WANTED TO DONATE
OR SELL LAND
AROUND THE MOUNTAIN
TO CREATE A MORE SECURE
BUFFER ZONE FOR ITS PROTECTION.
THEY ALSO LEARNED
FROM THE FOYER SAVOY PROJECT
HOW TO WORK WITH
THE MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT
TO CREATE WIN-WIN SCENARIOS
FOR THE COMMUNITY
AND NATURE
AT MONT SAINT-HILAIRE.
WHEN A SAND PIT
NEAR THE FOYER SAVOY
WAS BECOMING A PROBLEMATIC
PARTY SPOT FOR TEENAGERS,
THE NATURE CENTRE
TURNED IT INTO A POND.
ONLY THE FROGS
PARTY THERE NOW.

[frogs and crickets]

The Narrator continues ON ANOTHER PART OF
THE MOUNTAIN'S BUFFER ZONE,
A DRAINAGE BASIN
HAD BEEN BUILT
TO HELP PROTECT THE NEW
SUBDIVISIONS FROM FLOODING.
BUT WHEN A DESIGN FLAW CAUSED
THE BASIN TO START COLLAPSING,
THE NATURE CENTRE FIXED IT
WITH THE HELP
OF FLOOD RESISTANT PLANTS,
USING A DESIGN
THAT WILL EVENTUALLY
BLEND SEAMLESSLY
INTO THE MOUNTAIN.
THE NATURE-CENTRE
ALSO APPLIED THESE PRINCIPLES
TO THE MOUNTAIN ITSELF.
AT LAC HERTEL,
WHEN AN AGING FLOOD CONTROL DAM
NEEDED TO BE REPLACED,
THE NATURE CENTRE
TOOK THE OPPORTUNITY
TO COMPLETELY RE-NATURALIZE
THE STREAM BED,
RESULTING IN THE RETURN
OF FISH TO THE STREAM.

Éric says WE KNEW THINGS
COULD BE DONE DIFFERENTLY
BUT THE ONLY WAY
AT THE TIME TO DO IT
WAS TO SHOW OTHERS
IT CAN BE DONE
BECAUSE PEOPLE ALWAYS
REPEAT THE SAME RECIPE
AND SO WE HAVE
MANY TYPE OF PROJECTS
WHICH WE WERE ABLE TO FIND,
I WOULD SAY COMMON GROUND.
SOMETHING THAT SERVES
BOTH CONSERVATION
AND ALSO THE NEED
OF THE LOCAL COMMUNITY.

The Narrator says THE NATURE CENTRE'S PARTNERSHIP
WITH THE CITY
OF MONT SAINT-HILAIRE
WAS MAKING IT EASIER
FOR THE REGION
TO BALANCE NATURE
WITH INCREASING
SUBURBAN DEVELOPMENT.
THERE WAS HOWEVER,
ANOTHER OBVIOUS PARTNER
THAT WAS RIPE FOR THE PICKING.

Kees says THE ORCHARDS ARE SORT OF
A GREEN ECONOMY IN A WAY
AND IT IS A VERY IMPORTANT
PROTECTION
BECAUSE WHEN
THERE IS AN ORCHARD
THERE IS NO HOUSING DEVELOPMENT.
SO, WE WANTED
TO MAKE SURE
THE ORCHARDS
WERE GOING TO STAY.

An aerial view shows vast orchards.

The Narrator says THE NATURE CENTRE
BEGAN SELLING APPLE PRODUCTS
WITH 100 PERCENT OF THE PROCEEDS
GOING TO THE GROWERS.
MCGILL UNIVERSITY'S
MONTREAL CAMPUS
AGREED TO START BUYING APPLES
FROM MONT SAINT-HILAIRE
ORCHARDS.
AND THE NATURE CENTRE
STARTED INVITING FARMERS,
LIKE MICHEL ROBERTS,
TO JOIN ITS BOARD OF DIRECTORS.

Michel Roberts speaks French. He is in his early sixties and clean-shaven. He wears a gray hat and striped green and black polo-shirt.

