Transcript: The Making of a Motion Picture 3 | Mar 21, 1989

Elwy Yost appears in a studio. He’s in his sixties, bald, and wears a moustache and glasses. He sits in front of a sign simulating film tape that reads “Talking film.”
He holds some papers on his lap.

He smiles and says WELCOME AGAIN, LADIES AND
GENTLEMEN, TO
TALKING FILM.
ON THIS PARTICULAR PROGRAM,
YOU ARE GOING TO MEET THREE
FILMMAKERS RESPONSIBLE FOR
THREE OF THE MOST SUCCESSFUL
MOTION PICTURES IN
THE LAST FEW YEARS.
THE RACING FILM
GRAND
PRIX,
THE CRIME THRILLER
BULLITT, AND
THE CHAMP,
THE REMAKE OF THE OLD
WALLACE BEERY,
JACKIE COOPER STAR.
OUR GUESTS ARE SAUL BASS,
WILLIAM FRAKER
AND FRANCO ZEFFIRELLI.
SAUL BASS IS ONE OF
HOLLYWOOD'S BEST GRAPHIC
DESIGNERS WHO SERVED AS VISUAL
CONSULTANT ON FRANKHEIMER'S
GRAND PRIX.
WILLIAM FRAKER WAS DIRECTOR
OF PHOTOGRAPHY IN
ROSEMARY'S BABY, AND HE'LL
DISCUSS WORKING WITH DIRECTOR
PETER YATES ON
BULLITT.
OUR THIRD GUEST IS
FAMED ITALIAN DIRECTOR
FRANCO ZEFFIRELLI, WHOSE
SCREEN CREDITS INCLUDE
ROMEO AND JULIET.
HE GRACIOUSLY ALLOWED US TO
APPEAR ON THE SET OF
THE CHAMP.
OUR PROGRAM BEGINS NOW WITH
SAUL BASS TALKING VERY
SPECIFICALLY ABOUT THE
PROBLEMS HE FACED IN DESIGNING
AND SHOOTING THE RACING
SEQUENCES IN THAT GRAND
PICTURE,
GRAND PRIX.

Saul appears. He’s in his late fifties; he has receding dark hair and a bushy moustache. He wears an open neck white shirt and sits at a desk. His glasses lay in front of him.

He joins his hands and says WELL, IN
GRAND PRIX,
THE PROBLEM WAS A VERY
INTERESTING ONE.
JOHN WAS TRYING TO SHOOT A
PICTURE IN A DOCUMENTARY STYLE.
THAT IS, TRYING TO SHOOT A
STORY IN A DOCUMENTARY FORM.

A caption below him reads “Saul Bass, Visual consultant, Grand Prix.”

He continues SO HE WANTED TO SHOOT WHILE
THE RACES WERE GOING ON,
SHOOT THE STORY DEVELOPMENTS
BOTH IN AND OUT OF RACES.
THAT MEANT HE WAS UNABLE TO
SHOOT THE RACES BECAUSE HE WAS
DOING THEM SIMULTANEOUSLY
WHERE HE WOULD BE DOING STORY
DIRECTION WITH THE RACE GOING
ON BEHIND THE CHARACTERS OR
THE CROWDS AND TAKING
ADVANTAGE OF ALL THE AMBIANCE
THAT OCCURS AT EACH ONE
OF THE FORMULA ONE RACES.
SO HE ASKED ME
TO DO THE RACES.
THE OTHER PROBLEM HE
HAD IS THAT EACH RACE,
THERE WERE ABOUT SIX
RACES IN THE FILM.
FOR RACE BUFFS, SIX OR TEN
RACES CAN'T BE TOO MUCH.
BUT FOR ORDINARY PEOPLE, A
RACE IS A RACE IS A RACE.
YOU'VE SEEN ONE,
YOU'VE SEEN THEM ALL,
TO QUOTE A FAMOUS
POLITICIAN.

He rubs his chin and says SO THE PROBLEM WAS HOW DO YOU
HANDLE THE RACES SO THAT THEY
ALL HAVE SOMETHING DISTINCTIVE
ABOUT THEM THAT CAUSES YOU TO
WANT TO LOOK AT THEM AGAIN.
SO IT ISN'T JUST ANOTHER BUNCH
OF CARS RACING AROUND AND
MAKING SOME STORY POINTS.
AND THAT WAS REALLY MY JOB.
SO WHAT I DID IS
I APPROACHED,
AND JOHN REALLY CUT
ME LOOSE ON THAT.
HE HAD HIS HANDS FULL
DOING WHAT HE WAS DOING,
AND I WAS SHOOTING
THE RACES.
WE MERELY DISCUSSED
IN ADVANCE MY PLAN.
AND MY PLAN WAS TO TREAT EACH
RACE, TO GIVE EACH RACE ITS
OWN INDIVIDUAL CHARACTER.
ONE RACE WAS AN ALL-OUT GUT
RACE WHERE WE HAD THE CAMERAS
DOWN AT THE BOTTOM OF CARS AND
YOU CAUGHT THE POUNDING OF
THE CARS AND THE PHYSICALITY
OF THE RACE ITSELF AS
EXPERIENCED BY THE DRIVER.
ANOTHER RACE WAS A ROMANTIC
RACE DONE IN A TOTALLY
ELEGIAC, POETIC,
BALLETIC STYLE.
THIS IS AFTER YVES MONTAND AND
EVA MARIE SAINT FALL IN LOVE,
AND THEY ARE HAVING THEIR
AFFAIR AND THEN THIS RACE
OCCURS, SO IT IS LIKE SEEN
THROUGH THE EYES OF LOVERS.
ANOTHER RACE WAS SORT OF A
PEOPLE RACE WHERE THE RACE
ITSELF WAS SEEN IN TERMS
OF THE PEOPLE AND THE
IDIOSYNCRASIES OF THE
CROWD THAT GATHERS
AND WATCHES THESE RACES.
SO IT WAS SORT OF A
PEOPLE-ORIENTED RACE.
AND SO FORTH.
SO EACH RACE THEN DEVELOPED
ITS OWN CHARACTER.
AND THIS MADE EACH RACE
INTERESTING AND SORT OF
ACCESSIBLE TO THE
AVERAGE VIEWER.
NOW, IN ADDITION TO THAT,
I HAD, AND IT WAS A VERY
INTERESTING AND VERY RICH
EXPERIENCE FOR ME BECAUSE
I HAD NOT, UP UNTIL THEN,
QUITE HANDLED THE LOGISTICS
OF THIS KIND OF A PROBLEM.
SEE, WHAT I HAD TO DO IS I HAD
TO SHOOT THE TRIALS OF THE
RACE, THE ACTUAL TRIALS
THAT ESTABLISHED POSITION
IN THE FINAL RACE.
I SHOT THE FINAL RACE, AND
THEN I RESTAGED THE RACE TO
COVER STORY POINTS WITH A
GROUP OF DRIVERS

