TVO.org daily: Monday, May 11

Provincial parks reopen
By TVO Current Affairs - Published on May 11, 2020
Per Sunday's government report, there are 20,238 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Ontario. (iStock.com/MicroStockHub)

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Good morning, Ontario.

Here's what we're following


Ontario reports lowest new case count since March

Per Sunday's government report, there are 20,238 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Ontario, an increase of 294 — the lowest since March 31. There are 961 people in hospital, with 195 of them in intensive care and 140 on ventilators. To date, 1,634 people have died.

Provincial parks open today

More than 500 provincial parks and conservation areas are reopening today for day use. Camping will not be allowed, and playgrounds and beaches will remain closed, but visitors will be permitted to use trails — provided they practise physical distancing. Minister of the Environment, Conservation and Parks Jeff Yurek said the remaining 115 parks will open on May 15.

Retail stores with a street entrance are also allowed to reopen today for curbside pick-up.

Announcement coming on school year’s future

Premier Doug Ford said he’ll announce the fate of the school year this week. Currently, public schools are closed until at least May 29. "I know that parents and educators and staff would like some predictability today of what will June look like," Education Minister Stephen Lecce said Saturday. "What I can commit to is we're working very closely with the chief medical officer of health and the COVID-19 command table with one focus: how do we get students back into schools when it is safe.”

TVO.org publishing regional updates

Every day, we will publish a collection of COVID-19 news items from across the province. Please visit TVO.org for the latest. Here is this weekend’s edition.


Watch now

Seniors staying active during COVID-19

More than 200,000 Ontario seniors depend on seniors’ centres for physical activity and critical social experiences. With these centres now closed, reporter David Rockne Corrigan joins The Agenda to discuss how this programming has moved online.  

Random Acts of Legacy

Director Ali Kazimi rescues orphaned, decaying home movies — including a collection by Silas Fung, a commercial artist in Chicago. Fung’s films reveal the middle-class lives of a Chinese-American family from the 1930s through the Second World War. In this film, Kazimi searches for the Fungs’ surviving descendants and offers a different perspective on a Midwestern family of colour.


Read now

Can sex workers count on government support during COVID-19?

While governments continually announce new measures designed to shield Ontarians from economic hardship during COVID-19, advocates say that one group has been consistently overlooked: sex workers. Reporter Michael Rancic speaks to those involved in the industry. He writes: “Toronto-based sex worker william october has stopped all in-person client work completely and is now relying solely on income from online services. ‘It’s not nearly enough — and the absolute first time in my adult life that I haven’t been able to support myself with my private, in-person sessions,’ they explain. ‘I’ve had to move, and the hours of work that goes into doing online sex work full-time is exhausting.’”

A century of the Group of Seven

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A century after the first exhibition of paintings by the Group of Seven, Jamie Bradburn examines the group’s initial critical reception and eventual influence on Canadian art. He writes that the group “emerged at a time when discussions of Canadian identity were on the rise, and a mythology grew up around it that cast its modern landscapes as a radical response to the older, traditional European styles preferred by artists and their patrons.”


Tonight on TVO

8 p.m. — The Agenda: COVID-19 fatigue

Are Ontarians getting tired of hearing about the COVID-19 pandemic? The Agenda examines the efforts of news organizations and governments to maintain the public’s attention.  

9 p.m. — Einstein and Hawking: Masters of Our Universe, Ep. 2

Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking each shaped humanity's understanding of the universe. The second episode of this two-part documentary tracks where their work aligns and where the two physicists diverge.

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