Subtitles read "My involvement with the Nature Centre at Mont Saint-Hilaire is to try and protect my environment. The symbiosis between myself and I think all the artisanal producers and the mountain is clear because we need the pollinators. We need the birds to eat the insects in the orchard. It is important to have this bit of untouched nature in order to make our home here."

A woman drives a tractor in a field.

The Narrator says MICHEL'S FAMILY
HAS MADE THEIR HOME
AT MONT SAINT-HILAIRE
FOR FIVE GENERATIONS,
AND THEY'VE RUN THE PAVILLION
DE LA POMME ORCHARD
SINCE THE 1930S.
IN RECENT YEARS,
LOWER PRICES FOR APPLES
HAVE PROMPTED MICHEL
TO GREATLY DIVERSIFY HIS FARM,
WHICH NOW GROWS
A VARIETY OF BERRIES,
AS WELL AS TAPPING TREES
FOR MAPLE PRODUCTS.
MICHEL BELIEVES THAT
THIS DIVERSITY IS ALSO A WAY
OF GIVING BACK
TO THE MOUNTAIN.

Michel says BECAUSE WE
HAVE SMALL FARMS AND
WE ARE FAIRLY DIVERSE
ALL OF THE FARMS IN THE REGION
CONTRIBUTE TO THE
MOUNTAIN’S BIRD BIODIVERSITY.

The Narrator says MICHEL HAS BUILT
A THRIVING BUSINESS
TRANSFORMING
HIS DIVERSE HARVEST
INTO A VARIETY OF PRODUCTS,
INCLUDING A VERY POPULAR
HARD CIDER.
THIS HAS NOT ONLY HELPED
THE PAVILION DE LA POMME
SURVIVE FINANCIALLY,
IT'S ALSO REDUCED
THEIR RELIANCE ON PESTICIDES.

A male customer buys products at Michel’s shop.

Michel says WHAT THE
TRANSFORMATION DOES
IS ALLOW US TO USE THE
APPLES THAT ARE IN
FACT VERY GOOD, BUT THAT
DO NOT LOOK AS GOOD.
WE CAN AFFORD THE LUXURY
OF USING LESS PESTICIDES
OR LESS VIOLENT PESTICIDES
WHICH HAVE LESS OF AN
IMPACT ON NATURE.

Michel checks the branches of a tree.

The Narrator says IN THE ORCHARDS,
THE NATURE CENTRE
FOUND A PARTNER
WHO HAD NATURALLY BEEN
PROTECTING THE MOUNTAIN
FOR HUNDREDS OF YEARS.
BUT AS THE SUBURBAN POPULATION
IN MONT SAINT-HILAIRE
HAD RECENTLY DOUBLED,
THEY ALSO HAD TO
FIGURE OUT WAYS
TO THE MOUNTAIN.

The caption changes to "Genevière Poirier-Ghys. Conservation Coordinator, Mont Saint-Hilaire Nature Centre." Genevière is in her early forties with her hair tied-up. She wears a purple shirt.

Genevière I REMEMBER ONE TIME
WHEN STUDENTS FROM
THE LOCAL HIGH SCHOOL
CAME AND DID
VOLUNTEER ACTIVITY.
THEY DID, MOVE ROCKS AROUND,
PLANTED TREES
AND THEY DID A LOT OF WORK
AND IT CHANGED THE ENVIRONMENT
AND THEY WERE REALLY PROUD
OF WHAT THEY DID.
AND A FEW MONTHS LATER,
SOME PEOPLE CAME
AND DESTROYED IT.
AND THEY WERE
SO SAD ABOUT THIS.
AND THAT'S WHEN
WE REALIZED
HOW IMPORTANT
VOLUNTEER ACTIVITIES WERE
FOR FUTURE CONSERVATION
OF THE AREA.

Children throw leaves on the sides of a path.

The Narrator says THE NATURE CENTRE
AND NOW HAS
ABOUT 600 VOLUNTEERS,
INCLUDING
THE LEFRANCOIS FAMILY,
WHO MOVED TO THE AREA
ABOUT 10 YEARS AGO
AND ARE TODAY HELPING TO
STABILIZE A HEAVILY USED TRAIL.

