Transcript: The Least Deadliest Catch | May 05, 2015


A fast clip shows a school of fish in the sea, a large fishing boat with a net full of fish, a cut-open fish,the contents of a net dumped on the boat floor, and a fishing boat sailing off toward the horizon.

The Narrators says NO OTHER WILD HABITAT
ON EARTH FEEDS MORE PEOPLE
THAN THE OCEAN.
YET, 85 PERCENT OF GLOBAL FISH
STOCKS ARE NOW OVERFISHED
OR FULLY DEPLETED.
THERE IS NO PLACE FOR MARINE LIFE TO HIDE
EVEN IN AN ENVIRONMENT AS LARGE
AS THE OCEAN.

In a fast clip, fishermen pull in a catch, a shop attendant weighs some fish, and a chef adds garnish to a plate of food.
Then a title reads ”THE LEAST DEADLIEST CATCH.”

The Narrator says IN THE FACE OF THIS
SOBERING REALITY IS A SMALL
BUT GROWING MOVEMENT OF
FISHERMEN, CONSUMERS, RETAILERS
AND CHEFS WHO ARE CHOOSING THE
LEAST DEADLIEST CATCH.

Tyler says HEY EVERYONE! I'M Tyler.

(music plays)

A fast clip shows Tyler snowboarding, surfing skateboarding, scuba diving and in a plane.
A caption reads “Tyler.”
Tyler is in his late twenties with brown hair, wears a green plaid shirt, and is clean shaven.

Tyler continues AND THIS IS MY YOUNGER BROTHER ALEX.

A fast clip shows Alex water skiing, zip lining, swimming with sharks, and holding a fish.
A caption reads “Alex.”

Alex says AND TOGETHER WE'RE THE
WATER BROTHERS!

Then photos show Alex and Tyler in wetsuits and Alex with snorkels, Tyler with a camera near a glacier with Alex, and Tyler and Alex wearing red Mountie uniforms with brown hats and holding fishing nets.

Alex continues WE'RE GOING TO
TAKE YOU ON AN ADVENTURE AROUND
THE WORLD TO EXPLORE THE STATE
OF OUR BLUE PLANET.
A PLANET DEFINED BY WATER
AND ITS ABILITY TO SUSTAIN LIFE.

The fast clip continues - the two brothers are in a speedboat, a woman is pumping water, and another woman pulls water from a well.

Tyler says SO JOIN US ON OUR JOURNEY
AS WE EXPLORE THE WORLD,
LOOKING AT THE MOST IMPORTANT
WATER STORIES OF OUR TIME.

NOW THE TWO BROTHERS APPEAR AND TALK

Alex says AND TOGETHER WE WILL LEARN
HOW TO BETTER PROTECT OUR MOST
PRECIOUS RESOURCE.

THE TITLE APPEARS ON THE SCREEN -
“THE WATER BROTHERS.”

A clip shows a fish swimming through the sea, then changes to a fishing boat that is tethered to a larger boat from which fish are offloaded into plastic containers.

Alex says OVERFISHING
HAS DECIMATED MARINE ECOSYSTEMS
AROUND THE WORLD.
WE HAVE SIMPLY BECOME TOO GOOD
AT INDUSTRIALIZED FISHING,
WITH LITTLE THOUGHT OF
SUSTAINABILITY.
WE ARE LOSING A CRITICAL FOOD SOURCE THAT SUSTAINS BILLIONS OF
PEOPLE.

In a clip, a couple walks through a shopping mall, and two men point at fish behind a glass partition. the scene changes to Alex and Tyler walking through a fish market.

Tyler says WITH FISH POPULATIONS
CRASHING, IT'S MORE IMPORTANT
THAN EVER TO UNDERSTAND
THE IMPACT OF THE SEAFOOD
CHOICES WE MAKE.
DO YOU KNOW WHERE THE SEAFOOD
YOU ARE BUYING CAME FROM
OR HOW IT WAS CAUGHT?

Alex says IT TURNS OUT YOUR CHOICES
REALLY DO MATTER.
AND IF THERE IS ONE PART OF THE
WORLD ALL TOO FAMILIAR WITH THE
PRobLEMS CAUSED BY OVERFISHING,
IT IS ATLANTIC CANADA.

Old black and white photos show fishermen next to recently caught fish,, seamen looking over the fish, and the last one a dock with tables covered with fish.

Tyler says FOR HUNDREDS OF
YEARS, CANADA'S EAST COAST WAS
THE HEART OF THE ATLANTIC COD
FISHERY, ONE OF THE MOST
BOUNTIFUL FISH STOCKS THE WORLD
HAS EVER KNOWN.

A black and white clip shows fishermen in sou’westers pulling nets onto the fishing boat full of fish. Then they sort the fish into containers.

Alex narrates BUT STARTING
IN THE MID 20TH CENTURY,
FISHING PRACTICES MODERNIZED.
THE TRADITIONAL METHOD OF HOOK
AND LINE FISHING WAS REPLACED
BY INDUSTRIAL FLEETS OF FOREIGN
AND CANADIAN DRAGGERS.
THESE BOATS, ALSO KNOWN AS
BOTTOM TRAWLERS, DRAG MASSIVE
NETS ALONG THE OCEAN FLOOR
SCOOPING UP EVERYTHING IN THEIR
PATH.

A cartoon clip shows a fishing boat with a long rope attached to a net dragging along the ocean floor.

Tyler narrates BOTTOM TRAWLING
KILLS INDISCRIMINATELY,
RUINING THE BOTTOM HABITAT AND
CATCHING A HIGH NUMBER OF
SPECIES UNINTENTIONALLY, KNOWN
AS BYCATCH.

A fast clip shows a fishing boat and a massive net filled with fish being dragged into the boat. Then tons of fish are dumped into cargo containers.

Tyler continues A SPECIES THAT HELPS SUPPORT COASTAL COMMUNITIES FOR
OVER 500 YEARS AND IN MANY WAYS
HELPED ESTABLISH CANADA AS A
NATION WAS WIPED OUT.

A clip shows several fishing boats on the ocean, and then switches to several docked fishing boats.

Alex says IN 1992, THE CANADIAN
GOVERNMENT REALIZED THAT THE
ONLY WAY TO SAVE COD FROM
EXTINCTION WAS TO PUT A
MORATORIUM ON ALL LARGE-SCALE
COMMERCIAL FISHING.
OVER 20 YEARS LATER, THE BAN
REMAINS AND IT'S STILL UNKNOWN WHETHER THE COD STOCKS WILL EVER
REBOUND.