He moves his hands towards himself and continues THAT STAYED
ON AFTER THE RACE
THAT I SHOT WITH.
AND THE TRIALS WERE SHOT WITH
ABOUT TWO OR THREE CAMERAS.
THE ACTUAL RACE I
USED ABOUT 12 CAMERAS.
AND THEN THE POST RACE RACE,
THE ONE THAT I RESTAGED WAS
SHOT WITH PERHAPS TWO
CAMERAS, SOMETIMES THREE.
AND SINCE THEY WERE SHOT IN
DIFFERENT COUNTRIES, AND I HAD
A LOT OF CAMERAMEN, THERE
WERE MULTILINGUAL PROBLEMS.
IN THE CASE OF POST STAGING
THE RACES AFTERWARDS,
I HAD A THOUSAND EXTRAS
I HAD TO SHOVE AROUND.
SO IT WAS A PRETTY WILD
EXPERIENCE FOR SOMEBODY WHO
HAD NEVER HANDLED THAT
KIND OF LOGISTICS BEFORE.
AND IT WAS PRETTY CRAZY.
I HAD A LOT OF, I
LEARNED A LOT FROM THAT.
AFTER I GOT THROUGH WITH THAT,
I FELT I COULD DO ANYTHING.

Elwy comments I GUESS.

He says AND I THINK THAT WAS A
WONDERFUL EXPERIENCE FOR ME.

Elwy adds BOY, THE CROWDS.
GO AHEAD, SORRY.

Saul says I WAS JUST GOING TO RELATE.
ONE OF THE THINGS I HAD TO
WRESTLE WITH WAS THE FACT
I REALLY COULDN'T GET ON THE
TRACK AND COULDN'T STUDY EACH
TRACK TO KNOW EXACTLY WHAT
I NEEDED, I KNEW WHAT I
NEEDED, BUT I DIDN'T
KNOW HOW TO GET IT.
I DIDN'T KNOW WHERE I'D
HAVE TO BE ON THE TRACK
TO GET WHAT I NEEDED.
BECAUSE WE WERE HAVING
DIFFICULTIES GETTING
ON THE TRACK.
WE COULDN'T GET ON BEFOREHAND.
WE DIDN'T EVEN KNOW WHETHER
WE COULD GET ON THE TRACK
ON A GIVEN DAY.
AND WHEN WE GOT ON THE TRACK,
I NEVER KNEW WHAT SECTION OF
THE TRACK I'D SHOOT ON BECAUSE
JOHN WAS SHOOTING ANOTHER
STORY IN THE PITS
AND OTHER AREAS.
SO EACH DAY I SHOWED UP,
I JUST DIDN'T KNOW
WHAT THE HELL WAS GOING ON.
AND THAT'S, YOU KNOW, AND I
HAD A THOUSAND EXTRAS AND,
YOU KNOW, MULTI CAMERAMEN
AND CREWS AND ASSISTANTS
AND EVERYTHING.
AND I WAS LIKE
LEADING AN ARMY.
SUDDENLY, THE GENERAL SHOWS UP
AT 8.30 IN THE MORNING,

Elwy chuckles.

Saul continues LOOKS
AROUND AND HE SAYS, ALL RIGHT,
LET'S SEE, LET'S PUT THE
NUMBER ONE CAMERA HERE WITH
THE 100-MILLIMETRE LENS,
NO WAIT A MINUTE, WAIT A MINUTE,
PUT THE NUMBER TWO CAMERA
THERE AND LET'S PUT A LONGER
LENS ON, AND LET'S PUT THE
CROWD, NO, WAIT A MINUTE,
THAT ISN'T GONNA WORK.
AND JUST, YOU KNOW, EVERYTHING
GOING SOFT, AND EVERYBODY IS
LOOKING AT EACH OTHER, SAYING
MY GOD, WHOSE HANDS ARE WE IN?
THAT'S OUR LEADER.

Elwy says THE CREATIVE PROCESS.

Saul explains SO SUDDENLY, YOU HAVE A
CONDITION WHERE THE DIRECTOR
HAS NOT ONLY A CREATIVE
FUNCTION OF DOING IT,
BUT HE HAS A PERFORMING
FUNCTION OF LITERALLY

He raises his brows and continues BEING A PERFORMER,
INSPIRING CONFIDENCE,
SETTLING EVERYBODY DOWN,
AND ESTABLISHING MORALE
IN AN ARMY.
THE FACT OF THE MATTER IS
THERE WAS NO WAY FOR ME TO
SHOW UP ON THAT SET AND KNOW
WHAT THE HELL I WAS GOING TO
DO WITHOUT TAKING A HALF
HOUR TO FIGURE IT OUT.
SO WHAT I FINALLY, ONE DAY,
AFTER ABOUT TWO DAYS OF THIS,
AND I COULD SEE THE WHOLE THING
IS SAGGING, I SHOWED UP ON
THE SET ONE MORNING, YOU
KNOW, FEAR IS WONDERFUL,
THE ADRENALINE PUMPING DOES
WONDERFUL THINGS FOR YOU.
AND I SHOWED UP THIS MORNING,
AND AS I FACED MY ARMY AND A
THOUSAND PAIRS OF EYES ZAPPED
IN ON ME, AND IN PURE PANIC I
SAID, OKAY, WE'LL TAKE
THE NUMBER ONE CAMERA,
PUT IT OVER THERE.
I DRILLED MY CANE
INTO THE GRASS.
I SAID, NUMBER ONE CAMERA THERE,
WITH 100-MILLIMETRE LENS.
NUMBER TWO CAMERA OVER
THERE, 600-MILLIMETRE LENS.

