Video Transcript

A caption reads "TVO Original. TVO Presents. Produced with the participation of Telus Fund. With the Canada Media Fund. A Fathom Film Group Production. A film by Ann Shin."
(BIRD CHIRPING)

(INDISTINCT CHATTER)

Ann, the narrator, has a picnic at a park with her daughters and friends.

Ann is in her thirties, with long straight brown hair with highlights. She wears jeans and a floral blouse.

She says OKAY, WANT SOME STRAWBERRIES IN HERE?

One of the kids says STRAWBERRIES? THE BIG ONE.

Ann says YEAH, YOU WANT THIS ONE? OKAY. WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE? THIS IS FROM THE-

Ann says FOOD: SOME PEOPLE SAY LOVE GOES THE WORLD GO AROUND, BUT I THINK IT'S FOOD. FOOD IS WHAT KEEPS US GOING AND I LOVE EVERYTHING ABOUT IT.

Ann says COULD YOU PASS THE COCONUT WATER?

Ann says I'M ONE OF THOSE ANNOYING PEOPLE WHO JUMP ON THE LATEST FOOD TREND, WHATEVER SOME NUTRITIONIST OR BLOGGER IS PUSHING AS A NEW ELIXIR OF LIFE, AND IT'S HARD TO KEEP TRACK. EVERY WEEK THERE'S A NEW REPORT: DAIRY IS GOOD, THEN BAD, THEN GOOD AGAIN, SUGAR IS POISON, SALT WILL KILL YOU. THEN WE HAVE THE SUPERFOODS, FOODS THAT MANY CLAIM HAVE SPECIAL HEALTH BENEFITS THAT MAY HELP FIGHT DISEASES. OTHERS SAY IT'S JUST A MARKETING PLOY.

A clip shows the woman going in an organic foods store.

The woman says THE QUINOA?

Ann says I DON'T NEED TO LIVE FOREVER, BUT I'M IN NO HURRY TO CHECK OUT YET, SO I'LL TRY ANYTHING THAT'S SUPPOSED TO EXTEND MY STAY HERE, PLUS I WANT TO FEED MY KIDS HEALTHY FOOD. IN THE PAST FIVE YEARS, THE NUMBER OF FOODS DESCRIBED AS SUPERFOODS HAS MORE THAN DOUBLED ACROSS THE GLOBE. HOW DOES THIS SUPERFOOD TREND IMPACT FISHERS AND FARMERS AROUND THE WORLD?

A clip shows people working the soil with the caption "Bolivian quinoa."

Ann says I SET OUT TO MEET SOME FARMING FAMILIES WHO WORK THE SOIL, PEOPLE LIKE THE QUISPE POMA FAMILY, WHO, AMONG OTHER THINGS, GROW QUINOA, A GLUTEN FREE ALTERNATIVE TO STARCHY GRAIN.

Another clip shows a woman cutting a coconut with the caption "Phillipine coconuts."

Ann says IN THE PHILLIPINES SUSAN ALCOS, A SINGLE MOM, GROWS COCONUTS FOR A LIVING. SHE'S PART OF A LOCAL FAIR TRADE MOVEMENT BATTLING WITH A DEVELOPER. THE NEW KID ON THE SUPERFOOD BLOCK IS WILLIAMS' LOVEGRASS, BETTER KNOWN AS TEFF.

Another clip shows Ethiopian women making flat bread with the caption "Ethiopian teff."

Ann says FOR MANY ETHIOPIANS WHO INJERA BREAD WITH TEFF, IT'S AN ESSENTIAL INGREDIENT AT BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND DINNER.

Another clips shows a couple on a boat with the caption "Canadian Salmon."

Ann says AND CLOSER TO HOME, JASKWAAN AND JAALEN
TEACH THEIR KIDS THE HAIDA WAY OF FISHING SALMON AND HARVESTING SEAWEED. THE SUPERFOOD INDUSTRY RAKES IN MORE THAN A HUNDRED AND THIRTY BILLION DOLLARS A YEAR. I WANTED TO FIND OUT HOW IT AFFECTS THESE FARMING FAMILIES. WHERE ARE THEY IN THE SUPERFOOD CHAIN?

The name of the show appears against an image of a supermarket aisle. It reads "The super food chain."

Ann says THE SUPERFOOD I EAT THE MOST IS PROBABLY QUINOA. I KNOW, IT'S EVERYWHERE. SO HOW DOES A SUPERFOOD BECOME TRENDY? WELL IN SOME CASES IT'S ALL IN THE NAME. NOT LONG AGO, FEW PEOPLE HAD EVEN HEARD OF KIWI FRUIT, OR SHOULD I SAY THE CHINESE GOOSEBERRY? WHEN THIS FRUIT WAS IMPORTED TO NORTH AMERICA IT WAS CALLED THE CHINESE GOOSEBERRY OR MELONETTE. NOT TOO MANY TAKERS. THEN GROWERS IN NEW ZEALAND, THE KIWIS, HAD THE BRILLIANT IDEA OF REBRANDING IT AS, WHAT ELSE, KIWI FRUIT. NOW IT'S EXPORTED EVERYWHERE AND GLOBAL KIWI SALES TOP TWO POINT FIVE BILLION DOLLARS US. SO HOW DID QUINOA BECOME SO POPULAR? IT TOOK SOME YEARS FOR THIS PEASANT GRAIN TO BECOME AN OVERNIGHT SUCCESS. FOR STARTERS, YOU CAN THANK OPRAH. THE GRAND DAME OF DAYTIME TV WENT ON A DIET THAT INCLUDED QUINOA AND HER FAITHFUL FOLLOWERS FOLLOWED. IN 2010, THE COOKBOOK "QUINOA 365: THE EVERYDAY SUPERFOOD" BECAME A BESTSELLER, AND TO TOP IT ALL OFF, THE UNITED NATIONS NO LESS DECLARED 2013 TO BE THE YEAR OF QUINOA. AND THAT'S PRETTY MUCH HOW EVERYONE AND THEIR MOTHER IS EATING IT TODAY. QUINOA HAS TWICE AS MUCH PROTEIN AS RICE OR BARLEY, IT CONTAINS VITAMINS B AND E AND IS ALSO A GOOD SOURCE OF CALCIUM, MANGANESE AND MAGNESIUM. THE LIST GOES ON IN TERMS OF HEALTH BENEFITS, BUT LET'S START WITH A LOOK AT WHERE QUINOA COMES FROM.

An image of a farm appears with the caption "Bolivia."

Ann says THIS IS THE LAKE TITICACA REGION OF THE BOLIVIAN HIGHLANDS, WHERE QUINOA ORIGINATED THOUSANDS OF YEARS AGO. IT'S HOME TO THE QUISPE POMA FAMILY.

(SHEEP BLEATING)

(SCHOOL BELL RINGING)

Nilda is 12, with long slightly wavy brown hair in a ponytail. She wears purple trousers and a purple sweater.

She says MY NAME IS NILDA QUISPE POMA. I'M 12 YEARS OLD. MY SISTERS ARE CALLED LIZETH AND MAYDA. DAY TO DAY I GATHER THE SHEEP. I LIKE MY SCHOOL. I LIKE HANDICRAFTS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE. EVER SINCE I WAS LITTLE I LIKE TO EAT POTATOES, CHUNO AND TUNTA. ALL THAT FROM MY LAND.

A caption reads "Pablo. Farmer. Father. Justthia. Farmer. Mother."

Pablo is in his late fifties, with short brown hair and wears blue trousers, a white, blue and red cardigan sweater and a gray cap hat.

Justthia is in her fifties, with long wavy brown hair and wears a floral skirt, a white sweater and a denim hat.

Pablo says WE HARVEST, POTATO, OCA, BARLEY, OATS, WHEAT-

Justthia says QUINOA.