The caption changes to "Simon LeFrançois. Volunteer, Mont Saint-Hilaire Nature Centre." Simon is in his late thirties, with a goatee and brown hair. He wears a white shirt with an abstract motif around the neck.

Simon says WE CHOOSE TO LIVE
IN MONT SAINT-HILAIRE
BECAUSE IT IS NATURE
IN A CITY LET'S SAY.
WE INTRODUCED
THE KIDS PRETTY EARLY,
EVEN BEFORE THEY WERE WALKING.
AND HERE WE ARE
DOING VOLUNTEER WORK.

The caption changes to "Léo LeFrançois. Volunteer, Mont Saint-Hilaire Nature Centre." Léo is ten years old with short black hair. He wears a gray hooded sweater.

Léo says WELL, VOLUNTEERING
IS REALLY FUN
BECAUSE WE GET TO STAY
AROUND THE MOUNTAIN
AND WE ALSO HAVE
TO TEACH PEOPLE
TO NOT TRASH THE PLACE,
LIKE DON'T LEAVE
YOUR GARBAGE AROUND
AND DON'T WALK OFF TRAILS
BECAUSE IT WILL DESTROY
THE NATURE AROUND
FOR PEOPLE
THAT WILL COME AFTER.
THE FINAL TOUCH.
IT LOOKS GOOD.

The Narrator says THE NATURE CENTRE
REVITALIZED ITSELF
BY LOOKING OUTWARD
INTO THE SURROUNDING COMMUNITY.
IN RETURN,
THE COMMUNITY EMBRACED
THE NATURE CENTRE'S PROGRAMS.
THE CENTRE IS NOW
FINANCIALLY STABLE,
WELCOMING SOME 200,000
PAYING VISITORS A YEAR
TO THE MOUNTAIN,
AND AFTER 15 YEARS,
THE CENTRE HAS SUCCEEDED
AROUND THE MOUNTAIN.

Green spots pop up in the animated map. A caption reads "New Protected Areas."

Éric says SO THERE IS NOT NOW MANY LAND
THAT IS NOT EITHER OWNED
BY A LAND DEVELOPER,
IT IS ALREADY DEVELOPED
OR BY CONSERVATION.
SO WE CAN REALLY SEE NOW
WHAT IS GOING TO BE
FOR THE NEXT HUNDRED YEARS.
NO MORE LAND
WILL EVER GO TO DEVELOPMENT
AND NO HOUSE WILL
EVER BE UN-BUILT
SO THAT WE CAN
PUT TREES IN IT.
IS IT GOOD, IS IT BAD?
IT IS JUST THE WAY IT IS.

The Narrator says THE TURN-AROUND
AT MONT SAINT-HILAIRE
HAS IMPACTED PEOPLE
AS MUCH AS ITS IMPACTED NATURE.
MARC-ANDRÉ GUERTIN
BECAME THE CEO
OF THE CANADIAN BIOSPHERE
RESERVES ASSOCIATION
AND SERVED ON THE CANADIAN
COMMISSION FOR UNESCO.
JACQUES MESSIER,
WHOSE CITIZENS ASSOCIATION
FOUGHT FOR EIGHT YEARS
TO PRESERVE THE FOYER SAVOY,
WENT ON TO WORK
FOR THE NATURE CENTRE
AS THE OPERATIONS MANAGER,
AND HIS SON JEAN-PHILIPPE,
WHO ALSO WORKED AT THE NATURE
CENTRE DURING THIS PERIOD,
WENT ON TO BE A KEY PLAYER
IN THE CREATION
OF ANOTHER BIOSPHERE RESERVE
IN NORTHERN QUEBEC,
MANICOUAGAN-UAPISHKA.

The caption changes to "Jean-Philipe Messier. Chair, Canadian Biosphere Reserves Association." Jean-Philipe is in his early thirties, clean-shaven with short brown hair. He wears a dark blue zip jacket.