A map shows the USA and Canada and the Atlantic Ocean. Then it focuses on New Brunswick, Maine and Nova Scotia, with Halifax and Hubbard’s Cove underlined.

Tyler says IN A SMALL COVE JUST
WEST OF HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA, THE IMPACT CAN STILL BE SEEN TODAY.

Alex wears a blue shirt and a black vest. He stands on the rocks next to the water and his brother is in the background putting on his wetsuit.

Alex says OVERFISHING HAS COMPLETELY
CHANGED THE ECOLOGICAL
BALANCE OF MARINE ECOSYSTEMS
THROUGHOUT THE MARITIMES
AND REALLY ACROSS THE ENTIRE
NORTH ATLANTIC.
BUT ONE OF THE ONLY WAYS TO SEE
THIS CHANGE IS TO GET INTO THE
WATER YOURSELF.
SO TODAY WE ARE GOING TO GO
DIVING, WE ARE GOING TO FILM ANY
LIFE THAT WE CAN SEE AND COMPARE IT
WITH FOOTAGE OF THIS EXACT
SPOT FROM OVER 20 YEARS AGO
TO SEE JUST HOW DRASTIC SOME
OF THIS CHANGE HAS BEEN.

Tyler wears a light blue diving suit and helps Dr. Harvey-Clark with his scuba diving equipment.

Tyler says JOINING US WERE MARINE SCIENTIST DR. Boris WORM
AND DR. CHRIS HARVEY-CLARK.
DR. CLARK HAS BEEN DIVING AND
FILMING AT THIS LOCATION FOR
OVER TWO DECADES, DOCUMENTING
CHANGES TO THE ECOSYSTEM.

The scientist dips into the ocean and an underwater view of the ocean floor appears.

Alex says HIDING BETWEEN THE
ROCKS AND KELP WERE
COUNTLESS NUMBERS OF LOBSTERS
AND CRABS.
AT FIRST GLANCE, THESE WATERS SEEMED PERFECTLY HEALTHY BUT IT
SOON BECAME APPARENT THAT
SOMETHING WAS MISSING
LARGE FISH.

A clip shows lobsters, crabs, and small fish on the ocean floor.

Dr. Worm is in his mid-forties with curly brown hair, and is clean-shaven. He wears a black hoodie.
A caption reads “Dr. Boris Worm - Marine Conservation Biologist, Dalhousie University.”

Boris says WHEN I GO
DIVING HERE IT JUST MAKES ME SAD
BECAUSE YOU SEE AN ECOSYSTEM
THAT HAS COMPLETELY CHANGED.
IT'S UNRECOGNIZABLE FROM WHAT IT
WAS BEFORE.
AND MAYBE MORE IMPORTANTLY, ONLY
A FEW PEOPLE KNOW ABOUT THIS.
IT USED TO BE ENTIRELY
DIFFERENT.

A clip shows a big eel, a wolffish, an ocean pout, and sculpins all on the ocean bottom.
A caption reads “Hubbards Cove, Nova Scotia 1996.”

Chris says
ON AN AVERAGE DIVE YOU WOULD SEE
PROBABLY FOUR TO SIX OF THE BIG
ATLANTIC WOLFFISH, WHICH ARE
PRIMARILY A PREDATOR OF
INVERTEBRATES, SLOW GROWING,
LONG-LIVED.
ON A GOOD DAY YOU'D SEE 40 OR 50
OCEAN POUT, YOU'D SEE
DOZENS OF LARGE SCULPINS.

Dr. Harvey-Clark and Dr. Worm sit on rocks next to the coast.

Chris is in his mid-forties, wears a black wet suit and has brown curly hair.
A caption reads “Dr. Chris Harvey-Clark. Director of Animal Care, Dalhousie University.”

Chris continues
SO I WAS HERE BEFORE AND IT'S
BEEN LIKE THIS FOR THE LAST
FIFTEEN YEARS.

A fisherman throws back part of the catch into the ocean from the fishing boat.
Tyler says EVEN THOUGH
THE COD MORATORIUM WAS ALREADY
IN PLACE WHEN DR. CLARK FIRST
FILMED HERE, BOTTOM TRAWLING
HAS NEVER STOPPED AND SPECIES
LIKE THE WOLFFISH HAVE SUFFERED
SEVERE POPULATION DECLINES
FROM BYCATCH, OFTEN THROWN
BACK ALREADY DEAD.

A cartoon clip shows animals in the Serengeti and two helicopters with nets. A net drags across the Serengeti and scoops up animals.

Boris says IMAGINE YOU ARE
ON THE SERENGETI, AND YOU'RE
PULLING A HUGE NET ACROSS THE
SERENGETI WITH HELICOPTERS,
SCOOPING UP LIONS AND ZEBRAS,
AND GAZELLES AND GIRAFFES,
AND ELEPHANTS, AND RHINOS,
EVERYBODY IN ONE SWOOP, RIGHT?

Boris sits on rocks next to Chris along the coast.

Boris continues AND THEN
YOU'RE EATING SAY, THE GAZELLES,
BECAUSE THEY'RE THE TASTIEST AND
EVERYBODY ELSE GETS DISCARDED.
WE UNDERSTAND THAT THAT IS NOT A
GOOD IDEA.
WE ALSO UNDERSTAND THAT AT THE
SAME TIME, IF YOU'RE UPROOTING
THE TREES AND YOU'RE DAMAGING
THE PRAIRIE THAT WOULD ALSO BE
BAD NEWS FOR THE REPLENISHMENT
OF THOSE GAZELLES YOU'RE
PRIMARILY INTERESTED IN, RIGHT?
SO I THINK, THAT IS A METAPHOR
FOR WHAT TRAWLING OFTEN DOES
TO ECOSYSTEMS.

A clip shows a lobster on the ocean floor.

Alex says BOTTOM TRAWLING DOES
NOT JUST TAKE TOO MANY FISH, IT ALSO DAMAGES THE ENTIRE
SEAFLOOR ECOSYSTEM.

Boris says THE LOBSTERS ARE
THERE BECAUSE WE DESTROYED THEIR
PREDATORS LIKE LARGE COD,
WOLFFISH, OTHER LARGER
SPECIES THAT USED TO BE VERY
PLENTIFUL HERE IN THE
INSHORE ECOSYSTEM, AND THEY'RE
NOT ANYMORE.