Pablo says QUINOA. THIS IS QUINOA LIKE, FOR EXAMPLE, WE SOW IT IN OCTOBER. IT TAKES ONE WEEK TO EMERGE. WE SOW AND IN ONE WEEK, IT EMERGES, TO A HEIGHT LIKE THIS FROM THE GROUND AND THEN KEEPS ON GROWING. IT TAKES 3 MONTHS, OCTOBER, NOVEMBER, DECEMBER AND IT'S READY, FULLY GROWN UP. THIS ONE FOR EXAMPLE IS NOT READY YET, IT NEEDS THE FROST.

A clip shows Jussthia milking a cow.

Justthia says WE COOK VERY EARLY IN THE MORNING, WE NEED TO RUSH TO THE FIELDS TO HARVEST POTATO. IT'S VERY HARD WORK HERE IN THE COUNTRYSIDE. MY PARENTS DID THE SAME. WE DO THE SAME. THAT'S WHY WE HAVE TO WORK, THERE IS NO OTHER THING.

Ann says THERE'S NOTHING NEW ABOUT QUINOA, IN FACT IT'S BEEN HARVESTED HERE FOR OVER THREE THOUSAND YEARS. IT WAS A STAPLE FOR THE INCAS.

Pablo says EVER SINCE THE TIME OF OUT GREAT-GRANDPARENTS [WE HAVE GROWN QUINOA]. NOW, PEOPLE ARE SOWING IT [BECAUSE IT HAS A GOOD PRICE].

The caption changes to "Ruffino. Pablo's neighbour."

Ruffino is in his fifties, with short brown hair and wears gray trousers, a white sweater, a gray jacket and a gray hat.

He says WE EAT THIS QUINOA OURSELVES. WHEN WE NEED TO MAKE INCOME WE SELL SOME AT THE MARKET.

The caption changes to "Roberto. Pablo's neighbour."

Roberto is in his fifties, with short brown hair and wears a white shirt, a black leather jacket and a brown hat.

He says WE REALIZED THAT QUINOA HAD BECOME WORLDWIDE FAMOUS, THAT'S WHEN THE DOCTORS ALSO CAME TO RECOMMEND QUINOA AS A GREAT FOOD. THUS THEY REALIZED ITS VALUE AND STARTED TO BUY MORE QUINOA. THEY TAKE IT TO MAKE BREAKFAST CEREALS, QUINOA PUFFS, THEY'RE TAKING IT ABROAD. THAT'S WHY QUINOA'S VALUE WENT UP.

A clip shows Pablo and his family harvesting quinoa.

Ann says LIKE MOST SMALL FARMERS AROUND THE WORLD, THE FIRST PRIORITY IS TO FEED THE FAMILY AND SECOND IS TO MAKE SOME INCOME FROM THEIR CROPS. WHAT MAKES QUINOA IS SO PROFITABLE IS THAT SIMPLE RULE OF ECONOMICS, SUPPLY AND DEMAND. EVERYONE WANTED IT AND RELATIVELY FEW FARMERS WERE PRODUCING IT, SO PRICES WENT THROUGH THE ROOF. GOOD FOR JUSTTHIA, WHO COULD START BUYING THINGS WITH HER NEW INCOME, BUT THEN CITY DWELLERS WHO WANTED TO CASH IN ON THE QUINOA BOOM STARTED CLAIMING LAND IN THE BOLIVIAN HIGHLANDS. THIS LED TO LAND DISPUTES BETWEEN FARMERS AND NEW LAND SQUATTERS FROM THE CITY. WHEN MULTINATIONALS IN OTHER COUNTRIES STARTED PLANTING IT, THEY FLOODED THE MARKET WITH MASS PRODUCED QUINOA, CAUSE PRICES TO PLUMMET, AND GUYS LIKE ROBERTO, THE ORIGINAL QUINOA FARMERS, GOT PUSHED OUT.

The caption changes to "Fabricio. Co-Founder Andean Naturals."

Fabricio is in his forites, bald and with a goatee and wears a blue plaid shirt and a brown-gray jacket with patches.

He says SO THIS IS WHERE YOU SEE GLOBALIZATION AT WORK. COUNTRIES THAT NEVER HEARD OF QUINOA ALL OF A SUDDEN ARE STARTING TO PLANT IT VERY AGGRESSIVELY. COUNTIRES LIKE SPAIN, CANADA, US. EVEN INDIA AND CHINA ARE EXPLORING PRODUCTION. IT'S A FACT THAT THEY CAN PRODUCE QUINOA AT A LOWER COST THAN BOLIVIANS CAN, AND THAT IS GOING TO BE DIFFICULT.

Pablo says IN THE PAST THERE WERE GOOD SEASONS, BUT THIS YEAR WE HAD BAD LUCK, THE QUINOA PRICE FELL. THEY'RE SOWING A LOT OF QUINOA IN PERU TOO. THEY'RE NOT BUYING FROM BOLIVIA ANYMORE. WE TAKE OUR QUINOA TO THE BATALLAS MARKET TO SELL.

He walks down a street market and asks a seller THIS IS THE QUINOA THAT YOU BUY [FROM FARMERS], RIGHT?

The seller says YES.

Pablo says SO HOW MUCH DO YOU PAY FOR 25 POUNDS?

The seller says [10 DOLLARS]

Pablo says THE PRICES HAVE FALLEN TOO LOW THIS SEASON, NO? DO YOU KNOW WHAT WAS THE PRICE OF THE QUINOA IN THE PAST?

The seller says I WOULD PAY 200 DOLLARS PER 100 POUNDS.

Pablo says 200 DOLLARS, NO?

The seller says SO IT WAS 50 DOLLARS PER 25 POUNDS.

Pablo says YES, SO WHAT MAKES THE QUINOA PRICE FALL?

The seller says THEY SAY THERE ARE NO EXPORT MARKETS, THAT'S WHY. THEY USED TO EXPORT WHAT THEY GOT FROM PERU TO ECUADOR. NOW IT'S NOT LIKE THAT ANYMORE.

Fabricio says BACK IN 2013 WE WERE LOOKING AT 8000 DOLLARSPER METRIC TONNE FOR EXPORT PRICES. THEY STARTED GOING DOWN TO 5000 DOLLARS ER METRIC TONNE, 3500 DOLLARS PER TONNE- THIS WAS LAST YEAR- AND RIGHT NOW WE ARE AT 2600 DOLLARS PER METRIC TONNE. SO IT'S JUST BEEN A DRAMATIC, DRAMATIC DROP OFF.

Pablo says LAST YEAR AND THE YEAR BEFORE, EVERYONE SOWED QUINOA, EVERYWHERE YOU SAW QUINOA. AT THAT TIME THE PRICE WAS HIGHER, EVERYONE WAS WORKING HARD TO PRODUCE QUINOA. NOW IT'S CHANGED. I'M THE ONLY ONE PRODUCING QUINOA.

Ann says QUINOA IS NOT A CASH CROP FOR ROBERTO ANYMORE. HE GROWS IT JUST FOR FAMILY USE. AS A FAMILY, YOUR ENTIRELY LIVELIHOOD CAN BE TURNED UPSIDE DOWN BY THE WHIMS AND TRENDS OF THE FLUCTUATING MARKET.

The woman from the park walks home from the grocery shop and says ARE YOU HUNGRY?

A girl says YEAH.

Ann says MEANWHILE, IN NORTH AMERICA, WE KEEP GETTING TIPS OF THE LATEST FLAVOUR OF THE MONTH SUPERFOOD FROM CELEBRITY CHEFS AND NUTRITIONISTS.

A YouTube guy says EASILY DIGESTIBLE AND NON-FATTENING.