Jean-Philipe says I THINK THAT PROBABLY THE FACT
THAT I HAVE WORKED
IN THE CENTRE DE LA NATURE
AT THE TIME THE IDEA
OF BIOSPHERE RESERVE
WAS COMING MORE AND MORE
IN THE HEAD OF THE PEOPLE THERE
CONTRIBUTED OF COURSE FOR ME
TO ACTUALLY UNDERSTAND
THE CONCEPT,
AND BEING ABLE TO REPLICATE IT
SOMEWHERE ELSE.
BUT RAPIDLY AS WELL
IT BECAME OBVIOUS
THAT THE REALITIES
ARE SO DIFFERENT
FROM SAINT-HILAIRE
TO MANICOUAGAN
THAT IT COULDN'T BE SUCH
AN EXAMPLE TO FOLLOW.
BUT DEFINITELY ONE
OF THE STRENGTH OF THE CONCEPT
OF BIOSPHERE RESERVE
IS FLEXIBILITY
AND IT IS DEFINITELY
SOMETHING THAT UNESCO
IS ENCOURAGING
FOR THE BIOSPHERE RESERVES
AS ORGANIZATIONS
TO ACTUALLY IMPLEMENT MISSIONS
THAT ARE RELEVANT
FOR THEIR OWN CONTEXT.
SO HOW TO MAKE MANICOUAGAN'S
COMMUNITY SUSTAINABLE,
HOW TO MAKE
UCLUELET COMMUNITY
IN CLAYOQUOT SOUND
SUSTAINABLE,
HOW TO MAKE THE HUTU COMMUNITY
IN RWANDA SUSTAINABLE,
YOU KNOW YOU HAVE
VERY DIFFERENT ANSWERS
SO YOU NEED TO FIND YOUR OWN WAY
AND YOUR OWN PATH
AND THIS IS ACTUALLY
WHAT THE BIOSPHERE RESERVE
IS ALL ABOUT.

(SPEAKING FRENCH)
Visitors take a guided tour through the reserve.

Fast clips show Jean-Philipe in meetings, a port and a large centre.

The Narrator says BACK IN MONT SAINT-HILAIRE,
THE BIOSPHERE RESERVE
CONTINUES TO EVOLVE.
THE NATURE CENTRE
HAS RECENTLY STARTED WORKING
WITH COMMUNITIES
AT THE FAR END OF THE RESERVE,
AND HAS COLLABORATED
WITH THE MATHIEU FAMILY
TO CONSERVE
A 272-HECTARE WETLAND
THAT'S A KEY PART
OF A FOREST CORRIDOR
THAT LEADS TO THE MOUNTAIN.

Éric says THE NATURE CENTER
HAS BEEN KNOWN
FOR DOING PROTECTION OF
MONT SAINT-HILAIRE OF COURSE.
AND WITH THIS PROJECT
IF THERE WAS A SIDE GOAL
OTHER THAN
PROTECTING THIS WETLAND
WOULD BE FOR PEOPLE TO SEE THAT
WE ARE NOT ONLY PROTECTING
THE MOUNTAIN ITSELF
BUT IT'S IMPORTANT
TO PROTECT PIECES OF NATURE
THAT ARE FAR BECAUSE
IT IS ALL CONNECTED.
AND I THINK THAT WILL
REALLY CHANGE THE WAY
PEOPLE FEEL
ABOUT CONSERVATION.
THAT IT'S NOT -
WE JUST NEED TO PROTECT
MONT SAINT-HILAIRE -
BUT IT HAS TO BE
DONE IN THIS TOWN,
AND IF IT HAS TO BE
DONE IN THIS TOWN,
MAYBE A BIT IN THE OTHER TOWN.
AND HOPEFULLY THIS WILL
BE A TURNING POINT
IN OUR BIOSPHERE RESERVE.

The Narrator says SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH
AT THE MONT SAINT-HILAIRE
BIOSPHERE RESERVE
IS ALSO EVOLVING,
SHIFTING OUTWARD
INTO THE COMMUNITY
THROUGH MCGILL'S
MONTÉRÉGIE CONNECTION PROJECT.
THE GOAL OF THIS PROJECT
IS TO UNDERSTAND THE LINK
BETWEEN BIODIVERSITY
AND THE ECOSYSTEM SERVICES
PROVIDED TO PEOPLE
LIKE MICHEL ROBERT.
RESEARCHER, KYLE MARTINS,
HAS BEEN STUDYING THE FARMS
OF MONT SAINT-HILAIRE
TO LEARN HOW WILD BEE DIVERSITY
IMPACTS POLLINATION.