He gestures to the right and left as he says I WANT ALL THE
CARS OVER THERE.
I WANT HALF THE EXTRAS IN THE
FOREST, ANOTHER HALF IN THE
STANDS, AND CALL ME
WHEN YOU ARE READY.
I KNEW THAT WOULD TAKE ABOUT
HALF AN HOUR FOR THEM TO DO.
SO EVERYBODY SALUTED, AND
EVERYBODY WENT TO WORK,
AND I CALLED MY FIRST CAMERAMAN,
FIRST ASSISTANT OVER.
I SAID, COME WITH ME.
WE GOT INTO A JEEP.
WE WENT AROUND THE CORNER OF
THE TRACK WHERE NOBODY COULD
SEE ME, AND I SAT THERE

He holds his forehead and says AND
SAID, NOW WHAT THE HELL
ARE WE GOING TO DO TODAY?
AND I FIGURED OUT MY DAY'S
WORK IN ABOUT HALF AN HOUR.
I WENT AROUND THE TRACK, LINED
UP MY ANGLES, FIGURED OUT MY
WORK, MADE MY NOTES, BY
WHICH TIME SOMEBODY CAME UP
AND SAID, WE'RE READY.
I SAID, OKAY.
WE WENT BACK.
EVERYTHING IS LINED UP.
I SAID ROLL, ACTION.

He moves his hand across the air and imitates the sound of a car zooming past.

He says VROOM.
CARS TORE, I SAID CUT PRINT.
NEXT SHOT.
AND EVERYBODY SAID, OH, BOY,
HE KNOWS WHAT HE WANTS.
I NEVER USED THAT SHOT, YOU
SEE, BUT IT BOUGHT ME A HALF
HOUR OF TIME SO I COULD DOPE
OUT WHAT I WANTED TO DO.
AND EVERYBODY FELT COMFORTABLE
AND FELT SECURE, AND THEN WE
WENT ON AND WE DID OUR DAY'S
WORK, AND I GOT THE FOOTAGE
THAT I NEEDED.
SO THIS IS A CURIOUS
KIND OF THING.
IT'S FUNNY THAT THE PROCESS
IS NOT ONLY ONE THAT HAS
ITS OWN INTRINSIC CREATIVE
REQUIREMENTS, BUT THERE'S ALSO
A SORT OF A PUBLIC ROLE THAT
THE DIRECTOR IS IN AT TIMES.
IN THIS CASE I'M WORKING WITH
STRANGERS, YOU KNOW, FOREIGN
CREWS AND LANGUAGE PROBLEMS
AND LARGE NUMBERS OF PEOPLE.
WHEN I WORK IN WHAT I CALL THE
REPERTORY SITUATION, WHICH
IS PEOPLE WHERE WE ARE
OPERATING AS A SMALL INTIMATE
GROUP WHERE WE KNOW EACH
OTHER, AND WE UNDERSTAND
EACH OTHER, THAT BULLSHIT
ISN'T NECESSARY.

He chuckles and explains BUT IT SEEMED AT THE
MOMENT NECESSARY.
AND, ANYWAY, PURE PANIC
BROUGHT THAT OUT IN ME,
AND IT WORKED.
AND IT HELPED EASE EVERYTHING
AND GET EVERYTHING DONE.
AND WE WERE ABLE
TO MOVE AHEAD.

Elwy appears in the studio again and says THE CAR CHASE IN
BULLITT
IS
PERHAPS THE MOST EXCITING AND
THRILLING SCENE EVER
COMMITTED TO CELLULOID.
IT IS THE SEQUENCE WHICH
STARTED AN ENDLESS PARADE OF
SIMILAR CHASES OVER
THE NEXT TEN YEARS.
WILLIAM FRAKER WAS THE
MAN WHO PHOTOGRAPHED
THIS FAMOUS SCENE.
HIS WORK AS DIRECTOR OF
CINEMATOGRAPHY HAS INCLUDED
THE FILMS
ROSEMARY'S BABY,
LOOKING FOR MISTER GOODBAR
AND
HEAVEN CAN WAIT.
HERE NOW IS WILLIAM FRAKER,
THE FAMED CINEMATOGRAPHER,
DISCUSSING HIS WORK ON THE
MOTION PICTURE
BULLITT.

A clip shows Elwy sitting in a living room across from William.
William is in his sixties; he has white hair and a full beard. He wears a jean shirt and a brown jacket.

Elwy says WILLIAM FRAKER, COULD YOU
DESCRIBE THE SPECIAL PROBLEMS
IN SHOOTING THAT INCREDIBLE
CAR CHASE SEQUENCE IN
BULLITT?

William nods and answers OH, YES.

Elwy asks HOW YOU HANDLE A
SCENE LIKE THAT.

He explains I WOULD LOVE TO.
AS I WAS SAYING BEFORE, I
ALWAYS HAPPEN TO FOLLOW SOME
TERRIFIC CAMERA, AND HAVE TO
COME UP TO A CERTAIN STANDARD.
AND I GUESS THAT'S WHY
YOU DO WHAT YOU DO.

Elwy says YEAH.

He continues I FOLLOWED DOUGIE
SLOCOMBE, WHOM I ADORE.
OKAY.
PETER YATES HAD MADE A FILM.
THE FILM HE WAS PREPARING,
CALLED
BULLITT
WITH
STEVE McQUEEN FOLLOWED A
FILM HE HAD MADE IN ENGLAND,
A FILM CALLED
ROBBERY.
IN
ROBBERY, THE FIRST 20
MINUTES, THE FIRST TWO
REELS WERE, THERE WAS AN
EXTRAORDINARY CAR CHASE.
A MAGNIFICENT CAR CHASE WITH
OLD TIME JAGUARS, '65, 1965
JAGUARS, OR '63, OR
SOMETHING LIKE THAT.
SO I SAW THE FILM,
AND I THOUGHT THAT
WAS EXTRAORDINARY.
I LOVE THE FILM.

He looks up and retells PETER AND I STARTED TO TALK.
AND WE GO UP TO SAN FRANCISCO,
AND WE DECIDE THERE WAS GOING
TO BE A TREMENDOUS CAR
CHASE IN
BULLITT.

A caption below him reads William Fraker, Cinematographer, Bullit.”