Ann says COCONUT HAS BEEN AROUND FOR DECADES. I REMEMBER EATING IT IN DESSERTS LIKE MACAROONS AND PINK SNOWBALLS- NOT PARTICULARLY HEALTHY- BUT ABOUT TEN YEARS AGO CELEBRITIES CAUGHT ON TO THE BENEFITS OF FRESH COCONUT JUICE, WHICH IS FULL OF ELECTROLYTES AND NUTRIENTS. MADONNA LOVED IT SO MUCH SHE BOUGHT A COMPANY. EVERYONE SAYS YOU SHOULD COOK WITH VIRGIN COCONUT OIL, DERIVED FROM SHREDDED COCONUTS. IT'S HIGH IN B AND C VITAMINS AND PROTEIN. WHILE VIRGIN COCONUT OIL IS A SATURATED FAT, IT'S ALSO HIGH IN LAURIC ACID, WHICH IS GOOD FOR YOUR BRAIN AND HEART, AND IS STABLE, EVEN WITH HIGH HEAT.

A clip shows images of the Phillipines.

Ann says THE WORLD'S LARGEST PRODUCER OF THE SWEET SUPERFOOD IS THE PHILIPPINES, WHERE A QUARTER OF ALL THE AGRICULTURAL LAND IS DEVOTED TO GROWING COCONUTS.

Susan is in his thirties, with long brown hair in a bun and wears floral cropped trousers and a white sweater.

She says I LIVE IN POBLACIAN, ALOGUINSAN CEBU. KEN? [MY NAME IS] SUSAN ALCOS, I'M A SINGLE PARENT. WE PLANT VEGETABLES, ROOT CROPS, CORN, COCONUT AND BANANA.

Susan says HARVESTING THE COCONUT DEPENDS ON THE CLIMATE. SO WE HARVEST QUARTERLY. WE SELL OUR EXCESS CROP IN THE MARKET. THAT'S OUR SOURCE OF INCOME.

A clip shows a young boy climbing up a palm tree to harvest coconuts.

Ken is 8, with short wavy brown hair and wears black Bermuda shorts and a striped T-shirt.

He says I AM KEN CADAVERO. I'M 8 YEARS OLD. I HELP CARRY THE COCONUTS FROM THE FIELD TO THE PLANT. WHEN I GET THE COCONUTS, I'M HAPPY. BECAUSE I CAN ALSO EAT THEM.

Susan says KEN IS MY NEPHEW. HIS MOM DIED. HE IS SPOILED BECAUSE MY MOTHER LOVES HIM. WHATEVER HE ASKS, MY MOTHER GIVES IT TO HIM. WE ALL LOVE HIM BUT HE CAN BE A HANDFUL BECAUSE HE IS A BOY AND THEY GET INTO TROUBLE. KEN SOMETIMES TALKS BACK. WHAT WE HAVE IS WHAT WE COOK. WE RARELY BUY.

Ann says FOR SUSAN ALCOS, LIFE IS ALMOST PERFECT. SHE CAN FEED HER EXTENDED FAMILY, AND WITH THE HELP OF A LOCAL FAIR TRADE GROUP SHE'LL BE ABLE TO MAKE EXTRA INCOME WITH HER COCONUT CROPS.

Gigi says HELLO, GOOD AFTERNOON SUSAN.

Gigi is in her fifties, with chin length straight brown hair and wears jeans and a neon green T-shirt.

Susan says HI AUNTIE GI, HOW ARE YOU? JERICHO! GOOD AFTERNOON, JERICHO. MA'AM GIGI, SHE MANAGES THE FAIR TRADE.

Ann says GIGI'S WITH THE SEVEN PARTNER IN FAIR TRADE CENTRE, AN ORGANIZATION HELPING SUSAN AND LOCAL FARMERS. THEY'RE INSTALLING MACHINES IN THIS SHARED PROCESSING HUT SO THEY CAN SHRED THEIR COCONUT AND SELL THEM TO BE MADE INTO VIRGIN COCONUT OIL.

Susan says THE DELIVERY OF SAND WAS LATE. THEY ASKED HOW MANY COCONUTS WILL BE PROCESSED? I SAID WE ARE NOT SURE IF WE CAN PRODUCE 100 KILOS IN FEBRUARY.

Gigi says IT'S IMPORTANT THAT WE IMPROVE THIS FIRST. THEN WE WILL INSTALL THE NEW EQUIPMENT.

Susan says COCONUT HAS MANY OTHER USES. YOU CAN DRINK THE FRESH EXTRACT OF THE COCONUT MILK BEFORE YOU EAT. IT CAN CLEANSE YOUR GUT AND HELPS IN RELEASING TOXINS OF THE BODY.

Ann says SPENDING TIME WITH SUSAN, I LEARNED OF OTHER AMAZING FOODS GROWN LOCALLY THAT COULD BE CLASSIFIED AS SUPERFOODS, WE JUST HAVEN'T HEARD ABOUT THEM YET.

Gigi says THE MORINGA IS A MIRACLE VEGETABLE IN THE PHILIPPINES. IT'S SIX TIMES RICHER IN VITAMIN C THAN ORANGE.

Ann says IT'S ALSO HIGH IN VITAMIN A, C, B6 AND IRON. SUSAN MAKES MORINGA SOUP EVERY OTHER DAY AND IT'S JUST STARTING TO MAKE AN APPEARANCE IN THE WEST AS THE TEA THAT'S RICH IN ANTI-OXIDANTS AND ANTI-INFLAMMATORIES, WHILE ALSO LOWERING BLOOD SUGAR AND CHOLESTEROL, WHICH SOUNDS AMAZING, RIGHT? I'VE TRIED IT AND IT HAS A NICE EARTHY FLAVOUR, MILDER THAN GREEN TEA, BUT I THINK SUSAN'S SOUP IS PROBABLY TASTIER. WHILE THE RENOVATION DELAYS ARE FRUSTRATING, THERE'S AN EVEN BIGGER THREAT LURKING IN THE BACKGROUND.

(INDISTINCT CHATTER)

(ROOSTER CROWING IN DISTANCE)

Ann says AS THE FARMERS GET PROCESSING MACHINES SO THEY CAN SELL THEIR COCONUT INTO THE PROFITABLE SUPERFOOD INDUSTRY, THEIR LIVELIHOOD IS NOW BEING THREATENED BY A LAND DISPUTE, A DISPUTE THAT COULD NOW CHANGE EVERYTHING.

(CATTLE LOWING)

Ann says SUSAN'S NOT ALONE IN THIS. THE SAN ROQUE FARMERS ASSOCIATION OFFERS A UNITED FRONT AGAINST A LOCAL DEVELOPER WHO WANTS TO REZONE A HUNDRED AND SIXTY EIGHT HECTARES OF PRIME AGRICULTURAL LAND AND SELL IT AS A HIGHLY PROFITABLE COMMERCIAL ZONE.

(ROOSTER CROWING IN DISTANCE)

Gigi says THE LANDS ARE BEING CONTESTED ARE ACTUALLY PUBLIC LANDS AND THERE ARE NO TITLES FOR THAT LAND, AND SO THE FARMERS THAT HAVE BEEN THERE FOR GENERATIONS SHOULD HAVE THE RIGHT FOR THE OWNERSHIP OF THE LAND.

Susan says IN 2011, THE GRANDCHILDREN [SIC] OF [THE FORMER MAYOR] FELIX GANTUANGCO WANTED TO CLAIM 168 HECTARES OF OUR FARMLAND AND BUILD A FENCE AROUND IT. THE FARMERS REFUSED AND RESISTED.EARLY THIS MORNING, AUNT DIDITH AND I WENT TO SAN ROQUE FARMER'S ASSOCIATION BECAUSE IT'S THEIR ANNIVERSARY. AUNT DIDITH AND I ARE CLOSE. IF THERE ARE PROBLEMS OR STRUGGLES ABOUT THE LAND WE SUPPORT THEM.

