Transcript: Daisa | Oct 22, 2012

(music plays)

Colourful letters flash by. Then, against a red background, dialog boxes read "Why Poverty?" and "Ask why!" A logo reads "TVO."

A picture of a woman sitting on the street appears next to a caption that reads "Daisa." She is in her mid-forties with short black hair and bangs.

Daisa says I USED TO FIND POVERTY
THIRD-WORLD BASED.
BUT IT'S NOT.
THERE'S POVERTY EVERYWHERE.
I WAS A STAY-AT-HOME MOM.
ONE DAY I WAS UP NORTH
VISITING BACK HOME.
MY COMMON-LAW CALLED UP, AND
HE SAID HE LOST THE KIDS.
THEY WERE TAKEN BY CHILDREN'S
AID WHILE I WAS UP NORTH.
THEY'VE BEEN IN FOSTER CARE
EVER SINCE.

(piano music plays)
A series of pictures show her sitting in an apartment holding a cigarette and looking worried. She is wearing black shorts and a blue sleeveless shirt.

A black slate reads "40 percent of children placed in foster care in Canada are Aboriginal yet Aboriginal people make up less than 5 percent of the child population. Inuit children are particularly over-represented in the Child Welfare System." Quoted from "National Aboriginal Health Organization."

She continues I WASN'T MUCH OF A DRINKER.
I WAS DEVASTATED AND I
COULDN'T GET OVER IT,
SO I STARTED DRINKING
HEAVILY.
I WAS ON THE STREETS FOR
A COUPLE OF YEARS
GOING SHELTER AFTER
SHELTER OR SLEEPING OUTSIDE.
THE MAJORITY SLEEPING
OUTSIDE.

Pictures of Daisa on the street and a cardboard that reads "Homeless please help" appear on split screens.

She continues I MOVED TO OTTAWA
WHEN I WAS 27.
KIND OF A CULTURE SHOCK
FOR ME FOR A BIT.
IT WAS QUITE DIFFERENT
AND FAST-PACE.
SEEMS LIKE IT WAS FEND
FOR YOURSELF.
IN ARCTIC BAY EVERYBODY
HELPED EACH OTHER OUT.
OUT ON THE LAND MY FATHER
WOULD TAKE ME SEAL HUNTING;
IT WAS A BLAST.
I MISS THE PEOPLE IN TOWN.
WHEN I MOVED TO OTTAWA,
I HAD TO BE ALL ALONE.

Photographs show city traffic, people carrying boxes in a small local community and Daisa wearing sunglasses standing in a snowy area.

She continues I'D HEARD OF THIS PLACE,
510 DROP-IN CENTRE,
IT'S A NATIVE DROP-IN CENTRE.
THEY CAN HELP YOU WITH
ANYTHING YOU NEED HELP ON.
LAST YEAR I WENT TO TREATMENT;
THAT HELPED A LOT.
IT DRASTICALLY CUT
MY DRINKING.
NOW I'M TRYING TO GET MY
FEET BACK ON THE GROUND.
I'M OFFICIALLY OFF THE
STREETS A MONTH AGO,
AND I'M PRETTY HAPPY
ABOUT IT.
I HAVE MY OWN LITTLE PLACE
THAT I CAN CALL MY OWN.

Black and white pictures of Daisa’s modest apartment turn into colour.

She continues OF COURSE, IT MUST HAVE
BEEN HARD FOR THEM
AT FIRST, FOR THE KIDS.
BUT NOW THEY'RE VERY
COMFORTABLE
WITH THE FOSTER PARENTS.
I'M NOT KEEPING A GRUDGE,
BECAUSE THEY'RE THERE
TO WATCH MY KIDS.
I CAN SLEEP AT NIGHT NOT
WONDERING ARE THEY OKAY,
OR WHAT'S GOING ON.
THEY'RE HEALTHY AND SAFE.
HOPEFULLY I CAN GET THEM
BACK IN MY CARE.

Pictures of Daisa looking at her children playing in the swings and holding them sitting on a sofa flash by.

The slate changes to "Ottawa-Gatineau has the largest and fastest growing Inuit population outside of Northern Canada." Quoted from "Statistics Canada, 2006."

The slate continues "An Inuit-specific approach to child welfare and family support is essential in order to build healthy Inuit families." Quoted from "Rac, L. National Aboriginal Health Organization."

The end credits roll.

Produced by, Sonia Bonspille Boileu.

www.tvo.org/whypoverty

Watch: Daisa