He continues SO PETER AND I ARE
TALKING ONE NIGHT.
AND HE SAID WHAT SHOULD WE
DO, BILLY, ON THE CAR CHASE?
AND I SAID, WELL, YOU DID
SUCH A BEAUTIFUL CAR CHASE
IN
ROBBERY.
WHY DON'T WE DO
WHAT YOU DID THERE?
HOW MANY FRAMES
DID YOU SHOOT?
WELL, HE SAID, WELL,
WE SHOT 24 FRAMES.
I SAID YOU DIDN'T
SPEED UP THE CAMERA?
YOU DIDN'T -- HE SAID, NO.
AND I SAID, THAT'S MARVELLOUS.
WELL, HOW FAST WERE
THE CARS GOING?
HE SAID, 65.
THE FASTEST THEY COULD GO.
THEY COULDN'T GO ANY FASTER.
I SAID THE CARS WERE ONLY
GOING 65, AND YOU DIDN'T SPEED
UP THE CAMERA?
THAT WAS FANTASTIC.

Elwy says BECAUSE IT LOOKED LIKE THEY
WERE GOING ABOUT 85, DIDN'T IT?

William continues 85 OR 90.
I SAID, THAT'S FANTASTIC.
I SAID, PETER, THAT'S IT?

He chuckles as he says WHAT, THAT WE SHOOT
AT 65 MILES AN HOUR?
I SAID, NO, NO, NO.
I SAID WE SHOOT AT 24.
AND THESE CARS
CAN REALLY MOVE.
SO THE CARS MOVE 100, 110,
115, BUT WE SHOOT AT 25
AND WE DON'T CHEAT.
HE SAYS, BRILLIANT.
BRILLIANT.
SO NOW WE'VE GOT ONE
PHASE THAT WORKED OUT.
THE OTHER PHASE IS THAT HOW
DO YOU TAKE AN AUDIENCE
AND PUT THEM INSIDE THE CAR?
AND I THINK THAT'S WHAT REALLY
WORKED IN THE CHASE SEQUENCE
IN
BULLITT.

Elwy says YEAH, WE WERE IN THERE.

William continues YOU ACTUALLY WERE
RIDING IN THAT CHASE.
AND THE HILLS UP AND DOWN
IN SAN FRANCISCO HELPED.
THE OTHER THING IS WE
LITERALLY MOUNTED THE CAMERA
INSIDE THE CAR LIKE THEY
HAD DONE IN
ROBBERY.
BEFORE, YOU ALWAYS HAD
THE OBJECTIVE VIEWPOINT.
YOU WERE ALWAYS
OUTSIDE THE CAR.
YOU WERE ON A CORNER,
A CAR WENT BY,
AND YOU PANNED WITH IT.
YOU PANNED AROUND THE CORNER.
COMING TO YOU, AND
GOING AWAY FROM YOU.
BUT YOU WERE NEVER ACTUALLY
RIDING IN THAT AUTOMOBILE.
THOSE CAR MOUNTS THAT WE
DEVELOPED IN SAN FRANCISCO
FOR
BULLITT
HAVE BEEN
STANDARDIZED THROUGHOUT
THE WHOLE WORLD TODAY NOW.

Elwy asks CAR MOUNTS?

He answers YEAH, SPECIAL CAR MOUNTS.

Elwy says FOR VIEWERS,
COULD YOU DESCRIBE?

William nods and explains WELL, A CAR MOUNT, WHAT WE
DID, IN ORDER TO MARRY THAT
CAMERA TO THE CAR SO YOU
WOULDN'T GET THE VIBRATIONS,
YOU HAVE TO START TO WORK OFF
THE FRAME OF THE AUTOMOBILE.
SO ONCE YOU WORK OFF THE FRAME
OF THE AUTOMOBILE AND ATTACH
THE CAMERA TO THE FRAME SO YOU
LOCK IT IN, THE CAR BOUNCES.
AND YOU LITERALLY SEE THE CAR
MOVE UP AND DOWN ON A SCREEN,
IT'S JUST AS SOLID AS A ROCK
BECAUSE YOU ARE MOVING
WITH THE CAR.

Elwy says OF COURSE.

William says BECAUSE THERE'S NO MOVEMENT.

He adds IT'S THE SCENERY
THAT'S BOUNCING.

William continues THAT'S RIGHT.
EXACTLY.
BUT THE CAR IS SOLID.

Elwy says THE CAR IS SOLID.

William goes on AND WE WOULD DESIGN EACH MOUNT
SPECIFICALLY FOR EACH SHOT.
AND THEY WOULD BUILD
THAT MOUNT RIGHT THERE
IN ABOUT 20 MINUTES.
THEY HAD SPECIAL
APPARATUS TO BUILD IT.
AND WE LITERALLY LOCKED THE
CAMERAS IN THE CARS WITH THE
ACTORS, AND SAID, OKAY, GO.
McQUEEN DID ALL
HIS OWN DRIVING.
ALL OF IT, EXCEPT FOR THE
VERY LAST SHOT WHERE THE CAR
CAREENS INTO THE GAS STATION.

Elwy says BLOWS UP.

William says PETER, WE HAD A CAMERA CAR,
SPECIAL CORVETTE ENGINE
460 HORSEPOWER ENGINE THAT
WOULD DO 140 MILES AN HOUR.
JUST A SHELL WITH A SEAT IN
FRONT AND A SEAT IN BACK,
EIGHT INCHES OFF THE
GROUND WITH A CENTRE POST
WHERE YOU COULD
MOUNT THE AEROFLEX.
WE USED AEROFLEXES.
IN FACT, THAT WHOLE PICTURE,
BULLITT
WAS SHOT COMPLETE
WITH AN AEROFLEX.

Elwy says AEROFLEX, AGAIN,
FOR VIEWERS, BILL?

William says SPECIAL TYPE OF WHAT WE CALL,
ALMOST A HAND-HELD CAMERA.
IT'S DEVELOPED OUT OF GERMANY.

Elwy asks IS IT LIKE THE STEADICAM
DEVICE WE HEAR ABOUT TODAY?

He replies NO.
IT'S JUST A LITTLE HAND-HELD
CAMERA REALLY DEVELOPED BY THE
GERMANS IN THE
'30s FOR A NEWSREEL.

Elwy says SO IT GIVES VERY INTIMATE
AND FLEXIBLE VERITE.