At a local meeting, a speaker says THE LAND THAT WE TILL HERE WAS CLAIMED BY FELIX GANTUANGCO IN 1936. THEY PRETENDED TO BE THE OWNERS OF THE LAND, BUT WE ARE THE REAL OWNERS OF THE LAND. HE FILED DIFFERENT CASES AGAINST US TO FORCE THE FARMERS OUT OF THE LAND HERE IN BONBON

Ann says THE CONFLICT CAME TO A HEAD WHEN POLICE CLASHED WITH DEMONSTRATORS TRYING TO BLOCK THE GANTUANGCO CLAIM FOR THAT LAND.

Different pictures of the protest appear on screen.

A clip shows images of people fighting at the protest.

(INDISTINCT SHOUTING)

(INDISTINCT CHATTER)

Susan says 39 FARMERS WERE ARRESTED INCLUDING 3 STUDENTS FROM UP, AUNT DIDITH, ME, NANG ANDREA, MY MOTHER AND MY MOTHER'S SISTER. 5 POLICE TIED ME UP. TWO POLICE CHIEFS WERE AT ME. THEY CONTINUOUSLY PUSHED ME TO THE CAR. THEY HIT ME WITH A BATON.

Susan wipes her tears and says MY DRESS WAS PULLED UP ALL THE WAY HERE. I SCREAMED, "ARE YOU GOING TO RAPE ME? PLEASE DON'T RAPE ME!" IT IS OUR RIGHT TO PROTECT THE LAND WE TILL. WHY? WHY ARE YOU DOING THIS TO US? WE ARE ONLY FEEDING YOU! IF THERE ARE NO FARMERS, YOU WILL NOT BE ABLE TO EAT!

The speaker says WE SHOULD NOT BE ABUSED BECAUSE WE ARE FEEDING THE WHOLE NATION.

(ROOSTER CROWING)

Ann says AS SUSAN AND THE FARMERS CONTINUE WITH THEIR COCONUT HARVEST, GIGI HOPES TO MEET WITH THE GANTUANGCO FAMILY'S LAWYER TO GET THEIR SIDE OF THE STORY. THE SMALL COCONUT PROCESSING PLANT IS FINALLY UP AND RUNNING, NOW THE FARMERS CAN START THE PROCESS OF DESICCATING THEIR COCONUTS SO IT CAN BE MADE INTO VIRGIN COCONUT OIL.

Gigi says WE HAD TO DESIGN THE SHED AND THEN ACCESS FUNDS TO BE ABLE TO BUILD THIS TECHNOLOGY, THE BASIC TECHNOLOGY FOR DESICCATING COCONUTS.

Susan says COMPARED TO OTHER PRODUCTS, THIS IS AN EXPENSIVE PROCESS FOR US FARMERS. BEFORE FAIR TRADE CAME IN TO BUY OUR COCONUTS THE LOCAL BUSINESSMAN PAID US 2.50 PESOS. WHILE SPFTC BUYS THE WHOLE COCONUT FOR 5 PESOS. NOW THAT IT'S BEING PROCESSED WE CAN ALSO BENEFIT FROM THE RAW MATERIALS.

Ann says THE NEWLY UPGRADE PLANT ULTIMATELY MEANS THE FARMERS CAN MAKE MORE MONEY OFF THEIR COCONUT CROPS BY HAVING IT PROCESSED INTO VIRGIN COCONUT OIL. I HAVE TO SAY, BEFORE I STARTED THIS JOURNEY I WAS A LITTLE SKEPTICAL ABOUT FAIR TRADE. I HAD NO IDEA WHETHER IT WAS REALLY HELPING SMALL FARMERS. BUT HAVING MET SUSAN AND GIGI AND SEEING WHAT'S HAPPENING ON THE GROUND, I HAVE ABSOLUTELY NO DOUBT. IF IT COSTS ME A LITTLE EXTRA TO SUPPORT FARMERS LIKE SUSAN, I'M HAPPY TO DO THAT. AS I LEARNED MORE ABOUT THE FARMING FAMILIES THAT GROW THE FOOD WE BUY, I REALIZED HOW DISCONNECTED WE ARE IN THE CITY. I THOUGHT THAT STARTING A SMALL GARDEN WOULD HELP ME DAUGHTERS UNDERSTAND WHAT GOES INTO GROWING GOOD FOOD.

Ann says WHAT KIND OF TOMATO PLANT DO YOU THINK THAT ONE- THAT ONE NEEDS WATER, DOESN'T IT?

One of her daughters says WE DO A LINE OF THESE LIKE THIS?

Ann says YEAH, I THINK THAT WILL LOOK GOOD. ZUCCHINI.

Ann says IT MAY NOT SEEM LIKE MUCH, THIS TINY GARDEN IN THE CITY, BUT WE CAN GET OUR HANDS DIRTY AND REMEMBER THAT FOOD DOESN'T JUST SPROUT FROM THE SUPERMARKET SHELVES.

In the garden, Ann gets a plant in the ground and says THERE.

The girl says CAN I DO THE NEXT ONE?

Ann says YES, LET'S DO ONE
RIGHT HERE.

The caption changes to "Ethiopia."

Ann says YOU PROBABLY HAVEN'T HEARD OF ETHIOPIA'S STAPLE GRAIN, TEFF. IT'S A TINY GRAIN THAT'S VERY HIGH IN IRON, PROTEIN, MANGANESE AND CALCIUM. AND LIKE QUINOA IN BOLIVIA, IT'S BEEN PART OF THE ETHIOPIAN DIET FOR CENTURIES. THE ETHIOPIAN GOVERNMENT BANNED THE EXPORT OF TEFF AFTER WATCHING BOLIVIAN FARMERS GET BUFFETED BY QUINOA MARKET FLUCTUATIONS. THEY DIDN'T WANT THE SAME THING HAPPENING IN ETHIPOIA, WHERE TEFF IS CRUCIAL IN EVERY MEAL THEY EAT. GLOBALLY, IT'S ALSO THE NEWEST OF THE SO CALLED SUPERFOODS. WITH SOME CLAIMING IT'S THE SUPERFOOD OF 2017. WHILE IT COULD CATAPULT ETHIOPIA INTO THE SUPERFOOD MARKET AS QUINOA DID FOR BOLIVIA, THE ETHIOPIAN GOVERNMENT WANTS TO DO IT RIGHT IN [TAMING?] HEALTHY LOCAL FARMS THAT FEED THEIR COUNTRY FIRST.

The caption changes to "Endeg. Farmer. Father."

Endeg is in his thirties, with short curly brown hair and wears white trousers and a yellow T-shirt.

He says WE USE THE OLD TRADITIONAL INSTRUMENT TO REAP THE TEFF. IT'S EFFECTIVE AND SHARP. AFTER WE HARVEST THE TEFF, WE USE THE METHOD OF BULLS WALKING ALL OVER THE HARVEST TO EXTRACT THE SEED.

A clip shows a group of children and farmers herding cattle.

Ann says ENEDEG TESVA AND TEJE MOSU ARE SUCCESSFUL FARMERS, BUT IRONICALLY NEITHER OF THEM WANTED TO BE FARMERS IN THE FIRST PLACE.

The caption changes to "Teje. Farmer. Mother."

Teje is in her thirties and wears a blue tunic and a black and white printed headscarf.

Teje says WHEN I WAS YOUNG, MY DREAM WAS TO WORK AT A GOVERNMENT OFFICE, BUT MY FAMILY WAS AGAINST THE IDEA OF GIRL'S EDUCATION. I DIDN'T HAVE ANY OTHER CHOICE THAN MARRIAGE. I COULDN'T REFUSE MY PARENTS.