A scuba diver shoots a video of a lobster.

Tyler narrates LOBSTERS HAVE BECOME
SO ABUNDANT THEY ARE COMMONLY
SEEN IN HABITATS WHERE THEY
WERE ONCE NEVER FOUND, LIKE IN
THE SAND FLATS, WHERE THEY
WOULD NORMALLY BE EASY PREY.

Boris says THE CONCERN WE
HAVE IS THAT THOSE FISHERIES
MORE AND MORE RELY ON A SINGLE
SPECIES, AND THIS IS A RISKY
STRATEGY BECAUSE IF ANYTHING
HAPPENS TO THAT SPECIES,
BECAUSE OF CLIMATE CHANGE,
BECAUSE OF DISEASE,
WE'VE SEEN THIS HAPPEN IN
NEW ENGLAND FOR EXAMPLE, WHERE
LOBSTER STOCKS WERE WIPED OUT IN
RHODE ISLAND DUE TO A DISEASE.
THIS WILL HIT THIS PROVINCE AND
ALL OF ATLANTIC CANADA VERY HARD
BECAUSE IT'S THE ONE SPECIES
THAT REMAINS.
AND WHILE IT'S LUCRATIVE, IT'S A
RISKY STRATEGY TO RELY ON JUST
ONE SPECIES IN THE ECOSYSTEM.

A clip shows a fishing boat on the ocean surrounded by seagulls. The clip changes to docked fishing boats early in the morning and a fisherman climbs down a ladder onto a boat.

Alex says DESPITE EVIDENCE
LINKING BOTTOM TRAWLING TO THE
COLLAPSE OF THE ATLANTIC COD
STOCKS, THIS PRACTICE IS STILL
WIDESPREAD.
HOWEVER, THERE ARE SMALL GROUPS
OF FISHERMEN THAT CONTINUE TO
OPERATE THE MORE TRADITIONAL
METHODS OF CATCHING
GROUNDFISH USING HOOKS AND
LINE, A TECHNIQUE THAT HAS
BEEN AROUND FOR CENTURIES.

Tyler says BEAU GILLIS IS A FISHERMAN BASED OUT OF
FREEPORT, NOVA SCOTIA WHO WE MET AS HE
WAS PREPARING TO TAKE HIS BOAT
OUT FOR THE DAY.

(music plays)

A fisherman prepares the hook and lines in the back of the boat.
Beau wears a green sou’wester with a brown cap, he is clean-shaven and stands on one of the many fishing boats in the dock.
A caption reads “Beau Gillis. Fisherman - Freeport, Nova Scotia.”

Alex says SO BEAU, HOW LONG HAVE YOU
BEEN FISHING FOR?

Beau says I WOULD HAVE
STARTED GOING OUT WITH MY
FATHER AT FOUR YEARS OLD.

Alex says FOUR YEARS?

Beau says WELL JUST BECAUSE
EVERYONE WANTS TO HANG OUT WITH
DAD.
AND I'VE BEEN OWNING A BOAT AND
OPERATING A BOAT FOR FIVE YEARS
NOW.

A cartoon shows a fishing boat with a baited line that lies on the ocean floor.

Alex narrates BEAU USES A TECHNIQUE
CALLED BOTTOM LONG-LINING WHERE
A SERIES OF WEIGHTED LINES ARE
LOWERED TO THE SEAFLOOR WITH
HUNDREDS OF BAITED HOOKS
ATTACHED TO CATCH FISH LIKE
HADDOCK, HAKE, HALIBUT AND COD.

Tyler says AS WE HELPED BEAU
PULL UP THE FIRST OF THREE
LONG-LINES, IT WAS CLEAR THAT
THIS METHOD WAS QUITE EFFECTIVE
AT CATCHING SPECIES THAT HE
WAS INTENDING TO CATCH WITH
ONLY A SMALL AMOUNT OF BYCATCH.

Alex holds a live dogfish on the fishing boat and then drops it back into the water.

Alex says SO WE HAVE A DOGFISH
HERE, IT'S A TYPE OF SHARK,
AND IT'S BEEN CAUGHT ON THE LINE
UNINTENTIONALLY.
WE'RE LOOKING FOR HADDOCK AND
COD RIGHT NOW.
BUT THE GOOD THING ABOUT THIS
METHOD OF FISHING IS THAT
WHEN YOU CATCH ONE OF THESE
DOG FISH, YOU SEE THESE BIG
SPINES ON THE BACK, YOU GOT TO
WATCH OUT, AND HE'S TRYING
TO GET ME.
THE GOOD THING ABOUT GETTING
THESE THINGS ON THE
BOTTOM LONG-LINE IS THAT
THEY'RE NOT DEAD, THEY COME
UP ALIVE, AND YOU CAN PUT
THEM RIGHT BACK IN.

A fish is hooked on a line that Beau pulls onto the boat.

Alex says WE'RE TARGETING ALL SORTS
OF DIFFERENT GROUNDFISH HERE,
HOW WOULD YOU SAY THE GROUNDFISH
FISHERY HERE IN
NOVA SCOTIA HAS
CHANGED SINCE YOU WERE YOUNG,
SINCE YOU STARTED WITH
YOUR DAD?

Alex and Beau pull fish from the line. The clip changes to a fishing boat with hundreds of seagulls swarming ahead.

Beau says WELL THAT'S A
PRETTY EASY THING TO EXPLAIN,
THERE ARE NO GROUNDFISH LEFT.
NOT FOR THE LONG LINE FLEET, YOU
HAVE TO GO FARTHER FROM LAND,
WHICH REQUIRES A BIGGER BOAT.
THE METHOD OF CHOICE IS NOW
TO DRAG FISH WITH A NET.
YOU NEED TO CATCH MASS
QUANTITIES AND PUT THEM ON THE
MARKET AS A COMMODITY, INSTEAD
OF AS A FOOD.
MEN ARE JUST REALLY GOOD AT
CATCHING FISH.
THEY JUST KNOW HOW TO DO IT.

Tyler narrates EVEN THOUGH HE
DOESN'T CATCH AS MUCH AS A
DRAGGER, BEAU'S FISH ARE NOT
BRUISED AND CRUSHED IN NETS,SO HE IS ABLE TO COMMAND A HIGHER
PRICE FOR HIS FISH.

Beau places fish into plastic containers as he pulls them off the line.