William says SO YOU CAN DO
ANYTHING WITH IT.
YOU CAN DO ANYTHING YOU WANT
TO DO WITH IT, AND IT'S SMALL,
ALSO, AS OPPOSED TO THE
LARGE STUDIO CAMERA.
AND ONE SHOT I KNOW THAT WE,
BY THE MARINA, IN THAT CHASE,
IN THE
BULLITT
CHASE, SAN
FRANCISCO MARINA, STEVE WAS
CHASING THE OTHER CAR, AND
WE WERE ACTUALLY CLOCKED AT
124 MILES AN HOUR.
I WAS EIGHT INCHES OFF THE
GROUND IN THE FRONT END,

He imitates the action of holding a camera on his shoulder and says TRYING TO PAN THAT CAMERA,
BUT THE CENTRIFUGAL FORCE OF
THAT MOTION, I COULDN'T MOVE.
IT WAS ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE TO
EXERT THAT MUCH, YOU DON'T
HAVE THAT MUCH POWER IN
YOUR BODY TO PUSH AGAINST
THE FORCE OF
124 MILES AN HOUR.

Elwy comments THE MASS IS SO EXTREME, YEAH.

William explains I WAS IN THE FRONT, TRYING
TO GET A SIDE SHOT OF
STEVE McQUEEN, AND SAYING,
IF I DON'T DO IT NOW,
I DON'T WANT TO GO
THIS FAST EVER AGAIN.

He laughs and says IF I DON'T DO IT NOW,
I'M GOING TO RUN HOME.
I'M GONNA GET OUT OF HERE.
I'M NOT GONNA DO THIS AGAIN.
AND PETER YATES IS IN THE BACK
FILMING, HANDLING THE OTHER
CAMERA IN THE BACK.
AND WE ARE BOTH
TRYING TO WIRE IN.
AND THE REASON I KNOW, WE WERE
NORMALLY TRAVELLING ABOUT 90
MILES AN HOUR, 95 MILES AN
HOUR, AND I COULD TELL THAT
SPEED BECAUSE THERE'S A
CERTAIN PITCH ON THE TIRES ON
THE ROAD, ON THE
ASPHALT, MACADAM.
AND I HAD A CERTAIN WHINE.
ALL OF A SUDDEN, WE'RE MOVING
DOWN THIS MARINA, AND ALL OF
A SUDDEN I SEE STEVE
START TO SPURT AHEAD.
AND ALL OF A SUDDEN I HEAR A
TREMENDOUS NOISE CHANGE ON THE
PITCH ON THE TIRES, FROM LOWER
TO HIGHER, AND WE'RE CATCHING
UP WITH STEVE.
I SAID, UH-OH, NOW I KNOW
WE ARE GOING FASTER THAN
90 MILES AN HOUR.

They both chuckle and William rubs his neck.

He continues I'M TRYING TO PHOTOGRAPH
STEVE, AND I'M CONCERNED ABOUT
THIS TREMENDOUS NOISE, AND
I JUST SEE EVERYTHING IS
WHIZZING BY, WHIZZING BY.
AT THE END, I
WENT TO PAT HUSTUS,
WHO WAS THE
CAMERA CAR DRIVER.
I SAID, PAT HOW
FAST DID WE GO?
AND HE SAID, BILLY, 124.

Elwy says WHAT?

William continues AND I SAID, THAT'S IT.
IT'S ALL OVER.
HE SAID, WAIT A MINUTE, BILLY,
BEFORE YOU SAY ANYTHING,
LET ME SAY ONE THING TO YOU.
IN ORDER TO GET THIS JOB AND
BUILD THIS CAR, HE SAYS
I PUT EVERY DIME I
HAD INTO THE CAR.
I MORTGAGED MY HOUSE TO
GET ENOUGH MONEY TO BUY.
HE SAID, BELIEVE ME, BEFORE
I LET ANYTHING HAPPEN
TO THIS CAR, I WOULD
COMMIT SUICIDE.
NOTHING IS GOING TO
HAPPEN TO THIS CAR.
OKAY, I BUY THAT.
IF YOU MORTGAGE YOUR HOUSE,
SOLD YOUR WIFE, TOOK ALL YOUR
CASH SAVINGS TO BUILD THE CAR,
I KNOW NOTHING IS GOING
TO HAPPEN TO IT.
OKAY, LET'S GO.
SO I GOT BACK IN
AND WE WENT AGAIN.
BUT I REALLY
TRUSTED THAT MAN.

Elwy asks HOW LONG TO SHOOT?

He answers IT TOOK ABOUT FIVE WEEKS TO
SHOOT THE CHASE SEQUENCE
BECAUSE WE COULD ONLY TIE
UP SAN FRANCISCO FOR LIKE
EIGHT SQUARE BLOCKS ONE
DAY OUT OF THE WEEK.
AND WE WOULD LITERALLY TIE UP
TRAFFIC AND SNARL THAT CITY.
AND THE POLICE WOULD ALLOW
US TO DO IT FOR ONE DAY.
AND THEN WE'D HAVE TO WAIT FOR
TWO OR THREE DAYS AND COME
BACK AND DO IT AGAIN.
SO OVER A PERIOD OF ABOUT
FIVE OR SIX WEEKS WE DID IT.

Elwy says HOW MUCH OF THE CITY WOULD
YOU USE AT ANY ONE TIME?
SEVERAL STREETS?

William nods and says YEAH, ABOUT EIGHT
SQUARE BLOCKS.

Elwy asks AND THERE WOULD BE CAMERAS IN
CARS AND CAMERAS ON CORNERS?

He replies FIVE CAMERAS.

Elwy says WOULD YOUR STUNT DRIVERS,
McQUEEN, ETCETERA, AND THE CROOKS,
DO LIKE A WHOLE RUN AT ONCE
WHILE THEY WERE BEING PICKED UP?
THEY WOULDN'T JUST KEEP GOING
AROUND A CORNER TEN TIMES,
YOU KNOW WHAT I'M
TALKING ABOUT?

William says NO, NO, NO.
WE WOULD ONLY DO IT ONCE.
AND WHAT WE WOULD DO
IS WE'D CHOREOGRAPH.
FIRST OF ALL, WE'D DRIVE IN
THE CARS VERY SLOWLY FIVE
MILES AN HOUR, EVERY PLACE THE
CHASE IS GOING TO TAKE PLACE.
THEN, WE'D PARK THE CARS, AND
WE'D GET OUT AND WE'D WALK IT.
HALF A MILE, OR
A MILE, WHATEVER.
WE LITERALLY, WITH EVERYBODY.
THE STUNT DRIVERS,
EVERYBODY WAS CONCERNED.
WE LITERALLY WALKED IT AND SAW
WHERE WE WOULD HAVE TO PUT UP
SECURITY GUARDS AND FIND OUT,
IN ORDER TO PREVENT ANY KIND
OF ACCIDENT, WHICH THANK
GOODNESS WE DIDN'T HAVE ANY.
AND IT WAS TEDIOUS AND VERY,
VERY TOUGH, AND THOSE STUNT
DRIVERS WERE MAGNIFICENT.
WITHIN FOUR INCHES OF WHERE
THEY SAID A CAR WOULD LAND,
THAT'S, THAT'S WHY WE
COULD PLACE THE CAMERA.
YOU NOTICE AT THE END OF THE
CHASE WHERE THE OTHER CAR
CAREENS INTO THE GAS STATION
AND STEVE'S CAR COMES AND DOES
A ROUNDY ROUNDY AND
FALLS INTO A DITCH.