Endeg says AFTER I GOT MARRIED, I TOOK THE 8TH GRADE NATIONAL EXAMINATION. I WAS A SMART STUDENT. I DID WELL IN SCHOOL. UPON GETTING THAT HIGH SCORE, I GOT MOTIVATED TO CONTINUE MY EDUCATION. BUT MY FATHER REMARRIED AND BORE MORE CHILDREN. SO, HE NEEDED ME TO START WORKING. I [WAS] VERY STRESSED. IT SEEMED IMPOSSIBLE TO START A LIFE WITHOUT DECENT LAND. THERE WAS A SHORTAGE OF LAND IN OUR AREA AND MY PARENTS WEREN'T ABLE TO GIVE ME A PORTION OF THEIR LAND. I BEGAN PLANNING TO LEAVE THE AREA. [MY WIFE] BEGAN ENCOURAGING ME [TO STAY] BY SAYING THAT THE SMALL LAND WE HAD WAS ENOUGH TO FEED US. I GOT MOTIVATED BY HER ADVICE AND CONTINUED TO HARVEST ON THAT SMALL LAND. AFTER I BEGAN DOING THAT, I ACCUMULATED ABOUT 17 KILOS OF TEFF FROM MY FIRST ROUND. THAT BEGAN TO GENERATE MORE WEALTH.

Yiekal is 8, with short curly brown hair and wears black trousers, a yellow and green striped soccer shirt and a brown jacket.

He says MY NAME IS YIEKAL ENIDEG. I AM IN 8TH GRADE. MY DAILY ROUTINE IS GOING TO SCHOOL, HELPING MY FAMILY, AND PLAYING WITH FRIENDS. MY FAVOURITE SUBJECTS ARE BIOLOGY, CIVICS AND SOCIOLOGY. AFTER I FINISH SCHOOL, I WOULD LIKE TO BECOME A FOOTBALL PLAYER. I WANT TO BECOME A FOOTBALL PLAYER BECAUSE I LOVE THE GAME AND BECAUSE I ENJOY PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. I ALSO WANT TO MAKE A LOT OF MONEY FROM IT. MY MOTHER DOES ALL THE COOKING AND BAKING. SHE PREPARES ALL OUR MEALS.

Teje says WE SELL SOME OF THE TEFF AT THE MARKET AND USE THE REST TO EAT AT HOME. THE TEFF FIRST GETS GROUND. THEN IT GETS MIXED AND THINNED ENOUGH TO BE BAKED ON THE SKILLET. A GOOD INJERA IS ONE THAT HAS MANY DOTS LIKE THIS.

Yiekal says I LIKE TEFF BECAUSE IT MAKERS INJERA. I LIKE EATING INJERA WHEN I GET HUNGRY.

Teje says WHETHER WE EAT MEAT OR VEGETABLES, WE EAT EVERYTHING WITH INJERA. MY CHILDREN LOVE IT.

Yiekal says WHEN I AM AT SCHOOL, SHE [MY MOTHER] HAS TO FETCH WATER AND DELIVER LUNCH TO FARMERS. SOMETIMES SHE HELPS OUT AT THE FARM TOO. AT NIGHT, WHEN WE ALL COME HOME FROM WORK, SHE HAS TO PREPARE OUR DINNER, AND MAKER COFFEE, EVEN IF SHE IS TIRED. ALL THE MAN HAS TO DO IS SIT, EAT AND COMPLAIN HOW HE IS TIRED FROM WORK.

Teje says THE MEN JUST GO TO THE FARM, PLOW, SOW, ONE TASK AT A TIME. WOMEN HAVE TO DO MANY TASKS IN ONE DAY. WE EVEN HAVE TO HELP AT THE FARM.

Yiekal says WHEN I BECOME RICH ONE DAY, I WILL HIRE A MAID FOR MY MOTHER. SHE CAN TAKE A REST THEN. I DID SAY THAT IT IS GOOD TO SAVE MONEY FOR MARRIAGE BUT... I DON'T PLAN TO GET MARRIED, EVER.

(INSECTS CHIRPING)

(WATER SPLASHING)

(INDISTINCT CHATTER)

(CHATTER)

(CHEERING)

(TAPPING)

(GOATS BLEATING)

(music plays)

Ann says IT'S HARVEST TIME. IN THE PHILIPPINES, KEN PREPARES COCONUTS FOR THE DESICCATING MACHINES SO THE COCONUTS CAN BE MADE INTO VIRGIN COCONUT OIL. MILDA'S FAMILY ARE HARVESTING THEIR SMALL CROP OF QUINOA. ENDEG HAS PREPARED HIS TEFF CROP FOR THE MARKET.

Endeg says THESE ARE ALL THE STORAGE BINS FOR OUR TEFF. THEY ARE FULL WITH MAGNA QUALITY TEFF. IT'S VERY VALUED TEFF AT THE MARKET. WE ARE NOW WAITING TO SELL IT WHEN THE TEFF PRICE GOES UP. THEN I WILL SELL IT AND SAVE THE MONEY. I CAN USE THE MONEY LATER FOR MY CHILDREN'S EDUCATION AND STUFF LIKE THAT.

Ann says AS THEY HEAD OFF TO MARKET, ENEDEG HAS ONE THING IN HIS FAVOUR: TEFF WAS NAMED SUPERFOOD OF 2017, HOWEVER, AS WE SAW WITH QUINOA, GLOBAL MARKETING CAN BE AN UNPREDICTABLE ROLLERCOASTER. TO AVOID WHAT HAPPENED IN BOLIVIA AND TO MAINTAIN THEIR OWN FOOD SOVEREIGNTY, THAT IS THE RIGHT TO THEIR OWN CULTURAL FOOD, THE ETHIOPIAN GOVERNMENT RESTRICTED THE EXPORT OF TEFF AT FIRST. BUT NOW THE EXPORT BAN HAS BEEN EASED AND THANKS IN PART TO TEFF EXPORT, ETHIOPIA HAS BECOME THE WORLD'S FASTEST GROWING ECONOMY, WITH NEW GLOBAL DEMAND AND BECAUSE OF RECENT DROUGHTS, THE PRICE OF TEFF HAS SURGED.

Endeg carries teff on donkeys to the market and says GOOD MORNING.

A buyer says GOOD MORNING TO YOU TOO. HOW IS YOUR TEFF TODAY?

Endeg says IT'S A GOOD QUALITY TEFF. IT'S THE WHITE KIND.

The buyer says HOW MUCH WILL YOU SELL IT?

Endeg says I HEAR THE PRICE OF TEFF HAS GONE UP.

The buyer says NO, IT HAS GONE DOWN ACTUALLY.

Endeg says I CONSIDER YOU AS A LOYAL CUSTOMER. I WILL UNLOAD THIS FOR ONE THOUSAND FIVE HUNDRED.

The buyer says NO, I NEED A LOWER PRICE THAN THAT.

Endeg says FIRST LOOK AT THE TEFF. LET'S MAKE A DEAL QUICK SO MY DONKEYS DON'T GET TIRED.

The buyer says OKAY, I WILL BUY IT FOR FOURTEEN HUNDRED.

Endeg says PLEASE RECONSIDER...

The buyer says NO, I GAVE YOU THIS PRICE BECAUSE I AM A GOOD CUSTOMER.

Endeg says PLEASE ADD A LITTLE BIT MORE.

The buyer says OKAY, I WILL ADD FIFTY BIRR TO THAT.

Endeg says WELL, THAT'S A DEAL. MY DONKEYS ARE TIRED SO LET'S MAKE THIS QUICK.

The buyer says HERE YOU GO. YOU CAN KEEP THE CHANGE.

Endeg says LET ME COUNT IT FIRST.

The buyer says SURE YOU CAN.

Endeg says ARE YOUR BILLS ALRIGHT?

The buyer says THEY ARE, DON'T WORRY...

Endeg says I HOPE YOU ARE RIGHT... I HOPE YOU ARE NOT CHEATING THIS NAIVE FARMER. I AM TRUSTING YOU BECAUSE YOU ARE A CUSTOMER.

Ann says FOR ENEDEG IT'S BEEN A GOOD DAY AT THE OFFICE. TEJE WILL BE HAPPY, NO DOUBT. FROM HERE, TEFF IS SOLD TO AGGREGATE BUYERS IN [?], AND NOW THAT ETHIOPIA HAS PARTIALLY LIFTED THE EXPORT BAN ON TEFF, WE MAY SEE MORE OF IT IN THE WEST.