Kyle Martins moves a fishing net in the grass.

The caption changes to "Kyle Martins. Researcher, Department of Biology McGill University." Kyñe is in his early thirties, with a goatee and wavy dark brown hair. He wears a lilac polo-shirt.

Kyle says AND WE HAD SOME
PRETTY SURPRISING RESULTS,
FOR INSTANCE,
IN APPLE ORCHARDS BEE DIVERSITY
WAS REALLY IMPORTANT
TO ESTABLISH FULLER,
AND ROUNDER APPLES.

The Narrator says INCREASED BEE DIVERSITY
LEADS TO HEALTHIER APPLES
BECAUSE OF THE WAY
WILD BEES POLLINATE,
AS COMPARED TO
THE HONEY BEES
THAT FARMERS USUALLY BRING IN
TO POLLINATE THEIR ORCHARDS.

Kyle holds a jar containing a bee and says WE FOUND THAT THINGS
LIKE THIS ANDRENA,
HERE IN THE JAR,
THE ENGLISH NAME FOR
WHICH IS THE MINING BEE,
WERE VERY EFFECTIVE AT
DEPOSITING LOTS OF POLLEN
ON THE APPLE STIGMAS.
COMPARED TO HONEY BEES,
BUMBLE BEES WHICH,
ARE FOR THE MOST PART WILD
AND COME FROM THE LANDSCAPES
SURROUNDING ORCHARDS,
THEY WOULD VISIT UP TO
THREE TIMES
AS MANY APPLE FLOWERS
PER MINUTE,
SO YOU CAN CONSIDER
THEM THE FAST BEES
THAT CAN JUST SPEED
THROUGH YOUR ORCHARD.

A bee pollinates white flowers.

The Narrator says TO TELL FARMERS
HOW TO INCREASE THE NUMBER
OF EAGER WILD BEES
ON THEIR LAND,
KYLE STUDIED THE EFFECT
OF NEARBY NATURAL AREAS
ON BEE DIVERSITY.

Kyle says AND WHAT WE FOUND
WAS THAT THE MORE MEADOWS
AND FORESTS WITHIN PROXIMITY
OF THE ORCHARDS,
THE GREATER BEE DIVERSITY
YOU'LL HAVE AT A GIVEN ORCHARD.
AND THIS IS USEFUL
BECAUSE WE CAN SAY
THAT ABOUT
THREE HECTARES OF MEADOWS
WILL IMPROVE
BEE DIVERSITY
ACROSS ORCHARDS
IN THE REGION
SO IT PROVIDES VERY CONCRETE
MANAGEMENT PRACTICES
FOR ORCHARDISTS
OF SOUTHERN QUEBEC.

The Narrator says PERHAPS KYLE'S
MOST SURPRISING FINDING
HAS TO DO WITH THE IMPACT
OF RESIDENTIAL SUBURBS
ON BEE DIVERSITY.

Kyle says IT WAS SURPRISING FOR US
TO FIND THAT BEE DIVERSITY
WAS ESPECIALLY HIGHER
IN URBAN AREAS
OR AT LEAST IN THE SUBURBS
OF MONT SAINT-HILAIRE.
AS YOU WOULD EXPECT,
IF YOU HAVE LOTS OF DRIVEWAYS
AND STREETS
THAT PASS THROUGH AN AREA
THESE ARE AREAS THAT BEES
CAN'T REALLY USE
BECAUSE THERE AREN'T
FLOWERS TO BE FOUND.
BUT AT LEAST HERE
ON MONT SAINT-HILAIRE
AND IN THE CONTEXT
OF THE BIOSPHERE RESERVE
WE FOUND THAT PEOPLE
ARE ACTUALLY VERY SENSITIVE
TO THE NEEDS OF POLLINATORS
AND THEY WOULD PLANT FLOWERS
THAT WERE IN BLOOM
ACROSS THE ENTIRE LENGTH
OF THE BEE LIFE CYCLE.