Elwy says YES.

William says THAT WAS ALL ACTUALLY DONE IN
ONE SHOT WITH SIX CAMERAS.
AND I SAID, OKAY, WE'LL PUT
THIS CAMERA HERE IN THIS DITCH.
AND HE SAYS, YOU GOT IT.
AND THAT'S ACTUALLY ONE SHOT,
AND THAT GUY HIT THAT TWO
FEET OFF OF WHERE HE
SAID HE WAS GOING TO BE.
SO THEY WERE EXTRAORDINARY.
THE CHASE, I THINK, WAS SORT
OF YOU MIGHT CALL A GENRE CHASE
FOR A LOT OF
CHASES TO FOLLOW.

Elwy comments OH,
THE FRENCH CONNECTION.

He says MARVELLOUS, MARVELLOUS CHASES.
BUT WE STARTED A WHOLE THING
THAT WENT INTO TELEVISION AND
WENT ON AND ON AND ON AND ON.
AND I WAS TELLING A LITTLE
STORY BEFORE WHEN,

Elwy says FRENCH CONNECTION II.

William nods and says WHEN JOHN FRANKENHEIMER
DID
FRENCH CONNECTION II,
I LITERALLY WENT UP AND KISSED
HIM ON THE SIDE OF THE CHEEK
AT THE END OF THE PICTURE
BECAUSE I SAID AT LAST,
AT LAST, YOU FINISHED
ALL THE CAR CHASES.
IT WAS A FOOT RACE AT
THE END OF THE PICTURE
WITH GENE HACKMAN.

Elwy appears in the studio and says RECENTLY IN HOLLYWOOD WE WERE
PERMITTED ON THE SET AT MGM'S
REMAKE OF THAT OLD WALLACE
BEERY, JACKIE COOPER FILM,
THE CHAMP.
ON THE DAY WE WERE THERE THE
DIRECTOR FRANCO ZEFFIRELLI
WAS FILMING THAT CLIMACTIC
FIGHT SEQUENCE OF THIS FILM.
AND WE WERE THUS ABLE TO GET
A REAL FIRSTHAND LOOK AT THE
BEHIND-THE-SCENES MAKING OF
A VERY MAJOR MOTION PICTURE.
WE TALKED WITH MISTER ZEFFIRELLI,
THE STAR, JOHN VOIGHT, AND
VERY INTERESTINGLY, THE
MAKE-UP MAN WHOSE NAME
HAPPENS TO BE BOB DON.

A clip shows a boxing ring. Two boxers fight as the crowd shouts and cheers around them.
Elwy appears next to the ring, beside Mister Zeffirelli. Zeffirelli is in his forties; he has short blond hair and is clean-shaven.

Elwy says MISTER ZEFFIRELLI, FROM
ROMEO
AND JULIET
AND
TAMING OF THE
SHREW
TO
THE CHAMP,
SHAKESPEARE TO BOXING,
YOU MUST LOVE VARIETY
AS A DIRECTOR?

Zeffirelli says WELL, IN THE END, IS ALL
THE SAME THING, YOU KNOW?

Elwy asks HOW DO YOU MEAN?

He explains THERE'S GREAT CHOREOGRAPHY
OF MAN'S LIFE, MAN'S AMUSEMENTS.
GLADIATORS' GAMES.
YOU KNOW, SHAKESPEARE GAVE
TREMENDOUS SPACE TO THE
FENCING AND THE DUELING.
IT WAS BIG AREA.
THE AUDIENCE DEMANDED MORE
AND MORE, KIND OF ACROBATIC,
AND VERY DANGEROUS
ENTERTAINMENT.

He nods and continues IN EVERY PLAY OR TRAGEDY OF
SHAKESPEARE, THERE IS A BIG
AREA RESERVED FOR DUELS.
AND THEY WERE FENCING
WITH REAL WEAPONS.
THEY WERE, THE FAMOUS
SHAKESPEAREAN ACTORS,
THEY WERE ALL SCARRED.
BY THE END OF THEIR
LIVES, SCARS LIKE THIS,
STUDENTS IN HEIDELBERG,
YOU KNOW?

Elwy asks WHAT'S THE BIGGEST PROBLEM IN
BRINGING SHAKESPEARE TO THE
SCREEN, IN COMPARISON TO
BRINGING SHAKESPEARE
TO THE STAGE?
DOES HE LEND HIMSELF, DO
YOU THINK, VERY WELL,
TO THE SCREEN?

Zeffirelli says WELL, STAGE IS NATURALLY
HIS OWN SHRINE, DESTINATION.
BUT I THINK SHAKESPEARE
GOES FAR BEYOND A MEDIUM.
IT CAN BE EXPANDED IN
ANY MEDIUM YOU WANT.
RADIO, TELEVISION, TO,

Elwy adds IT ADAPTS VERY,
VERY WELL, INDEED.

Zeffirelli says BECAUSE IT TALKS
ABOUT REAL PEOPLE.

Elwy asks HOW MANY EXTRAS ARE HERE
TODAY FOR THIS SCENE IN
THE CHAMP?

He answers 2 thousand

Elwy says ARE THEY PEOPLE WHO HAVE
SIMPLY COME TO WATCH,
OR ARE THEY ACTUALLY
PAID EXTRAS?

He replies UNFORTUNATELY NOT.
THEY ARE ALL PAID.

Elwy says ALL PAID?

Zeffirelli says CANNOT DO ANYONE IN CALIFORNIA
WHAT I NORMALLY DID AT THE
BEGINNING OF TIME,
UNTIL A YEAR AGO.

Elwy asks HOW MUCH REHEARSAL WENT ON
WITH JOHN VOIGHT AND THE OTHER
CHAP UP THERE BEFORE TODAY?