(music plays)

Clips show Yiekal in school.

Ann says IT'S EASY TO ASSUME THAT ALL SUPERFOOD ARE FROM EXOTIC PLACES, BUT WE SHOULD REMEMBER THAT JUST ABOUT EVERY COUNTRY HAS SUPERFOODS GROWING IN THEIR OWN BACKYARD AND WILD SALMON MAY BE OUR ORIGINAL SUPERFOOD. THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF SALMON FIRST FOR NOTICED IN THE 1970S WHEN PEOPLE REALIZED THAT THE INUIT IN GREENLAND HAD LOW RATES OF HEART DISEASE. THEIR DIET CONSISTED MAINLY OF FISH THAT WAS HIGH IN OMEGA-3 OILS. STUDIES OF THE JAPANESE DIET AND LIFESTYLE FOUND SIMILAR RESULTS. SUDDENLY EVERYONE WANTED SEAFOOD, ESPECIALLY THOSE HIGH IN OMEGA-3 OILS LIKE SALMON. IN 1980 YOU'D FIND MAYBE ONE OR TWO TYPES OF SALMON AT YOUR LOCAL MARKET. THE WORLD CONSUMED 550 THOUSAND TONNES OF SALMON THAT YEAR. BYT THE YEAR 2000 THAT NUMBER HAD QUADRUPLED TO TWO MILLION TONNES, AND NOW WITH JUST FARM SALMON, NOT EVEN COUNTING THE GLOBAL WILD CATCH, WE EAT MORE THAN TWO POINT FOUR MILLION TONNES OF SALMON A YEAR. WHAT'S SO GREAT ABOUT SALMON? AS WE'VE NOTED, IT'S HIGH IN OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS, WHICH IS GREAT FOR THE BRAIN, HEART AND JOINTS. IT'S ALSO AN EXCELLENT SOURCE OF PROTEIN, VITAMIN B12, POTASSIUM AND SELENIUM.

The caption changes to "Haida Gwaii, Canada."

Ann says THE COMMUNITY OF HAIDA GWAII IN BRITISH COLUMBIA HAVE KNOWN ABOUT THE NUTRITIONAL PROPERTIES OF SALMON SINCE ANCIENT TIMES, AND THAT'S ENTRENCHED IN THEIR TRADITIONS. THEY FOUGHT TO KEEP THEIR SOVEREIGN RIGHT TO THEIR FOOD DESPITE COMMERCIAL PRESSURES ON THE SALMON FISHERY.

(GROANING)

A girl wakes up, draws the curtains open, taps her sleeping brother on the shoulder and says COME ON! WAKE UP!

In the kitchen, the mom says DO YOU WANT YOUR BREAD TOASTED, NORA?

A girl balances a block pile on the table and says LOOK!

A boy says GO ON TOP.

The first girl gives her brother her blocks and says YOU CAN TAKE MINE. I'M NO GOOD AT THIS KIND OF STUFF.

The other girl says I NEED ONE MORE TO GO ON HERE.

(INDISTINCT CHATTER)

Mom opens a jar of preserved salmon feeds it to her kids.

The second girl says AHH!

(BLOCKS CRASHING)

The boy says HA HA!

As they go out of the house, Mom says GRAB MY SHOES.

The caption changes to "Jaalen. Haida. [illegible]."

Jaalen is in his thirties, with short curly brown hair and a beard. He wears jeans and a red T-shirt with a print on the front.

Jaalen says TRADITION IS JUST THE LIFE. IT'S NOT TWO DIFFERENT THINGS, RIGHT? ALL INDIGENOUS PEOPLE, WE DEPEND ON THE LAND SO AS THE CEDAR CAME- I THINK THE CEDAR IS ABOUT SIX THOUSAND YEARS OLD TO OUR ISLAND, SO RELATIVELY NEW. SALMON COME BACK TO THE RIVERS EVERY YEAR AND THE CEDAR PROVIDED US THE TREES TO MAKE CANOES AND GET OUT INTO THE OCEAN AND ALL OUR LONGHOUSES WERE MADE OUT OF LARGE CEDARS AND OUR TOTEM POLES THAT TOLD OUR STORIES. OUR CULTURE AS IT IS TODAY REALLY IS WOVEN AROUND THE CEDAR AND THE SALMON. THAT CONNECTION HAS ALWAYS BEEN THERE, AND I THINK THAT'S ONE OF THE IMPORTANT THINGS ABOUT LIVING HERE AND RAISING OUR CHILDREN HERE IS TO KEEP THAT CONNECTION.

Jaleen goes fishing.

Later at home, he teaches one of his daughters how to clean salmon.

Nora is 7, with chin length brown hair with bangs and wears a printed pink dress and a pink jacket.

Nora says DADDY BUYS OR CATCHES SALMON AND THEN HE CUTS LIKE THE BACK ALL THE WAY TO THE TAIL. THE BACKBONES ARE EDIBLE. THAT'S MY FAVOURITE PART OF IT. DAD SAYS IT'S THE HEAVIEST BIT OF SALMON. I REALLY LIKE HOW IT EXPLODES WHEN I FIRST BITE IT. I JUST WANT SOME LITTLE SCALES. MY NAME'S NORA, I'M SEVEN YEARS OLD AND I LIVE IN MASSET. MY DAD CARVES. HE CARVES A WHOLE LOT OF STUFF LIKE TOTEM POLES AND CANOES. MOM, SHE WORKS IN HER OFFICE AND STARES. SOMETIMES I SNEAK PAPER DOWNSTAIRS. SHE ALSO JUST TRIES TO KEEP HAIDA ALIVE FOR A REALLY LONG TIME.

Jaskwaan, the mom, speaks on the phone and says PROBABLY ME OR JEFF IS DOING IT. I'M TALKING TO HIM TODAY, SO.

The caption changes to "Jakswaan. Haida Mother."

Jakswaan is in her thirties, with above the shoulders straight brown hair and wears a bleu V-neck T-shirt and a colourful necklace.

She says WE FISH TWO WAYS, MAINLY. EITHER RIVER FISHING FOR SOCKEYE, MAINLY, OR OPEN WATER FISHING FOR OTHER FISH LIKE COHO, SPRING. JAALEN GETS HALIBUT SOMETIMES OUT THERE SOMETIMES, WHICH IS MY FAVOURITE.

Jaleen says WE FISH ALMOST FOUR-FIVE TIMES A WEEK, SO WE GO THROUGH QUITE A BIT.

At home in the kitchen, Jakswaan says PUT TOGETHER A SALAD. WE EITHER HAVE THEM SMOKED OR FRESH. SO WITH SMOKED WE HAVE IT IN THE SMOKEHOUSE FOR TWELVE TO TWENTY FOUR HOURS AND THEN WE HAVE IT SLICED AND UNCOOKED AND WE PUT IT IN JARS THAT WE'VE SANITIZED. THE SAME WITH FRESH. IT'S REALLY HANDY. WE HAVE IT FOR A QUICK DINNER WITH BROWNED FISH AND RICE OR MAKE A FISH HASH, MIX IT WITH POTATOES AND BAKE IT. SANDWICHES ARE A FAVOURITE. WHEN WE HAVE SMOKED IT'S THE BEST THING TO BRING TO POTLUCKS TO MIX IT WITH SOMETHING AND HAVE A FISH PATE. SO I FEEL LIKE WE'RE VERY LUCKY TO JUST BE INVOLVED IN THAT GATHERING. IF THE KIDS ARE INVOLVED WITH THAT THEN THEY CAN REALLY UNDERSTAND IT'S NOT JUST A PACKAGED SOMETHING THAT THEY'RE GETTING FROM THE STORE, IT'S SOMETHING THAT THEY'VE HAD THEIR HANDS DIRTY WITH.