Beau says I DON'T HAVE 20,000
POUNDS OF THEM IN MY BOAT.
I ONLY GOT, WELL, NOT MANY
TODAY.
THEY'RE EASY TO CARE FOR.
THEY HAVEN'T BEEN SQUISHED
INSIDE A BIG BAG WITH OTHER
FISH.
IT'S JUST A BETTER PRODUCT.
IT'S CARED FOR A LOT BETTER.
THIS IS LIKE A DYING ART.
THIS WAY OF FISHING IS JUST NOT
HAPPENING VERY OFTEN.

Beau continues to pull up fish on the line while Alex loads the line into a plastic drum.

Alex says SO THE COASTAL COMMUNITIES
ARE FEELING AN IMPACT?

A clip shows abandoned houses on the coast.

Beau says MY COMMUNITY IS
GUTTED.
I CAN TAKE YOU FOR A DRIVE
IN THE VILLAGE AND SHOW YOU ALL
THE HOUSES THAT HAVE BEEN
FOR SALE SO LONG THEY'VE ROTTED,
AND THEY'RE WORTHLESS NOW.
JUST ABANDONED HOUSES.
BECAUSE THERE IS NOTHING TO DO.
THERE'S NO JOBS.

A clip shows more abandoned houses with “for sale” signs in the front.

Tyler narrates COASTAL COMMUNITIES
HAVE BEEN HIT HARD BY
OVERFISHING, AND ATLANTIC
CANADA IS THE ONLY REGION IN
THE COUNTRY WITH A DECLINING
POPULATION.

Alex, Beau, and Tyler try to reel in a huge fish.

Beau says OH MAN!

Alex says IT'S HUGE, IT'S HUGE!

Beau says THIS GUY IS GOING
TO MAKE MY DAY IF I CAN GET HIM.
DUDE, THAT'S A NICE FISH.
(LAUGHING)

Beau says WAHOOOOO. I LOVE
THIS JOB.

Beau pulls the Halibut onto the boat from the line, while Alex watches.

Alex says HOW MUCH DO YOU SAY
THIS ONE WEIGHS?

Beau says FIFTY.

Alex says FIFTY?

Beau saysYEAH. ALL STEAK.
ALL POWER.
ALL MONEY.YOU BROUGHT ME GOOD
LUCK.

Alex says I THINK SO, YEAH.

Beau, Alex, and Tyler take a photo with the Halibut. Then a clip shows a halibut swimming in the ocean and changes to Beau spreading ice on top of the containers filled with fish. Then Beau and Alex dump the containers of fish and and ice into larger containers on the boat.

Tyler narrates THE HALIBUT WE
CAUGHT WOULD BE WORTH MORE
THAN ALL THE OTHER FISH WE
HAD CAUGHT THAT DAY COMBINED.
ALTHOUGH ATLANTIC HALIBUT
POPULATIONS HAVE SUFFERED FROM
YEARS OF OVERFISHING, BOTTOM
LONG-LINING IS CONSIDERED BY
SCIENTISTS TO BE A MUCH MORE
SUSTAINABLE HARVESTING METHOD.
ONCE THE FISH ARE LOADED,
THEY'LL BE TAKEN TO HALIFAX
TO BE SOLD AT A MARKET BY BEAU
HIMSELF, THROUGH A COMMUNITY SUPPORTED FISHERY PROGRAM CALLED
'OFF THE HOOK'.

Beau raises the anchor.

Alex says ALRIGHT WELL PERFECT,
LET'S FINISH BRINGING UP THIS
ANCHOR AND GET ON OUR WAY.

(music plays)

Beau stands on the bridge and steers the fishing boat from the ocean back to the dock. The clip changes first to a green sign that reads, “Off the - Community Supported Fishery,” to Beau selling, cutting, and showing his fish to customers in the market.

Beau wears a green shirt, is bald, and wears sunglasses on his head.

Alex narrates OFF THE HOOK WORKS
DIFFERENTLY THAN THE TYPICAL SEAFOOD SUPPLY CHAIN BY ALLOWING
BEAU TO SET THE PRICE OF HIS
FISH HIMSELF AND SELL DIRECTLY
TO A GROUP OF PREARRANGED
CUSTOMERS IN THE LOCAL
COMMUNITY.

Beau says IF ONE GUY CAN GO
OUT ON A BOAT AND SUPPLY ALL
THE PEOPLE WHO CARE THAT MUCH
ABOUT FISH, THEN WE NEED TO
CHANGE IT A LITTLE BIT SO
THAT IT TAKES MORE THAN ONE GUY.
BECAUSE RIGHT NOW THE FISHERY
IS SO DEPRESSED THAT PEOPLE
WILL NOT GO FISHING, BECAUSE
THEY DON'T EARN ANY MONEY.
IF WE CAN GROW THIS A LITTLE
BIT, IF WE CAN CONVINCE PEOPLE
THAT TAKING AN INTEREST IN
PAYING A FEW DOLLARS MORE FOR
FISH WOULD ACTUALLY MAKE A
DIFFERENCE THEN WE WOULD FIND
PEOPLE MOTIVATED
TO GO FISHING BUT RIGHT NOW IT'S
ALMOST A DEAD ART.
LONG LINING, WITH HOOK AND LINE
ON THE BOTTOM.
IT'S VERY DIFFICULT TO COMPETE
WITH DRAGGER MEN WHO CAN CATCH A
LOT MORE FISH A LOT MORE
EFFICIENTLY.

Tyler says BEAU GILLIS IS ONE OF THE LAST REMAINING
HOOK AND LINE FISHERMEN STILL
CATCHING GROUNDFISH IN
NOVA SCOTIA IN THE LEAST DEADLY
WAY.
BUT OFF THE HOOK IS CERTAINLY
NOT THE ONLY FISHERY THAT
HAS CHOSEN TO CATCH SEAFOOD
MORE SUSTAINABLY.

Its early morning, and Alex and Tyler are at the docks dressed in black.

Tyler says GOOD MORNING GENTLEMEN.

A map of Canada shows Maine, New Brunswick, PEI and Nova Scotia. Canso,in Nova Scotia, is underlined in black.

Alex appears on the dock dressed in black.

Alex says TODAY WE'VE COME TO
CANSO NOVA SCOTIA TO MEET WITH A
GROUP OF FISHERMEN WHO CATCH
SHRIMP USING TRAPS INSTEAD
OF THE MORE DESTRUCTIVE
METHOD OF BOTTOM TRAWLING.
IT'S ABOUT 5 AM, IT'S COLD,
IT'S SNOWING, BUT WE'RE REALLY
EXCITED TO SEE WHAT MAKES THIS
METHOD OF SHRIMPING SO SPECIAL.