He says ABOUT THREE MONTHS, I THINK.

A clip shows Zefirelli on the ring talking to the actors.

Elwy says AND YOU REHEARSED
THEM THROUGH?

Zeffirelli says WE HAD EXPERTS WHO FIRST OF
ALL PUT JOHN IN A KIND OF
SHAPE AS A BOXER.
HE'S ALREADY A BEAUTIFUL
MAN, JOHN, BUT HE BUILT UP
HIS BODY BETTER.
THEN THEY HAD TO
CHOREOGRAPH EVERYTHING.

Elwy asks HOW MANY DAYS ARE YOU
OUT HERE SHOOTING?

Zffirelli answers HOW MANY DAYS?

Elwy says YEAH.

He replies FIVE ALTOGETHER.
THE ENTIRE WEEK.

Elwy asks HOW MUCH OF THAT WILL GO ON
THE SCREEN IN
THE CHAMP?

He explains IT'S AN IMPORTANT SCENE.
IT'S THE CATHARSIS
OF THE TRAGEDY.

Elwy says IT'S THE BIG SCENE.
DID YOU EVER SEE THE ORIGINAL
VERSION THAT KING VIDOR DID?

He answers OH, YES.
ADORE IT.

Elwy asks IS THERE MUCH COMPARISON
BETWEEN YOURS AND HIM?

Zeffirelli says IT'S 50 YEARS LATER, OURS, SO
SOMETHING MUST HAVE CHANGED.
I DON'T NECESSARILY
MEAN FOR THE BEST.
MIGHT HAVE LOST A
LOT OF GOOD THINGS.
BUT THE MATERIAL IS
SO EXTRAORDINARY.
I WAS SURPRISED IT HAD NEVER
BEEN REMADE BEFORE ME.

Elwy comments YOU USE A LOT OF HAND
HELD CAMERAS, DIDN'T YOU?

Zeffirelli says YES.
AND HERE'S MY CAMERAMAN.
HE'S A GENIUS.
FRED KOENEKAMP.

He stands up and says HI.

Elwy smiles and says HOW ARE YOU,
MISTER KOENEKAMP?

Zeffirelli says TECHNICAL ASPECTS
OF THIS SHOOTING.

Fred is in his late forties; he has short blond hair and is clean-shaven. He wears a khaki shirt.

Fred looks at Zeffirelli and asks CAN I INTERRUPT
YOU FOR A MOMENT?

He answers OH YEAH, SURE.

Fred says I THINK WE NEED THE HIGH
CAMERA BECAUSE IT REALLY
GETS INTO THAT
RING, YOU SEE?
SO I THINK WE SHOULD
LEAVE THE ONE UP THERE.
MAYBE WE CAN MOVE THAT
ONE THERE AROUND
LIKE WE DISCUSSED EARLIER.
AROUND AND SHOOT THROUGH
ALL THE PEOPLE OVER THERE.
LEAVE THAT ONE UP THERE
BECAUSE THAT'S TAKING
ADVANTAGE OF THE CROWD.
ALSO, IT'S GOOD FOR
SEEING INTO THE RING.

Zeffirelli says AND NOW WE HAVE
THE SLAUGHTER ROUND.

Fred says THAT'S RIGHT.
SO IT WILL LET
HIM BE TIGHTER.
THIS IS ONE UP HERE.
SO WE CAN GET IN
PRETTY TIGHT WITH IT.

Zeffirelli points out I DON'T NOW HOW TIGHT YOU CAN
BE BECAUSE THERE IS GOING TO
BE A LOT OF BLOOD SPILLED.

Fred says I DON'T THINK WE SHOULD
GO ANYTHING CLOSER THAN
A FULL FIGURE.

Zeffirelli shakes his head and says YEAH, SHOULDN'T.

Fred continues YOU KNOW?
THEN RING SIDE WE'LL GET
ALL THE REAL GUTSY STUFF.

Zeffirelli nods and says OKAY.

Fred points behind Zeffirelli and says SO I'LL JUST CHANGE THAT
CAMERA THEN AND GO AROUND
THAT WAY MORE.
IS THAT ALL RIGHT?

He replies PLEASE, PLEASE.
SO YOU GOT IT.

Elwy asks DO WE HAVE A FEW MORE
SECONDS WITH YOU,
OR DO YOU HAVE TO PUSH?
WILL THERE BE THE SENTIMENT IN
THAT OLD PICTURE WHICH I SAW
WHEN I WAS SIX YEARS OF
AGE, WITH WALLACE BEERY
AND JACKIE COOPER.
HOW DO YOU UPDATE THAT?

He smiles and says VERY STRANGE QUESTION.
YOU THINK THE SENTIMENT
HAS CHANGED THAT MUCH?

Elwy smiles and says I WONDER.

He answers BUT MAN HAS
REMAINED THE SAME.
THE SAME AS HE WAS IN THE
TIME OF EGYPTIANS AND TODAY.
WE CHANGE ONLY THE
SO-CALLED PROGRESS.
I MEAN, OUR CRUST,
OUR HABITS.
BUT MAN SUFFERS, LOVES,
ENJOYS, LOVES, HATES,
EXACTLY THE SAME AS IT
WAS TEN YEARS AGO.

Elwy comments THE SAME EMOTIONS WE HAD BACK
IN SHAKESPEARE'S DAY, OF COURSE.

He replies IMAGINE IN 50 YEARS,
NOTHING HAS CHANGED.

Elwy says NO.

Zeffirelli says IF YOU CRACK A JOKE, A CENTURY
AGO, YOU STILL LAUGH TODAY.

The actor who plays the boxer leans on the ring and says I REHEARSED A MONTH
BEFORE WE STARTED.
AND I HAVE A VERY GOOD
TRAINER, JIMMY GAMBINA.
HE'S VERY BRIGHT, AND
HE'S VERY HARD WORKING,
AND WE KIND OF
PACED OURSELVES.
WHEN WE WERE IN MIAMI, WE
HAD A GYM NEAR THE PLACE,
AND WE JUST KIND OF SNUCK IT
IN AS WE COULD, YOU KNOW?
IT'S BEEN TOUGH.
WE DIDN'T HAVE MUCH TIME.

He’s in his thirties; has wavy blond hair and wears a boxing short and gloves. He has a black eye.

Elwy asks JOHN, DO YOU REHEARSE IT
IN LITTLE BITS LIKE A DANCE?
A BALLET?