Ann says JASKWAAN'S FAMILY, LIKE MANY HAIDA, PRACTICE SUSTAINABLE SALMON FISHING, CENTRAL TO THE HAIDA WAY OF LIFE. SHE WORKS TO PRESERVE THE CULTURE OF HAIDA GWAII, JUGGLING HER TIME BETWEEN HER WORK AND RAISING THREE KIDS.

Jakswaan says I DID NOT GROW UP SPEAKING HAIDA, AND WHEN WE MOVED BACK HERE AND WE STARTED GOING INTO SOMETHING THAT'S CALLED A LANGUAGE NEST AND IT HAD ELDERS WITH THE YOUNGER BABIES. SO WHAT HAPPENS IS I SPEND MOST OF MY DAY WORKING HARD AT THE HAIDA LANGUAGE, EITHER TRANSCRIBING, TRANSLATING OR LEARNING, CREATING RESOURCES OR TEACHING. AND I COME HOME AND I FIND MYSELF REALLY EXHAUSTED TO BRING IT HOME ANYMORE, SO I REALLY HAVE TO MAKE AN EFFORT TO SPEAK MORE OF IT AT HOME. (

(SPEAKING HAIDA)

Jakswaan says DINNER TIME, ZOE!

Jallen says ALL OVER THE WORLD THERE'S LITTLE POCKETS OF AREAS LIKE THIS WHERE YOU CAN STILL LIVE OFF THE LAND. IF WE KEEP TAKING AND TAKING THOSE PLACES DISAPPEAR. THERE'S NO OTHER PLACE TO GO AFTER A WHILE.

Ann says THE HAIDA GOVERNMENT WERE ABLE TO SUCCESSFULLY BAN FISH FARMS FROM THEIR WATERS TO PREVENT FARM DISEASE AND POLLUTION FROM CONTAMINATING WILD FISH STOCK, BUT THOSE WILD STOCKS HAVE BEEN DEPLETED, AS THEY HAVE BEEN AROUND THE WORLD, BY COMMERCIAL AND SPORT FISHING. SALMON PRICES SPIKED DRAMATICALLY IN 2017 AS DISEASE HIT SALMON FARMS GLOBALLY AND THE WILD SALMON CATCH DECLINED.

(JAALEN TALKING, INDISTINCT)

Jakswaan says THE OVERFISHING IS GENERALLY A PROBLEM. THE BIG COMMERCIAL LICENSES MAKE IT DIFFICULT TO HARVEST OUR TRADITIONAL FOODS THE TRADITIONAL WAY AND FISHING HAPPENING FROM OTHER COUNTRIES LAY OUTSIDE THE INTERNATIONAL BOUNDS, WHICH IS RIGHT OFF OF OUR WATERS WHERE THEY HAVE LARGER ALLOWABLE CATCHES AND IT'S THE SAME FISH.

The caption changes to "Allan. CB Islands Fisheries."

Allan is in his fifties, with short straight gray hair and a moustache. He wears glasses, a denim shirt, a blue coat and a black cap hat.

He says ALLOCATION ON LAKE CHINOOK IS- I BELIEVE IT'S SOMEWHERE IN THE EIGHTY PERCENT RANGE GOES TO COMMERCIAL FISHING. FIFTEEN-SEVENTEEN PERCENT GOES TO SPORT FISHERY AND THE REST GOES TO ABORIGINAL FOR FOOD AND CEREMONIAL PURPOSES.

Ann says IN RECENT YEARS, THE SALMON ALLOCATION FOR SPORT FISHING IN HAIDA GWAII HAS BEEN INCREASED.

Jakswaan says THERE ARE WAYS TO HAVE A SPORTS FISHERY THAT'S SUSTAINABLE AND RESPECTFUL TO THE AREA BECAUSE THAT STANDARD IS JUST NOT THERE TO JUST DO SOMETHING IN A RESPECTFUL MANNER WHERE THERE'S NO CATCH AND RELEASE, WHICH A LOT OF HAIDA PEOPLE HAVE A HUGE PROBLEM WITH, BECAUSE IT'S PLAYING WITH THE FOOD. THE INDUSTRY AS A WHOLE NEEDS TO CHANGE ITS WAY OF PRACTICING AND I THINK THE ONLY WAY THAT CAN BE DONE IS THROUGH THE PORTS, BASICALLY, BECAUSE THEY'RE NOT GOING TO JUST DO IT OUT OF THE GOODNESS OF THEIR HEARTS.

Ann says THE PEOPLE OF HAIDA GWAII STRIVE TO LIVE SUSTAINABLY, CULTIVATING ONLY WHAT THEY NEED IN THE LAND AND SEA. FOR JAALEN AND JASKWAAN, THIS ALSO MEANS FORAGING FROM THE SEA, SIMILAR TO THEIR FRIEND DAFNE.

Jakswaan says ONE THING THAT WE'VE DONE EVERY YEAR SINCE WE'VE MOVED BACK IS GONE OUT SEAWEED GATHERING AS WELL

Jaleen WELL DAFNE'S A REAL HARD WORKER. SHE STARTED HER OWN BUSINESS GATHERING SEAWEEDS AND KELPS.

The caption changes to "Dafne. North Pacific Kelp."

Dafne is in her forties, with short curly brown hair and wears jeans and a gray sweater.

She says IT'S LIKE POETRY. IT'S THIS BEAUTIFUL TRANQUIL MORNING WITH BIRDS AROUND. THIS KIND OF KELP IS MACROCYSTIS INTEGRIFOLIA, SO EVERYBODY KNOWS IT AS THE GIANT KELP. WHOA, LOOK AT THIS! IT CAN GROW TWO CENTIMETERS A DAY, THAT'S WHY I CHOOSE THIS TYPE OF SEAWEED, BECAUSE IT'S SUSTAINABLE.

Ann says SEAWEED IS A SEA VEGETABLE LIKE KALE. IT'S HIGH IN VITAMIN K, IRON, CALCIUM AND MAGNESIUM. IT GROWS WILD AND DOESN'T NEED FERTILIZERS OR PESTICIDE. IT CAN GROW UP TO TWO FEET IN ONE DAY. IT'S VERY SUSTAINABLE.

Jaleen says TO ME, AN ASPECT OF FOOD GATHERING AND TRYING TO MAKING A LIVING OUT OF IT TOO, IT'S LOW IMPACT.

Dafne says LOOK AT THAT, WHAT A SCORE!

Jaleen says TRADITIONS ARE TO GO OUT FISHING, BUT WE DON'T DO IT BECAUSE IT'S TRADITION, WE DO IT BECAUSE THAT'S WHAT WE NEED TO DO TO LIVE FOR THE YEAR. THE KIDS ARE LEARNING HOW TO FOOD GATHER AND PICK BERRIES.

Jakswaan says MAYBE GO THREE INTO YOUR BUCKET, ONE INTO YOUR MOUTH. TRY THAT LITTLE PATTERN, NORA.

Jaleen says JUST HAVING THAT RELATIONSHIP WITH THE LAND BREEDS RESPECT FOR THE LAND.

Nora says I WIPED IT OFF.
I'M EATING IT.

Another girl says OH, YEAH!
THAT'S THE YUMMY BUSH!

Nora says I LIKE WHEN I BIT ON TO IT THE BERRY GOES PSSH! IN YOUR MOUTH. IT TASTES REALLY GOOD.

Jakswaan says NORA, WE'LL COME BACK PICKING TOMORROW, OKAY?

At the beach, the family gathers wood sticks for a fire.

Jaleen says THERE'S A LOAD. PUT YOUR ARMS UP. I'M GLAD TO BE RAISING MY CHILDREN HERE. LOTS OF FISHING AND HUNTING AND GOOD FOOD AROUND ALL THE TIME, ABLE TO GET OUT AND EXPLORE THE LANDS. THIS IS OUR HOMELAND, YOU KNOW, I LOVE EVERYTHING ABOUT IT.