Fishermen drop plastic cages into the ocean off the side of their boat.

Tyler narrates FISHERMAN Kevin HORN AND HOWIE JACKSON
CATCH SHRIMP IN CATAPOSTA BAY USING MODIFIED LOBSTER TRAPS
THAT ARE PLACED AT THE BOTTOM OF THE OCEAN AND
PICKED UP ONCE A DAY THROUGHOUT
THE WINTER WHEN SHRIMP COME
CLOSER TO SHORE.

Tyler narrates THE TRAPS ARE BAITED
WITH HERRING SCRAPS LEFT OVER
FROM ANOTHER FISHERY AND EACH
BOAT CAN CATCH THREE HUNDRED TO ONE THOUSAND POUNDS OF SHRIMP
PER DAY.

Alex says AND I NOTICED IN THE
TRAPS, I MEAN, THERE IS NO
BYCATCH, YOU'RE ONLY PULLING UP
THE SHRIMP.
THAT'S IT.
Kevin says THAT’S IT.

Kevin is in his mid-fifties, wears a green sou’wester and has a grey goatee.
A caption reads “Kevin Horne. Fisherman. Canso, Nova Scotia.”

Kevin says ONCE IN A WHILE, WE'LL
GET A SNOW CRAB, OR TOAD CRAB
OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, BUT
VERY, VERY SELDOM.

Fishermen pull up a container filled with shrimp onto the boat and then dump them back into the ocean.

Alex says BUT THEY'RE STILL ALIVE
WHEN YOU
BRING THEM UP AT LEAST,
RIGHT?

Kevin says OH YEAH.

Alex says JUST TOSS THEM BACK IN
AND YOU'RE GOOD TO GO.

Tyler narrates WHILE THIS METHOD
DOESN'T CATCH AS MUCH SHRIMP AS
BOTTOM TRAWLING, TRAPS HAVE
A MUCH SMALLER IMPACT ON THE
MARINE ENVIRONMENT.

A caption reads “Rob Johnson. A sustainable seafood coordinator. Ecology Action Centre.”
A clip shows fishermen with large trawling nets and the fish that are caught.

Rob says MOST SHRIMP ARE
CAUGHT BY TRAWLING, WHICH HAS A
TERRIBLE BYCATCH ISSUE.SO
YOU'VE SEEN THE PICTURES
PRobABLY OF THE CATCH OF A
TRAWL NET, AND THE AMOUNT OF
SHRIMP WHICH IS THE TARGETED
CATCH IS A SMALL AMOUNT, AND
THEN SKATES AND RAYS, AND
SHARKS, ALL KINDS OF OTHER
ANIMALS ARE THE WASTED CATCH.

A fisherman is shown pulling up the long lines that are attached to traps.

Rob continues SO THESE
FISHERMEN IN CANSO, NOVA SCOTIA,
CHEDABUCTO BAY ARE USING A TRAP,
SO IT'S A SELECTIVE GEAR TYPE,
WHICH MEANS THEY'RE TARGETING
AND CATCHING JUST THEIR CATCH.
AND THEY'RE USING A TRAP, IF
THEY ARE CATCHING SOMETHING THAT
ISN'T WHAT THEY ARE LOOKING
FOR, THEY'RE ABLE TO RELEASE
THAT BACK TO THE
OCEAN WITHOUT IT BEING WASTED.

A turnstile of shrimp appears, and those shrimp are dropped into large containers where an attendant shifts through them. The clip changes to a shrimp farm.

Alex narrates OVER 90 PERCENT
OF SHRIMP IMPORTED IN AMERICA
IS IMPORTED FROM BOTTOM TRAWL
FISHERIES OR SHRIMP FARMS
THAT HAVE EQUALLY DESTRUCTIVE
IMPACTS.

Alex, Tyler and Kevin pull lines attached to traps.

Tyler narrates BUT THE HIGH QUALITY
AND LOW ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF
TRAP CAUGHT SHRIMP CAN FETCH
DOUBLE THE PRICE OF SHRIMP
FROM OTHER SOURCES, MAKING IT
STILL PROFITABLE FOR THESE
FISHERMEN, EVEN THOUGH THEY
CATCH LESS.

Tons of shrimp are dumped out of traps into plastic containers.
A caption reads “Alan Newell. Fisherman. Canso, Nova Scotia.”
Alan is in his mid-forties and wears a black coat with green overalls. He has a moustache and wears a blue baseball cap. He stands at a dock with a fishing boat beside him.

ALAN says THEY'RE ALIVE WHEN
THEY ARE CAUGHT, THEY'RE ALIVE
WHEN WE BRING THEM ON
THE BOAT, THEY'LL LAST SOMETIMES
OVERNIGHT THAT YOU CAN KEEP
THE SHRIMP STILL ALIVE, SO
YOU CAN'T GET ANY BETTER
QUALITY THAN THAT.

Fishermen use tackle to move crates of shrimp off the boat.

Alex narrates IT WAS INSPIRING FOR
US TO MEET FISHERMEN WHO ARE SO
COMMITTED TO SUSTAINABILITY.
BUT AS GLOBAL POPULATIONS AND
DEMAND FOR SEAFOOD CONTINUE TO
GROW, THESE MORE SUSTAINABLE
METHODS WILL NOT ALWAYS
BE ABLE TO SATISFY DEMAND ON
THEIR OWN.

Tyler WE HAVE NO CHOICE
BUT TO FIND INNOVATIVE WAYS
TO HARVEST MORE FOOD FROM THE OCEAN
WHILE REDUCING OUR OVERALL
IMPACT.

A map of Canada and the USA appears, and New York City, Long Island and Connecticut are underlined. Thimble Island Oyster Co. stands out.

Alex narrates ONE EXCITING SOLUTION IS EMERGING IN CONNECTICUT WHERE
WE MET BREN SMITH, A FISHERMAN
WHO CHOSE TO COMPLETELY CHANGE
THE WAY HE HARVESTS SEAFOOD.

Bren, Tyler and Alex appear with backpacks, and the others greet Bren before they get onto the boat.

Bren says CLIMB ABOARD!
Tyler says ALRIGHT, LET'S DO IT!
Bren says THIS IS THE MOOKIE.

Alex points a video camera out towards the ocean. Alex and Bren pull lines onto the boat.