The Narrator says SO AS FAR AS
THE POLLINATORS ARE CONCERNED,
THE NEW SUBDIVISIONS
ARE ACTUALLY HELPING
THE ORCHARDS GROW BETTER FRUIT.
FOR HIS PART,
MICHEL IS HAPPY TO HAVE KYLE
WORKING IN HIS ORCHARD.
HE'S EVEN STARTED TO PROTECT
NOW THAT HE KNOWS
HOW EFFECTIVE THEY ARE.

Michel crouches on the grass.

Michel says I NEVER THOUGHT THAT
THEY WERE POLLINATORS.
WE HAD ALREADY SEEN THOSE
SORTS OF LITTLE HOLES.
BUT IT HAS ONLY BEEN A
FEW YEARS SINCE
I LEARNED THAT THOSE
WERE VERY USEFUL
LITTLE INSECTS FOR US.

The Narrator says THE RESEARCH
THAT KYLE AND HIS COLLEAGUES
ARE CONDUCTING
WILL HELP PEOPLE
MAKE BETTER CHOICES
FOR THE FUTURE.
BUT AS THE MOUNTAIN'S
CONSERVATIONISTS
ARE BEGINNING TO UNDERSTAND,
SCIENCE ONLY GETS YOU SO FAR
IN THE QUEST
FOR A SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY.

Kees says SCIENCE IS NOT ENOUGH.
SCIENCE IS IMPORTANT,
TO KNOW REALLY,
THE SERVICES OFFERED BY NATURE,
IT'S VERY IMPORTANT.
BUT, THAT IS GOOD
FOR THE INTELLIGENCE.
BUT, IT DOESN'T NECESSARILY
TOUCH THE HEART.
YOU HAVE TO TOUCH THE HEART
SO YOU HAVE TO FIND,
ACTIVITIES,
THAT ARE CLOSER TO CULTURE.

The Narrator says EVERY YEAR, THOUSANDS FLOCK
TO THE PAVILLION DE LA POMME
FOR CREATIONS-SUR-LE CHAMP,
LAND ART MONT SAINT-HILAIRE,
TO CREATE WORKS
USING NATURAL ELEMENTS
FOUND IN THE ORCHARD.
IT IS AN EVENT
IMAGINED BY LOCAL ARTIST
JEREMIE BOUDREAULT.

Jeremie Boudreault stands in the woods. Apples pile up inside thin and tall structures.

She is in her forties with blond hair. She wears a patterned hat and a blue winter coat. She speaks French.

Subtitles read "It’s an event which makes people smile. The fall colours, the mountain, people take the time to feel things."

The Narrator says THE ARTISTS
COME FROM ACROSS CANADA,
AND THIS YEAR MARC WALTER
HAS IMAGINED A WORLD
WITHOUT BEES,
WHERE FLIES HAVE BEEN
GENETICALLY ENGINEERED
TO POLLINATE CROPS.
DANIEL GAUTIER'S WORK,
"THE TREES ALSO DREAM,"
IS A REFLECTION
ON CLIMATE CHANGE.

A boat made up of branches and containing apples surrounds a tree.

Daniel Gautier is in his late fifties, with white hair and clean-shaven. He wears glasses and a black and white striped sweater.

He speaks French. Subtitles read "We thing that humans are the only one who can dream. But I think that animals and plants dream. So this tree’s dream is to build a very powerful boat to take its fruits to the end of the world."

[LAUGHTER]

The Narrator says NOT ALL OF THE WORK
IS QUITE SO SERIOUS.
MARC CHICOINE HAS CREATED
AN INTERACTIVE INSTALLATION
WHERE PEOPLE CAN BUILD
BOATS OUT OF APPLIES.

[LAUGHTER]
Marc Chicoine stands by a table sitting in the woods. He is in his forties and clean-shaven. He wears a blue woollen hat, black scarf and blue windproof jacket.

Marc speaks French. Subtitles read "We told ourselves: ‘our installation, we want it to be a game’ We invite the public to build these small boats with us."