(BRANCHES RUSTLING)

(music plays)

Ann says THE ALOGUINSAN FARMERS HAVE STARTED TO MAKE INCOME FROM THEIR COCONUT CROPS, BUT THEY'RE STILL FACING AN UPHILL BATTLE WHEN IT COMES TO THE LAND THEY TILL.

Susan says THE THREAT TO THE FARMERS IS STILL THERE. [FELIX GANTUANGCO] STILL WANTED TO BUILD A FENCE AND SELL THE LAND TO BIG BUSINESSMEN. THE FARMERS ARE BEING THREATENED TO BE KICKED OUT OF THE LAND THEY TOIL.

Ann says GIGI HAD BEEN TO TOWN TO MEET WITH THE LAWYER FOR THE LAND DEVELOPERS.

The caption changes to "Francisco. The Gantuangco family lawyer."

Francisco is in his fifties, with short receding gray hair and wears black trousers and a white shirt.

He says IN THE PHILIPPINES, THIS IS OUR CONCEPT OF OWNERSHIP OF THE LAND. THE BASIC CONCEPT IS ALL LANDS BELONG TO THE STATE. IN THE CASE OF GANTUANGCO, IN 1937 HE APPLIED FOR A TITLE, BUT UNFORTUNATELY THE TITLE WAS LOST. THERE ARE A LOT OF IMPERFECT TITLES IN THE COUNTRY.

He meets with Gigi and Susan at a café.

Gigi says SO WHAT IS THEIR PLAN OF THE LAND?

Francisco says THEY WANT TO SELL IT ULTIMATELY.

Gigi says THAT'S THEIR PLAN. BUT THE FARMERS ARE FARMING THEIR ATTORNEY.

Francisco says OH YEAH, THAT'S THE BIGGEST ISSUE... I THINK THEY WANTED TO CONVERT THE AREA INTO A COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL HUB. HOUSING, TURNING INTO A HOTEL OR OTHER LEISURE AND RECREATION. SO THAT IS A WELCOME DEVELOPMENT FOR THE MAYOR. AND A SAD DEVELOPMENT FOR THE AFFECT FARMERS. SOME WILL BE IN THE CITY AND BECOME BEGGARS AND IF NOT, THEIR CHILDREN WILL BE PROSTITUTED OR THEY WILL BE GARBAGE COLLECTORS, ETC. OR... SO THAT'S THE COMMON PROBLEM.

Gigi says HOW THEY HAVE BEEN SURVIVING FOR YEARS HAS BEEN FROM THE LAND, NOT STEALING THE LAND GROWING FOOD AND THEN SELLING THE COMMUNITY TO ELSEWHERE. IF THEY ARE UPROOTED THE LAND DEFINITELY THIS WILL BECOME A DISASTER FOR THE FAMILIES IN SAN ROQUE, THE FARMERS IN SAN ROQUE.

(music plays)

Ann says THIS SEASON, NILDA AND HER FAMILY SOLD MORE POTATOES THAN QUINOA, A SURE SIGN THAT THE MARKETING ROLLERCOASTER FOR BOLIVIA IS TAKING A DOWNWARD TURN FOR QUINOA FARMERS. IT'S AFFECTED ROBERTO ALSO.

Roberto says THIS IS THE QUINOA I'VE SOWN THIS YEAR. THIS YEAR, I HAVEN'T SOWN TOO MUCH BECAUSE THE PRICE WAS TOO LOW. WHEN THE PRICE WAS UP, I WAS VERY MOTIVATED TO SOW QUINOA. WE COULD MAKE MORE PROFIT FROM IT FOR OUR CHILDREN. AND NOW THE PRICE IS DOWN AND OUR SPIRITS ARE DOWN TOO BECAUSE THERE ARE NO OTHER WAYS OF EARNING INCOME. SO, THE YEAR IS ALREADY OVER, WHAT CAN WE DO? THIS IS THE FATE OF US PEASANTS.

Jakswaan says THE FOOD SURROUNDING US THAT IS AVAILABLE TO US STILL IN HAIDA GWAII HAS SUSTAINED US FOR MILLENNIA AS HAIDA PEOPLE. ALL AROUND THE WORLD IT'S MORE AND MORE DIFFICULT JUST TO BE ABLE TO HAVE FOOD PROVIDED FOR YOU, LIKE YOU JUST GO AND GET IT AND THEN YOU HAVE THIS WONDERFUL FRESH FOOD. IF THE KIDS ARE INVOLVED WITH THAT THEN THEY CAN REALLY UNDERSTAND THE WORK THAT GOES INTO IT.

Ann says WHAT HOPES AND DREAMS TO YOU HAVE FOR THE KID'S GENERATION, ESPECIALLY KEN?

Susan says IF WE CAN SUPPORT THEM TO COLLEGE, BUT SINCE WE ARE FARMERS ONLY A FEW CAN FINISH COLLEGE. THEY SHOULD HELP US IN FARMING.

Gigi says FOR WORLD BUYERS, IF THEY CHOOSE THE FAIR TRADE PRODUCT FOR THE VIRGIN COCONUT OIL THEN THEY PUT THEIR SHARE IN CHANGING LIVES FOR THE SMALL PRODUCERS, THE FARMERS AND THEN WOMEN, BECAUSE FOR EVERY PART FROM THE RAW MATERIAL AND FROM THE PROCESS OF DESICCATED COCONUT THERE IS AN INCOME, A FAIR SHARE OF INCOME THAT IS GIVEN TO THESE COMMUNITIES. SO THEY ARE GIVING A SHARE OF BETTER CHANGE, OF HOPE AND ASPIRATION FOR A BETTER LIFE AND AN EMPOWERED COMMUNITY.

Teje says I CAN'T EVEN IMAGINE OUR LIVES WITHOUT TEFF. IT'S PRETTY MUCH IMPOSSIBLE FOR US TO SURVIVE WITHOUT TEFF. TEFF IS ALL WE KNOW.

Endeg says MY HOPE FOR THE NEXT GENERATION IS THAT THEY WILL USE THE NEW TECHNOLOGY TO CHANGE OUR TRADITIONAL FARMING. I LOVE EVERYTHING ABOUT HER. SHE IS MY ROCK AND MY MOTIVATION.

Teje says WHAT I LOVE MOST ABOUT HIM IS HIS WORK ETHIC. HE NEVER SITS UNDER A TREE LIKE OTHER MEN. I THINK HE'S DIFFERENT FROM OTHER MEN. HE'S NEVER IDLE. I LIKE THAT.

(SHOUTING, WHISTLING)

(CATTLE MOOING)

(MOOING)

Ann says I STARTED OUT HOPING TO DISCOVER MORE ABOUT SUPERFOODS, BUT THIS FILM IS NOT JUST ABOUT FOOD, IT'S ABOUT FARMERS AND THEIR SOVEREIGN RIGHT TO GROW AND SELL THEIR OWN CULTURAL CROPS. WHETHER THESE FOODS ARE REALLY THAT SUPER OR NOT, THE JURY'S STILL OUT ON THAT ONE. THERE'S A LOT OF INFORMATION OUT THERE, BUT WHEN IT COMES TO CHOOSING WHAT TO EAT, MAYBE WE SHOULDN'T JUST FOCUS ON NUTRITIONAL HYPE. AS WE PURCHASE WHAT'S MARKETED TO US AS SUPERFOODS, WE IMPACT FARMING AND FISHING FAMILIES AROUND THE WORLD. WHETHER IT'S GROWN DOWN THE STREET OR ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE PLANET, WE NEED TO RESPECT THE RIGHTS OF FARMERS AND FISHERS AND SUPPORT SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES THAT SAFEGUARD THE FUTURE FOR THEIR CHILDREN AND FOR ALL OF US, REALLY.

Music plays as the end credits roll.

Directed and produced by Ann Shin.

Produced in association with TVO.

Copyright 2018, Fathom Four Productions Inc.