Alex narrates. He says BREN RAISES SELFISH AND SEAWEED IN AN INTEGRATED
AQUACULTURE OPERATION HE
CALLS 3D FARMING.
UNLIKE MANY OTHER AQUACULTURE
FARMS THAT GROW ONE SINGLE
SPECIES IN HIGH VOLUME, Bren'S
FARM WORKS LIKE AN ECOSYSTEM
WHERE EACH SPECIES HE GROWS
EATS DIFFERENT NUTRIENTS
FOUND NATURALLY IN THE WATER
AND PRODUCES NO WASTE.

Alex and Bren appear next to a container filled with seafood.
Bren is in his mid-forties. He wears a plaid shirt and a green and white baseball cap.
A caption appears that says, “Bren Smith. Founder of Thimble Island Oyster Co.”

A cartoon shows the ocean floor with several types of fishing traps.
Bren says IMAGINE AN
UNDERWATER GARDEN, A VERTICAL
SPACE WHERE ON TOP HERE, WE
HAVE FLOATING LONG LINES,
AND FROM THERE WE GROW OUR
MUSSELS, OUR SCALLOPS, AND OUR
SEAWEEDS, AND THEN
BELOW THAT WE'VE GOT CAGES WHERE
WE HAVE OUR OYSTERS AND CLAMS.

Alex narrates ON BREN’S FARM
EVERY LEVEL OF THE WATER COLUMN IS
USED TO PRODUCE FOOD.

Bren says THE IDEA IS TO
GROW ONLY RESTORATIVE SPECIES,
SPECIES THAT REQUIRE NO
FRESHWATER, NO FERTILIZER,
NO LAND, NO ANIMAL
FEED, AND GROW THEM ALL TOGETHER
SO IT'S AN ECOSYSTEM THAT'S
SYMBIOTIC AND WORKING TOGETHER.

A strand of seaweed is pulled up from the ocean, and Alex and Tyler taste the seaweed.

Bren says WELCOME TO SEAWEED
FARMING.
Alex says YEAH!
Bren says GIVE IT A TASTE.
Tyler says IT'S NICE AND SWEET.
Bren says YEAH, ISN'T THAT FUNNY?
Alex says IT IS SWEET.
Tyler says IT'S REALLY TASTY.

A strand of seaweed is pulled up, and Bren Tyler, and Alex detach the seaweed from the line and place it in plastic containers.

Bren says AND SO, OUR WHOLE IDEA HAS
BEEN TO DE-SUSHIFY OUR
SEA GREENS, WE CALL THEM SEA
GREENS, AND WE'RE TRYING TO MAKE
KELP THE NEW KALE.
BECAUSE TEN YEARS AGO, KALE WAS
CONSIDERED RABBIT FOOD AND
NOW IT'S IN EVERY RESTAURANT
IN NEW YORK CITY.

Bren continues AND SO IF WE CAN
HAVE THIS FOLLOW THE SAME
TRAJECTORY, WE ACTUALLY MIGHT
MOVE THIS INTO A MORE MIDDLE
CLASS PRODUCT, PEOPLE EATING IT
AT HOME.

Bren says OUR KELP IS THE SECOND
FASTEST GROWING PLANT IN THE
WORLD.
IN THIS ONE AREA,
300 BY 300 FOOT AREA, I CAN GROW
23 TONS OF KELP IN A COUPLE
MONTHS.

Alex says WOW. THIS IS GREEN GOLD!

Bren says YEAH THAT'S RIGHT.

Tyler narrates Bren SMITH WAS BORN
AND RAISED IN NEWFOUNDLAND AND
HAS BEEN FISHING ALL HIS LIFE,
PARTICIPATING IN SOME OF THE
MOST DESTRUCTIVE FISHING
TECHNIQUES FOR THE LARGEST
INDUSTRIAL FISHING CORPORATIONS
THAT SUPPLY THE FAST FOOD
MARKET.

A clip shows a fishing boat filled with containers. Abandoned factories appear, and fishing boats surrounded by seagulls.

Bren says WHILE I WAS OUT IN THE
BERING SEA, BACK HOME,
THE COD CRASHED.
THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE THROWN OUT
OF WORK, BOATS BEACHED,
FACTORIES EMPTY, AND SO THERE
WAS A WHOLE GENERATION
OF US, THERE WAS A SPLIT, THERE
WERE THE CAPTAINS OF INDUSTRY
THAT JUST WANTED TO FISH THE
LAST FISH AND CHASE FEWER AND
FEWER FISH, FARTHER AND FARTHER
OUT TO SEA.

Bren and Alex stand on the boat next to a trap of seafood.

Bren continues BUT THEN THERE
WAS A YOUNGER GENERATION THAT I
WAS PART OF, AND WE WANTED
TO SPEND OUR LIVES ON THE OCEAN.
I WANT TO DIE ON MY BOAT AND THE
SHORT-TERM STRATEGY JUST WASN'T
GONNA ALLOW THAT, IT'S A WAY OF
LIFE FOR US.
SO I WENT ON A
SEARCH FOR SUSTAINABILITY
AND ENDED UP HERE.
IT WAS A BIG SHIFT.
I HAVE MORE IN COMMON WITH AN
ARUGULA FARMER NOW THEN I DO A
COD FISHERMAN.

Alex says SO YOU'VE LOST SOME OF
THE EXCITEMENT OF THE HIGH SEAS
FISHING, THIS IS NOT REALLY THE
DEADLIEST CATCH OUT HERE.

Bren says NOT AT ALL. I CALL IT THE
LEAST DEADLIEST CATCH.

Alex says (LAUGHTER)

Bren says WE CAN PRODUCE A LOT
MORE THEN FOOD HERE.
WE'RE ACTUALLY ABLE TO PRODUCE
ORGANIC FERTILIZERS, SO WE
HAVE A PROGRAM WITH THE YALE
SUSTAINABLE FOOD PROJECT,
WHERE THEY'RE USING OUR KELP
TO GROW ALL THESE WONDERFUL
ORGANIC VEGETABLES, AND WE
ALSO USE IT FOR BIOFUEL.
SO WE CAN GROW OUR KELP IN
HIGHLY POLLUTED PLACES LIKE
THE BRONX, DIFFERENT PLACES,
AND THEN TAKE THAT AND NOT
PUT IT INTO THE FOOD CHAIN,
BUT USE IT FOR BIOFUEL.

Seaweed appears in a trap amongst seafood. A trap is pulled out of the water by Alex onto the boat deck. Bren pulls out a screen and dumps the contents into a net container. A closeup of an oyster appears.