Kathleen sticks apples in a stick.

The caption changes to "Kathleen Renaud. Patron, Créations-sur-le-champ, Land art Mont Saint-Hilaire." Kathleen is in her thirties with long brown hair. She wears a green woollen hat and a black coat.

Kathleen says WE COME FROM THE REGION
AND WE TRY TO COME EVERY YEAR.
AND WE LIKE IT,
WE LIKE ART.
AND WE LIKE THIS
DIFFERENT WAY OF
MAKING ART WITH NATURE.
AND IT’S ALSO
THE FUN, IT
ALLOWS US TO THINK.

Kathleen releases a long apple boat on a body of water.

Marc says THERE ARE SIMPLE BOATS,
THERE ARE COMPLICATED BOATS.
BOATS THAT FLOAT AND
OTHERS THAT DON’T FLOAT.

Marc laughs.

The caption changes to "Zoé Bellehumeur. Patron, Créations-sur-le-champ, Land art Mont Saint-Hilaire." Zoé is in her twenties with her hair tied-up. She wears glasses, black gloves, a large purple scarf and a yellow coat.

Zoé says IT REALLY COMBINES THINGS
THAT OUR FAMILY LOVES:
AND TO SEE THAT THE
ARTISTS ARE CAPABLE
OF EXPRESSING THEMSELVES
IN THESE TWO COMPONENTS,
IT’S COMPLETELY MARVELOUS!

Zoé, a woman and a child walk into a cave made of dirt.

Daniel says FINALLY WE HAVE COME, HUMANITY,
TO A CRITICAL POINT!
AND I THINK THAT WE NEED
IMAGINATION TO CHANGE THESE
THINGS.
AND I THINK THAT ART
IS A PART OF THAT.

Jeremie says I THINK THAT USING ART,
TO ME IS MORE SUBLE,
IT’S MORE SENSITIVE.
IT’S MY WAY OF SAYING
TO PROTECT NATURE.
THERE’S LIKE
A HOPE IN ALL OF THIS.

The Narrator says THE LAND ART EVENT
IS ONE OF MICHEL'S
FAVOURITE TIMES OF YEAR.
IT DRIVES THOUSANDS
OF POTENTIAL CUSTOMERS
TO THE ORCHARD,
AND HE IS ALSO
A BIG FAN OF THE ART,
OFTEN LEAVING PIECES IN PLACE
FOR YEARS AFTER THEIR CREATION.

A person walks by colourful branches in the woods.

Michel says EVERY REGION FINDS ITS
OWN WAY OF GETTING BY
IN SPITE OF THE DIFFERENT
PROBLEMS.
FOR US, AROUND MONT
SAINT-HILAIRE
I THINK THAT WE ARE GOING
TO CONTINUE TO HAVE ORCHARDS
IN SPITE OF URBAN PRESSURE
BECAUSE THERE IS ALSO A PRESSURE
TO PRESERVE AGRICULTURAL
SPACES.
AND THEN, IN OUR SPACE,
WE ARE PRETTY STUBBORN.

He laughs.

The Narrator says THE LAST 50 YEARS
HAVE SEEN A HUGE INCREASE
IN SUBURBAN DEVELOPMENT
AROUND MONT SAINT-HILAIRE.
BUT BECAUSE OF A LONG LINE
OF PEOPLE DEDICATED
TO THE PROTECTION
OF THEIR HOME AND MOUNTAIN,
IT IS STILL A GREAT PLACE
FOR WILDLIFE.
TODAY, ANNEMARIE
IS HELPING GUY FITZGÉRALD
FROM QUEBEC'S BIRDS OF PREY
REHABILITATION UNION,
RELEASE A MENDED
PEREGRINE FALCON.
THIS FALCON WAS FOUND
TANGLED IN A SOCCER NET
IN EASTERN QUEBEC.
BUT THE PLACE THEY'VE
CHOSEN FOR ITS RELEASE
IS THE FOYER SAVOY URBAN PARK,
WHERE ANNEMARIE FIRST NOTICED
THE ENDANGERED FALCONS NESTING
BACK IN 1987.