He answers WELL, I TRY TO LEARN THE
WHOLE THING, A LITTLE BIT.
I TRY TO LEARN HOW TO BOX.
AND THEN WE HAVE A VERY GOOD
PROFESSIONAL BOXER IN HERE
WITH ME WHO IS
MAKING ME LOOK GOOD.
HE'S CHANGING HIS STYLE TO
ACCOMMODATE MY STYLE,
AND LETTING ME THROW
PUNCHES AT HIM.
HE DOESN'T HAVE
AN EGO PROBLEM.
HE'S A VERY TALENTED MAN.
VERY BRIGHT.
SO WE'RE LUCKY TO HAVE HIM.
GOOD SENSE OF
HUMOUR, A LOT OF FUN.
BUT I MEAN, IT'S A BALANCE,
SO WE LIKE EACH OTHER.

Elwy comments SOUNDS LIKE A
VERY TOUGH ROLE.
WE WATCHED THE
SHOOTING THIS MORNING.
THAT'S A TREMENDOUS CLIMAX.
MY GOD, WE WERE GOING OUT OF OUR
HEADS BACK THERE WATCHING IT.

He replies HOPE IT'S AS EXCITING FOR
THE PEOPLE IN THE THEATRE.

Elwy says WE LOVED YOU IN
DELIVERANCE
AND
COMING HOME,
AND YOU HAVE
ANOTHER CHALLENGE HERE.
YOU DON'T TAKE
EASY ROLES, DO YOU?

He says NO, I DON'T.

Elwy stands next to the ring as smoke appears on screen.

He smiles and says LADIES AND GENTLEMEN,
IT'S FOG TIME.
BOB DON IS A MAKE-UP MAN, OR
IS THE MAKE-UP MAN IN CHARGE
OF MAKE-UP ON
THE CHAMP.
WHAT IS YOUR TITLE
ON THE SHOOT, BOB?

Bob answers OH, MAKE-UP
DEPARTMENT HEAD.

He’s in his forties; he has dark wavy hair and wears a moustache.

Elwy says MAKE-UP DEPARTMENT HEAD.
YOU'RE PUTTING ON SOME VERY
TRICKY MAKE-UP ON JOHN VOIGHT.
AT LEAST IT LOOKED THAT WAY
FROM SITTING DOWN HERE
FROM OUR POSITION.
COULD YOU DESCRIBE
WHAT YOU WERE DOING?

Bob explains WELL, JOHN HAS BEEN THROUGH
A VERY FIERCE FIGHT, AND THE
IDEA IS HIS EYE HAS BEEN
CUT, BADLY CUT, BY A BUTTON.
AND HIS EYE SWELLS UP.

A clip shows Bob applying red makeup around John’s eye.

He explains BEING A FRANCO ZEFFIRELLI
PICTURE, WELL, HE HAS A
CERTAIN WAY HE
WANTS IT TO LOOK.
AND YOU DO IT YOUR WAY,
AND THEN FRANCO TELLS YOU
HOW HE WANTS IT.
AND HE'S GOT A TRACK RECORD,
SO WE MORE OR LESS PAY
ATTENTION TO HIM.

Elwy asks WHAT KIND OF MAKE-UP DO YOU
PUT ON TO GET THAT AFFECT?
CAN YOU DESCRIBE
TECHNICALLY TO OUR VIEWERS?

Bob says YEAH, ACTUALLY, IT'S A
POLYVINYL TYPE MAKE-UP.
WE ALSO USE LIQUID
ADHESIVE, SPONGE RUBBER.
BUT WHAT WE ARE DOING
TODAY IS A POLYVINYL.
AND THE IDEA IS TO GET IT ON
QUICKLY, GET IT OFF QUICKLY
BECAUSE WE ARE GOING FROM THE
BEGINNING OF THE SHOW TO THE
END OF THE SHOW
AND BACK AGAIN.

Elwy says OH, YES.

Bob explains SO IT'S PUT OFF, CLEANED,
PUT IT BACK ON AGAIN,
AND IT'LL BE DIRTY.

Elwy asks WHAT ARE SOME OF THE OTHER
PICTURES YOU'VE DONE
MAKE-UP ON, BOB?

Bob says RECENTLY,
OMEN II.
PRIOR TO THAT,
THE DEEP.
BLACK SUNDAY.
MISSOURI BREAKS.
SEVERAL OTHERS.

Elwy says YOU MENTIONED ONE THERE,
MISSOURI BREAKS
BECAUSE OF
MARLON BRANDO, DID YOU GET TO
KNOW HIM AT ALL BECAUSE OF
THE SHOOT?

Bob replies OH YEAH, HE'S VERY
FRIENDLY WITH THE CREW.
VERY FRIENDLY GUY, YEAH.

Elwy asks AND JACK NICHOLSON?

Bob answers HE'S A SWEETHEART.
REAL SWEETHEART.
GOOD GUY.

Elwy asks BOB, ONE OF THE TRICKIEST
THINGS YOU MUST DO,
AND I'VE BEEN WATCHING
YOU HERE, IS IN A MOVIE
THINGS ARE NOT MADE
SEQUENTIALLY.
THEY'RE SHOT ALL
OVER THE PLACE.
YOU'VE GOT TO KEEP TRACK OF
JOHN VOIGHT'S FACE IN VARIOUS
STAGES OF DISREPAIR.

Bob answers RIGHT.

Elwy continues WITH GASHES AND BLOOD
AND THINGS LIKE THAT.
HOW THE DEVIL
DO YOU DO THAT?

Bob says WELL, WE USE THE OLD
POLAROIDS, WHICH IS THIS IS
THE WAY HE LOOKS
AT THE MOMENT.

He hands Elwy a Polaroid depicting John Voight’s face in the present scene.

He continues AND ONE ROUND EARLIER THAN
THAT, HE LOOKED VERY BLOODY.
HE WAS BLEEDING ALL THE
WAY DOWN THE FRONT OF HIM.
HE'S CLEANED UP IN HIS
CORNER, AND THEN THIS IS THE
BEGINNING OF THE SIXTH.
HE HAS TO MATCH
THAT AT THIS MOMENT.
WE'RE SHOOTING
THE END OF THAT.

Ely says SO WITH EVERY STAGE IN THE
PICTURE, YOU'VE GOT A SHOT?

He says RIGHT, RIGHT.

Watch: The Making of a Motion Picture 3