Tyler narrates SEAWEED HAS TREMENDOUS POTENTIAL
AS A FOOD AND ENERGY
SOURCE SIMPLY BECAUSE IT
REQUIRES NO INPUTS AND HAS ZERO
DEMAND ON FRESHWATER.

Bren says AND IT'S FILLED WITH
ALL THESE MICRONUTRIENTS.
SO, SEAWEED, SOME OF THEM HAVE
MORE PROTEIN THAN RED MEAT,
MORE VITAMIN C THAN CITRUS
FRUITS, AND MORE VITAMIN D THAN
MILK.
THIS IS OUR OPPORTUNITY TO EAT
LOW ON THE FOOD CHAIN, EXTREMELY
LOW, EAT SEA VEGETABLES,
EAT DIFFERENT CRUSTACEANS,
BECAUSE FISH DON'T MAKE ALL
THESE OMEGA-3S AND ALL THESE
WONDERFUL NUTRIENTS WE LOVE.
THEY EAT THEM, SO BY EATING
WHAT FISH EAT, WE GET ALL
THE BENEFITS, WHILE REDUCING
PRESSURE ON FISH STOCKS.

Alex and Bren stand next to a trap for oysters. Bren points at an oyster in his hand.
Bren says ONE OYSTER, THIS OYSTER
RIGHT HERE, FILTERS UP TO FIFTY
GALLONS OF WATER A DAY, PULLING
NITROGEN OUT OF THE
WATER COLUMN.
AND NITROGEN IS SOMETHING WE
ALL NEED IN OUR BODIES BUT WHEN
THERE IS TOO MUCH IN THE WATER
IT CREATES DEAD ZONES.
SO THIS LITTLE GUY IS AN AGENT
OF SUSTAINABILITY.

Bren appears pointing toward the ocean. Several traps with buoys float on the water. A small island with trees is in the distance.

Bren says YOU GO OVER THERE, THAT'S
A DEAD PATCH OF OCEAN,
AND YOU COME HERE AND IT'S A
THRIVING ECOSYSTEM.
THIS IS THE BEST FISHING NOW IN
THE WHOLE AREA BECAUSE THERE IS
JUST ALL THIS STRUCTURE FOR
FISH TO COME HIDE, THRIVE,
TO EAT, AND SO I'M GOING TO
LEAVE THIS PLOT OF WATER WHEN
I DIE IN A BETTER PLACE THAN
WHEN I STARTED.

Bren takes kelp from the line.

Bren says MY VIEW IS THAT THIRTY
YEARS FROM NOW, SEA VEGETABLES
ARE GOING TO BE THE MOST
AFFORDABLE FORM OF FOOD ON THE
PLANET.
SO I'M HOPING THAT WE CAN PLAY A
BIG ROLE IN FEEDING THE WORLD.
NOT EVERYONE IS GOING TO BE
AN OCEAN VEGETARIAN, BUT WE CAN
BE PART OF THE SOLUTION TO THIS
CRISIS WE ARE GOING TO FACE
IN THE COMING YEARS.

A clip of a seaweed farm in Asia shows workers farming. The clip changes to Alex and Tyler driving on a highway.

Alex narrates IN ASIA SEAWEED
ALREADY PRODUCES FOOD FOR
MILLIONS OF PEOPLE AND SUPPORTS AN INDUSTRY WORTH SIX BILLION
DOLLARS.
ONE OF THE BIGGEST CHALLENGES NOW IS TO GET THE PUBLIC
NORTH AMERICA TO BUY AND
COOK SEAWEED THEMSELVES, SO
WE HEADED FOR NEW YORK CITY
TO SEE HOW SEAWEED COULD ONE
DAY BECOME A STAPLE OF OUR
DIET.

Alex appears carrying a white container into Louro. Tyler follows behind and they both greet David.

Tyler narrates Chef David Santos
WORKED WITH BREN TO INCORPORATE
SEAWEED INTO THE MENU AT HIS
MANHATTAN RESTAURANT, LOURO.
Alex says HEY David.
David says WHAT'S UP GUYS, YOU GOT
MY KELP?
Alex says YEAH WE GOT YOUR KELP.

David is in his mid-thirties with dark brown hair and a beard. He wears a green hat, and a black and white striped apron over a white shirt.
A caption reads “David Santos. Executive Chef at Louro.

David says FANTASTIC.AWESOME.
LET'S GET IN THE KITCHEN AND DO
SOMETHING WITH IT.

Alex says ALRIGHT, LET'S DO IT.

David says FANTASTIC.

In the kitchen, David cooks dishes with kelp. A video camera is pointed towards him. One small pot has a mixture of kelp and potatoes. The clip changes to a kelp-pork sausage stew in a white bowl, then a frying pan depicts kelp and fried rice, with an egg on top.

Tyler narrates David HAS
MOST SUCCESSFUL CREATIONS HAVE
BEEN TO SIMPLY SUBSTITUTE
VEGETABLES WITH KELP INTO OLD
AND A KIMCHI AND KELP FRIED
RICE.

David prepares a kelp dish that includes pasta made from kelp, and Alex tries it.

Alex says BUT ONE OF THE MOST
IMPRESSIVE DISHES WE TASTED
USED KELP NOT AS A SUBSTITUTE
BUT AS ITS MAIN INGREDIENT.

David says PEOPLE ARE STARTING
TO BECOME MORE HEALTH
CONSCIENCE ABOUT THE PASTAS,
SO I THOUGHT, WHY NOT CUT
RIBBONS OUT OF THE KELP, AND
DO A PASTA, THAT'S NOT
ACTUALLY PASTA, AND THEN THE
SAUCE, BE A FRA DIAVOLO SAUCE,
WHICH IS SOMETHING THAT PEOPLE
RECOGNIZE AND REALLY LIKE.

Alex says THAT'S REALLY GOOD.

David says AGAIN, YOU TASTE THE
KELP.

Alex says THIS ONE YOU REALLY NOTICE
THE KELP.

David says YEAH.

Alex says IT'S SO FUNNY TO ME,BECAUSE WHY
AREN'T WE DOING THIS ALREADY?

A clip shows the inside of the Lauro restaurant, and patrons eating the kelp-inspired dishes.
David says I KNOW.

Alex says WHY HAS IT TAKEN SO LONG
FOR...