Annemarie and Guy Fitzgérald get out of a car. Guy opens a box and holds a falcon.

The caption changes to "Guy Fitzgérald. President, Québec Birds and Pray Rehabilitation Union." Guy is in his mid-forties, clean-shaven with receding brown hair. He wears glasses, blue jeans and an orange spot jacket.

Guy says IT'S CLEAR THAT WE ARE
OVERLAPPING
THE URBAN HABITAT,
HUMAN HABITAT
WITH THE NATURAL HABITAT,
AND THE WILDLIFE
ADAPTS TO THAT,
SO THE PEREGRINE FALCON
COULD ADAPT
AND SURVIVE ON THE CLIFF
WITH SOME HELP
BECAUSE THERE WAS
SOME CONSERVATION EFFORT
TO PROTECT THEIR HABITAT.
SO IT'S A GOOD PLACE
FOR RELEASE
OF PEREGRINE FALCON.

The Narrator says FOR ANNEMARIE,
THERE'S AN UPSIDE
TO MORE PEOPLE LIVING NEAR
MONT SAINT-HILAIRE -
THAT THEY WILL HAVE
THE OPPORTUNITY TO KNOW NATURE
LIKE SHE HAS
OVER THE YEARS.

Annemarie says THAT'S THE GOOD PART.
THAT SO MANY MORE PEOPLE
ARE WAKING UP TO NATURE,
THAT THEY ARE INTERESTED,
THAT THEY REALLY WANT
TO BE OUT THERE.
THAT THIS PIECE OF WILDERNESS
IS THERE TO BE PROTECTED
AND TO BE KEPT FOREVER,
AND HOPEFULLY THEY ALSO
TAKE THAT HOME WITH THEM
AND APPLY THAT ELSEWHERE ALSO.

The caption changes to "Laïyane LeFrançois. Volunteer, Mont Saint-Hilaire Nature Centre." Laïyane is nine years old, and has brown hair. She wears a purple hooded sweater with printed white letters.

Laïyane says I THINK VOLUNTEERING
ON THE MOUNTAIN IS IMPORTANT
BECAUSE YOU ARE
HELPING THE NATURE
FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS.

Marc says YOU KNOW WE HAVE
COME A LONG WAY
AND IT IS REALLY
NICE TO SEE HOW
WE'RE BEHAVING MORE
LIKE A BIOSPHERE RESERVE,
BUT, YOU KNOW,
SUSTAINABILITY
IS NOT SOMETHING
YOU EVER ACHIEVE,
I MEAN IT'S A PROCESS.
AND I INVITE
PEOPLE TO THINK
ON HOW THEY DEPEND ON NATURE
AND HOW NATURE
IS INSPIRING TO THEM
AND HOW THEY CAN
THEN TAKE THAT OVER
AND CHANGE THE WAY
THEY DO THEIR BUSINESS.

Kees says DON'T CRY ABOUT ALL THE PROBLEMS
IN THE ENVIRONMENT.
NO, NO, NO
IT'S THE OPPOSITE.
SHOW THEM IT'S BEAUTIFUL.
IT'S REALLY WORTHWHILE
HAVING MORE OF IT.
BECAUSE, IT'S NOT ONLY
BEAUTIFUL TO LOOK AT,
IT'S GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH.
THE MOUNTAIN
IS GREATER THAN US.
THE FOREST HERE,
THEY WERE THERE BEFORE US,
THEY WILL BE THERE AFTER US.
AND WE WILL DO ALL WE CAN
TO KEEP IT HEALTHY.

Annemarie releases the falcon.

Annemarie says WOW!
EVERYBODY SHOULD
HAVE THIS FEELING
AND THIS ATTACHMENT TO NATURE.

[falcon cries]

(music plays)

The end credits roll.

For more on the biosphere reserves of Striking Balance www.striking balance.ca

Director and Editor, Zach Melnick.

Producer and Graphics, Yvonne Drebert.

Executive Producer TVO, Jane Jarkovic.

Copyright 2016, Striking Balance Inc.

Watch: Ep. 3 - Mont Saint-Hilaire