David says I KNOW, I'VE BEEN THE
SAME WAY.
THE PEOPLE WHO HAVE TRIED IT,
HAVE ALL BEEN
EXTREMELY POSITIVE IN THEIR
RESPONSE.
EXTREMELY POSITIVE RESPONSE.
SO I DON'T KNOW WHY IT
HASN'T REALLY CAUGHT ON YET.

A fast clip shows Alex trying the kelp pasta and an audience to watch “Off the Hook”, as one seller cuts and weighs the fish.

Tyler says MANY OF THE MOST
IMPORTANT SOLUTIONS
FOR OVERFISHING ALREADY EXIST.NOW ITS UP TO CHIEF RETAILERS
AND ALL THE PEOPLE WHO BUY
SEAFOOD TO MAKE THE RESPONSIBLE
CHOICES.

Kristin is in her mid--forties with long brown hair, and wears a blue shirt that says Hooked and khakis. Dan is in his mid-forties with dark brown hair. Dan wears the same shirt, but with blue jeans.
A caption reads” Kristin and Dan Donovan. Chief Owners of Hooked-Fish Store.”
Kristin and Dan appear in their store. A display of seafood stands on one side.

Kristin says YOUR SPENDING
DOLLARS ARE ACTUALLY VOTING
DOLLARS.
SO YOU, WHEN YOU BUY, ARE
ACTUALLY VOTING FOR THE KIND OF
FOOD YOU WANT TO SEE AND YOU
WANT TO HAVE IN YOUR HOME.

Kristin cooks fish on the stove.

Kristin says I THINK THAT
PEOPLE, WHEN THEY THINK
FISH, THINK SALMON, HALIBUT,
COD…
Dan says TROUT.
Kristin says AND TROUT.AND
THAT'S UNFORTUNATE.

A fast clip shows different seafood - Atlantic Mackerel, and salted anchovies and oysters, in Dan and Kristin’s store.

Alex says ALL OF US NEED TO
DIVERSIFY OUR SEAFOOD CHOICES
AND EMBRACE THE CONSUMPTION OF
MARINE SPECIES THAT CAN BETTER
WITHSTAND HUMAN FISHING
PRESSURE.

Dan appears and attends customers.

DAN says YOU KNOW, WE'RE
ALWAYS INTERESTED IN GETTING
PEOPLE TO MOVE UP AND DOWN THE
TROPHIC SCALE AND, YOU KNOW,
NOT ALWAYS EATING TOP PREDATORS.
IT'S HEALTHIER.
IT'S HEALTHIER FOR US, IT'S
HEALTHIER FOR THE OCEANS, IT'S
HEALTHIER ALL THE WAY AROUND.

Tyler and Alex buy fish from Unhooked and say goodbye to Kristin and Dan.

Tyler says TAKE CARE.
DAN says ALRIGHT, HAVE A
GREAT DINNER. THANKS.
GOOD TO SEE YOU GUYS.

Beau sits on a boat and speaks to Tyler.

Beau says JUST READ THE LABEL, ASK
THE PERSON SELLING THE FISH
WHERE IT CAME FROM.
IF THEY CAN'T TELL YOU, DON'T
BUY IT.

A calm coast appears and then Boris speaks to Chris.
Boris says SOMETHING HAS BEEN
DESTROYED THAT BELONGS TO ALL OF
US.
AND I THINK WE NEED TO STAND UP
AND SAY WE DON'T WANT THIS TO
HAPPEN.
WE MAY STILL WANT TO CONSUME
SEAFOOD, OR NOT, BUT IF WE
DO, IT SHOULD BE DONE IN A
SUSTAINABLE MANNER.
SIMPLE SOLUTIONS CAN WORK, BUT
THERE NEEDS TO BE SOMEONE
WHO DEMANDS THEM, AND THAT
NEEDS TO BE US.

Bren appears with his fishing boat pulling up a line of seaweed.
Bren says OUR BACKS ARE AGAINST THE
WALL, WE HAVE TO FIGURE OUT
STRATEGIES OF RESILIENCE AND
ADAPTATION, AND THIS IS A
POTENTIAL TO REALLY THINK BIG,
AND CREATE THE KIND OF
SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY AND
SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEM
THAT WE REALLY WANT.
WE GET TO REIMAGINE THIS, AND
WHAT A TIME TO LIVE IN.

Tyler and Alex sit on a fishing dock. Tyler wears a purple shirt and khakis, and Alex a grey shirt and jeans.

Alex says CONTROLLING OVERFISHING
WILL BE A LONG AND DIFFICULT
BATTLE AND THE FIRST STEP TO
SOLVING THIS PRobLEM IS TO
BECOME SMARTER SEAFOOD CONSUMERS
RIGHT HERE AT HOME.

Tyler says THANKFULLY, NORTH AMERICA
IS HOME TO SOME OF THE HIGHEST
QUALITY, AND MOST SUSTAINABLE
FISHERIES IN THE ENTIRE WORLD.
AND THERE IS NO REASON WHY WE
SHOULD EVER SUPPORT DESTRUCTIVE
FISHING PRACTICES, NO MATTER
WHERE WE LIVE.

Alex says SO IF YOU WANT TO BECOME
A SMART SEAFOOD CONSUMER,
ALWAYS KNOW WHERE YOUR SEAFOOD
COMES FROM AND HOW
IT WAS CAUGHT OR GROWN.
AND DON'T BE AFRAID TO ASK
QUESTIONS AND TRY NEW THINGS.

Tyler says THE OCEAN IS THE SOURCE
OF SOME OF THE HEALTHIEST FOOD
ON THE PLANET, SO LET'S EMBRACE
AND CELEBRATE LOCAL SEAFOOD
AND DO EVERYTHING THAT WE CAN
TO ENSURE THAT THESE PRECIOUS
GIFTS CAN BE ENJOYED
FOR GENERATIONS TO COME.

A title appears: “Dive Deeper. Into the Episodes.www.thewaterbrothers.ca.”

Two animated scuba divers appear.

Alex narrates JOIN US AND DIVE
DEEPER INTO THE EPISODES AT
THEWATERBROTHERS.CA

(music plays)

The End Credits roll.

Executive Producer,
Jonathan Barker.

Producer,
Wendy Mackeigan.

Host, Director and Co-Producer,
Tyler Mifflin.

Host, Writer and Co-Director,
Alex Mifflin.

Co-Writer
Carl Knutson

Story Editor
Wendy Mackeigan


Editor
Steve Guise

Production Manager and Assistant Editor
Nathan Cohen




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